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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 8:21 pm 
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Yes, it is. It is gold based on eb, also with mahogany.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2012 11:56 am 
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could some one help me is line breeding brouther to sister or do you have a outside rooster witch is the best way to go wally newchum


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:58 pm 
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I have read about something called a 'Bluebell' in the UK - apparently a cross between a Marans and a RIR. Pictures show them to be a nice greyish colour. Is this a possible sex - link here in Aus?

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:16 pm 
Few years back I read somewhere that the chooks will generally inherit trait from a dominant mother or father (so as with us humans I supposed – LOL). Seriously, I wonder though if we can use pure white birds for sex linked crosses. Is there a way to find out the exact genotype of pure white chooks?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:14 pm 
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wally r wrote:
could some one help me is line breeding brouther to sister or do you have a outside rooster witch is the best way to go wally newchum


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http://ultimatefowl.wordpress.com/2009/02/11/line-breeding/

by Dr Charles R H Everett & Craig Russell

My personal research in breeding has led me to begin gathering and collecting articles and books by cockfighters (cockers) of long ago; these men of the past preserved several different breeds of chickens for hundreds possibly even thousands of years. During that time they maintained type and vigor to an unparallel degree. It is my belief that their methods of breeding should be examined in detail to be utilized by the modern preservationist. Let me add, however, that this article is not an endorsement or defense of cockfighting; neither will I belie them in any manner. Instead, it is a heartfelt acknowledgement to men who perfected the art of breeding chickens. Further, I believe the modern preservationist can learn much more from the breeding techniques of cockers than he/she can from textbooks on commercial poultry breeding. (Note* It should go without saying that at all times you must select for vigor and type regardless of the breeding system utilized. Cocker Tan Bark states, “Good breeding is only a matter of intelligent selection of brood fowl…” (Tan Bark, Game Chickens and How to Breed Them, 1964, p. 27). What the ole time cockers strove for was prepotency. They desired to be able to predict with reasonable accuracy the outcome of any particular mating. For this reason, no cocker worth his salt would have consistently used the out-and-out system. Granted, at times they did cross, but very carefully. Their records consistently indicate that when they did cross they did so using the same strain of fowl they were hoping to improve. Of course, they were looking for gameness, but using their methods a breeder can breed for type, fertility, egg production, etc. The first system I would introduce was utilized by William Morgan, of Morgan Whitehackle fame, and some of the English cockers. It is a form of breeding known as “3 times in and once out.” This system was used to produce, in cockers’ terms, a “pure strain.” The following chart will explain how the system works. First Generation Hen Cock ½ hen ½ cock

Second Generation Hen to son Cock to daughter ¾ hen ¾ cock

Third Generation Hen to grandson Cock to granddaughter 7/8 hen 7/8 cock

Fourth Generation Hen to grandson Cock to granddaughter 15/16 hen 15/16 cock

Now in the 5th generation you breed the 15/16 hen to the 15/16 cock. Then, choosing the best hen(s) and cock(s) you begin again (Narragansett, The Gamecock, 1985, pp. 44-45). C. A. Finsterbusch recommends the same breeding strategy in his famous book Cockfighting All Over the Word page 152—153. If they chose to continue line breeding these fowl were what they termed “seed stock.” Seed stock was never pitted. Instead, they were crossed to a different strain to produce their “battle cocks.” Battle cocks were never used in breeding pens if this system were employed. Or, at this point you choose the three to five best hens and begin the clan mating system. Alva Campbell who created the “Campbell Blue Boones” during the early years of the twentieth century line bred his outstanding pullets to one cock, “Daniel Boone,” for eleven straight years (Histories of Game Strains, Grit and Steel, no date given, p.26). D. H. Pierce claimed his “Wisconsin Red Shufflers” were line bred for 35 years with no loss of vigor or gameness. (Histories of Game Strains, Grit and Steel, no date given, p. 20). How did these men accomplish this when so many modern textbooks on poultry genetics maintain this is impossible to do? I have discovered several key answers. First, “an inbreeder must breed only from his most vigorous… specimens” (Tan Bark, Game Chickens, 1964, p. 28). Second, they culled ruthlessly. Third, in any form of line breeding the youthfulness of the stock used cannot be overstated. Fourth, they often carried on the same mating (One cock to one hen) for four or five years. Thus, in twenty years it was possible to have only produced four or five distinct generations. When cockers happened upon a cock and hen that produced winners in the pit, then they mated these two year after year. Fifth, they kept accurate records of every mating and often practiced single matings. Sixth, they only attempted close inbreeding on free range giving the birds every advantage of producing constitutional soundness and vitality (Tan Bark, Game Chickens, 1964, p. 28). These six keys allowed the cockers to be greatly successful at the art of breeding game fowl centuries before the advent of modern genetics. Many cockers practiced variations of the rolling-matings and clan-matings systems. When practicing the rolling-matings they would often include side matings of line breeding. When using the clan system the large breeders often kept five to seven clans. (They called them “yards.”) With the clan matings they most often used the matriarchal system as advocated by Dick Demansky. At times they would create “new” clans or yards of full sisters when a particular hen within the clan produced exceptional sons. Thus, this one hen became prepotent in the new yard through her daughters. Like those of traditional farmers, for whom poultry was an important part of the subsistence, the methods of cockers have often been disparaged by modern experts. But for serious preservationists and small flock owners in general their tried and true methods are among the surest ways to turn simple reproduction into serious breeding and systematic flock improvement. One of the truly wonderful things about raising chickens is that you the breeder can choose your own system of breeding to create your “own strain.” Yes, you can even experiment! Regardless of how you personally feel about the sport of cockfighting, these men of a by gone era have much to teach us. So, why not learn from the original preservationist: cockers?

There is also some useful information here http://www.the-coop.org/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=28027

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 1:45 pm 
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Golden Phoenix
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liseyd wrote:
I have read about something called a 'Bluebell' in the UK - apparently a cross between a Marans and a RIR. Pictures show them to be a nice greyish colour. Is this a possible sex - link here in Aus?


Sorry, missed this question. A brief search suggests the cross is between the cuckoo Marans (and note it's on the British Standard, which requires clean shanks, as opposed to the French Standard used in Australia which requires feathered shanks) and RIR.

Cuckoo Marans aren't (yet?) in Australia. I don't think the cross would work with the wheatens that are currently the only "pure" Marans available here.

Mind you and however, the result does look awfully like the Croad Langshan/Marans crosses a few of us have running around. (They're not sex-linked though).


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:59 am 
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caladenia wrote:
Lots of questions lately about sex linked cross breeds. Then a discussion this evening on msn. This is from Rick Kemp's Exhibition Poultrypg 35-36.

1. RIR male x Light Sussex Female
pullets warm buff shade, cockerels white or light yellow. Must be done in this order to work.

2. Brown Leghorn male X Light Sussex female
pullets have light brown head and back with heavy chocolate stripes. Often two small thin stripes of colour run down either side of main stripes. Cockerels are black and white.

3. Buff leghorn male X Light Sussex female
Pullets are buff with occasional slight black markings and cockerels are silvery white also with occasional black markings, but ground markings readily distinguishable.

4. Black Leghorn Male X Barred Rock female
Pullets have pure black head cockerels have white spot on head. Can also use australorp or black langshan male with similar results.

5. Barnevelder Male X Columbian Wyandotte female
Similar results to cross 2.

6. Buff orpington male X Light Sussex female or similar silver female
Buff pullets and yellow/white cockerels

7. Brown leghorn male X barred rock female
cockerels black on top of body with white spot. Beak shanks and toes are yellow. Pullets are all black on top, beak shanks and toes all black or very dark.

8. Golden Legbar male X Light Sussex female
Gold pullets and silver cockerels

9. Golden Legbar male X RIR female
Willow legged pullets and yellow legged cockerels at hatching time

Crosses 8 & 9 have double sex links, also have feathering, with the pullets having fast feathering wings.

10. Golden Legbar male X brown leghorn female
Shank colour—pullets willow and cockerels yellow

11. RIR male X White Wyandotte female
Pullets are brown with a dark stripe running down them, cockerels are silver with black markings.


i hope this helps some folks
:P :lol: :P :lol:
cheers
jacquie

caladenia
I have 2 light sussex heavy female since one years itry my best to find male for them but coudnot found,so now i can use blue orpigton male to get origenal and exbitional breed?if not plz let me know which male i can use for them,?thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:17 am 
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macca wrote:
Oh lol thanks Nick :D.


macca ,
pls let me know what result will occur when blue orpington male cross with light sussex female??


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:23 pm 
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khalil143 wrote:
caladenia
I have 2 light sussex heavy female since one years itry my best to find male for them but coudnot found,so now i can use blue orpigton male to get origenal and exbitional breed?if not plz let me know which male i can use for them,?thanks

hi khalil143,
you will not get pure bred hens from the cross of light sussex and blue orpingtons. you need to find either a male light sussex ( in which state are you located?) or female blue/black or splash orpingtons.
what you will get from the cross you have described is a light sussex/orpington cross, with no sex linked properties
:hiya:

edited to remove quote of large block of text as it is already above.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:58 pm 
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thanks caladenia
i am living in pakistan islamabad
and i want to get more breed of light sussex .so plz let me know which breed of male i can use for get pure light sussex?

edited to remove large quotes within quotes for readability.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 6:12 pm 
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This topic is for sex-linked cross breeds. To discuss purebreeding further, please post in a general breeds thread, not in this sticky.

Thank you. :thanks:

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:31 pm 
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I crossed a RIR Bantam (M) with standard sized White Leghorn (F). The result a dusty white with black specks


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2013 10:31 pm 
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Is that a sex-linked cross?


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2013 11:00 pm 
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There is a dwarfing gene on the sex chromosome and there is also silver/gold. So yes there should be some differences.

Pullet chicks should be yellow with some orange and bantam size (dominant white + gold + dwarf from the RIR father).

Male chicks should be yellow and normal size (dominant white on a silver base + dominant large size from their mother). However RIR sometimes have other red genes that are not sex linked, so in all likelihood the males will have some red leakage too making the sex determination at hatching a bit subtle?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:25 am 
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I love hamburghs and barnevelders, can I sex link the cross? Maybe by leg colour or silver spangled over gold laced or the other way around?


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