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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:05 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Hey there, Random question.

My wyandottes have the sex linked slow feathering gene. Males take twice as long to get their first feathers than females do, and you can tell the sex at about 6 weeks as females are fully feathered and males are still relatively nude.

Image

Image

These guys are 4 weeks old, and already you can see the difference.

Okay, so , the reason for the question.

One of the offspring last year didnt have the gene (or had it, whatever wildtype is). The male feathered up like a female. I am breeding from that male this year as he is stunning.

And the questions;
What is the gene? Surely recessive. Wildtype? Genotype?

Is it good or bad? Are there downsides to not having slow feathering?

Any general thoughts.

I will try to find it in my genetics books, but most of them are about colours, not physical attributes.

Intrigued
Raf

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:45 pm 
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Prime Pekin
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Hi Raf,

from what i have read about slow feathering is that its main advantage was for the commercial industry and the ability to sex chicks at young age. From a Plymouth Rock perspactive, it is meant to help with clearing up barring. As you know as feathers grow the pigmentation is put onto feather, the advantage of slow feathering is that these pigments are put down clearly when laid down slowly.


Christian

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Last edited by intoChooks on Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:10 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Thanks Christian.

K is slow feathering? K+ or k+, dom or recessive?

It doesnt appear to make a difference to lacing, at least on eb, as the twin boys look identical, lacing wise, yet one is slwo feathered, the other is not.

Raf

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:21 pm 
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Prime Pekin
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Hi Raf,

I wanted to add another spanner in the works, there is a slow feathering gene that helps with the barring pattern, K it also has variants and order of dominance as follows Kn>Ks>K>k+ (k+abscence), i have had one chick in my time with Ks here is a photo;

Image


I think this one is Ks as i have been told Kn wont feather up at all. I gave this guy away to the produce store, he'll probably end up with some isa's.

It is sex linked so more noticable in males.

Cheers

Christian

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:26 pm 
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Prime Pekin
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Slow feathering K is found in most heavy softfeather breeds, it is dominant to k+ fast feathering found in most light softfeather breeds.
It has most effect on barring ,as the pattern is caused by an interruption in the deposition of melanin in the feather. The slower the feather grows the more compact the barring. It has no known effect on patterns caused by the lacing gene. It has no known effect on size or body structure,
David


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:35 pm 
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Nifty Duck
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I am wondering if Pekins have this gene out of the lot hatched a couple of weeks ago, I have a few of the chicks have no sign of tail or proper foot feathers starting. Plus their wing feathers are not as developed as the other chicks. I was hoping the ones that have more feathers are girls? Or is this just wishful thinking?? There is a big difference between them and they all hatched within a day.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:06 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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If it is slow feathering, I find it has little effect on the first wing feathers, or the tail feathers, but as soon as you see shoulder feathers and definately when chest feathers appear, those are females.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:19 pm 
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Hi raf, the ones I mentioned with the much more advanced wing/tail/foot feathers etc. includes shoulder feathers. So it seems these ones will be girls :) I'll have to go have a look at chests to see what thats like. The other chicks have only the first wing tip feathers coming through.
Cheers, Wendy

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:24 pm 
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Yep they have the beginnings of chest feathers soming through too. :)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:51 pm 
you can find slow feathering in pekins duck diva. my silvers used to have it but afraid the numbers are reducing as i have moved over to gold birds. the dominat slow feathering gene is very closely linked to the silver/gold loci and very hard to break apart.

i used to like having the gene in my birds as my ugly duckling ckls used to grow in to beautiful roosters.

k


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:27 pm 
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Im hoping this is the case as the boys (if they really are) are looking to be partridge, mottle & silver - possibly lavender?? I dont know what lavender chicks look like (I live in hope I know the breeder has one lav roo) and the buff chickie has got some partridge type feathering on its wings so it will be interesting when it gets its adult feathers.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:48 pm 
duck diva post some photos. they can just be in a box, don't have to be individuals. i based the lavender pekins on sliver and slow feathering.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 2:21 am 
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ok will make a new thread tomorrow sometime :)

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:37 am 
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Do both parents contribute to the slow feathering gene, or does only one have to have it to pass it onto their offspring? My Australorps have it, the boys are noticably bald as badgers, the shoulder areas are pretty much skin when the girls are fully feathered. If I don't continue line breeding and use an unrelated male over the girls, will the gene eventually dissappear or do the females have the capacity to pass it on by themselves?


Michelle

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:37 am 
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It is sex linked, that is why you can tell the homozygous slow feathering males, K/K from the hemizygous slow feathering pullets K/-, as a result of the accumulated effect of K.
Even if a hemizygous female K/- is mated to a fast featheing male k+/k+ ,the resulting cockerels will be heterozygous ,K/k+ ,slow feathering.
David


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