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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 8:34 am 
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Clever Cockerel
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No, no, no, that's the wrong answer! :aaargh:

LOL! Oh well, I'll still do it for fun, and it'll either work, be exactly the opposite of what I expect, or won't be able to tell at all :)

Eggs go under mum today.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 1:11 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Hello


I'm still finding this sexing method fascinating, if we get some chicks I'm definitely going to try and work out what we have before they start crowing!!
The barneys we get have different feathers after a while so they are easy, the wyandottes are much harder we've had some very lae developers to the point we named one princess and then had to give HIM away and the plymouth I can't tell either.
So if I remember the girls get their feathers sooner, and the combs grow quicker on the boys?

cheers

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 2:16 pm 
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Clever Cockerel
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That's what I've heard, which is a method a little different to the one explained in the video with the day-old chicks (the methods you describe are for older chicks).

I'll be continuing to look up and ask about different methods, and try each one on my chicks when they hatch. I'm VERY interested to know whether my chicks will be swapping gender with each new method, and how reliable each one ends up being.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 6:25 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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:rofl:

yes some interesting scientific research ahead!

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 6:40 pm 
shaz68 wrote:
That's what I've heard, which is a method a little different to the one explained in the video with the day-old chicks (the methods you describe are for older chicks).

I'll be continuing to look up and ask about different methods, and try each one on my chicks when they hatch. I'm VERY interested to know whether my chicks will be swapping gender with each new method, and how reliable each one ends up being.


And that's all you can do :biggrin: so good on you for at least giving several methods a good go.
That's all we did :nail:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 2:36 pm 
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Clever Cockerel
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I wanted to provide the results of my "trial", now that the chicks have all grown up :)

Here's the original pic with our chicks just a few days old:
Image

I used the patterns on the dorkings' heads to determine that the first three were girls, and the fourth one was a boy. Of the orpingtons on the bottom row, I used the wing feather sexing method, and determined the darker one on the left in each image were boys, and the lighter one on the right in each image were girls. There was also another black chick who hatched after the photos were taken, who I determined to be a boy as well based on this method.

We have a friend who used to work in a hatchery, who came around and used a vent-sexing method on all of these chicks. His conclusions were the same for all but the youngest black chick (not pictured) - he was undecided on that one.

So when they were a couple of months old, I took the three boys (one dorking, two orpingtons - the third met an untimely end) to my dad's as he has a larger area for them, out of town, and no limit on roosters.

Now I have 3 dorking girls who are all looking very lovely, but I suspect still another month or two away from laying, and 2 beautiful big orpingtons whose combs and wattles are so big and bright I expect an egg to pop out of them any day now.

Dad gave me an update on the roosters a couple of weeks ago. The dorking boy is strutting his stuff down there, and the two orpington roosters have both started to lay eggs. :rofl:

My conclusion: While it was a fun and interesting experiment, this method does not appear to work for orpington chicks (or at least not that line).

Also, if anyone is interested, I have for sale two incredibly unique black Orpington roosters who have the ability to lay eggs. Understandably, I expect to sell these for quite a high price ;)

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:45 pm 
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For blackfacesheep.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 2:10 am 
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Gallant Game
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Donna wrote:
And I wont even start on this.
Search this forum and you will see plenty on this subject from us.

It works for us, has for 4 years now on 100's of chicks both pure and cross.

Our neighbour gets the 'boys' and he has been disappointed as we have not made a mistake where he has ended up with a girl or two.

We did keep one rooster out of the 100s but this was a batch, hatched by the hen and we knew we were 'wingin it' because we had gone past the day three mark and was really into the day four.

We check days olds as soon as they fluff up, finger nail polish their heads, then check again on day three and send cockerals to neighbour.

:claps: :claps: :claps:

Hello BYP member Donna (and other curious members).

I am wondering if you still find the feather sexing is working on your day old chicks. I have long been able to fairly accurately sex chicks from some breeds at about the 2 to 4 week mark by the undeniable fact that in many breeds I've had, the females feather up much quicker than the males. There are always borderline cases that are hard to tell.

It has occurred to me that it could be feasible to feather sex these same chicks as day olds the same as the hatcheries do. So I have started a trial as the chicks are currently hatching out. All the people in the know will say this method is only possible with the correct genetic sex-linked cross for slow and fast feathering gene, but my theory is that maybe this factor only pronounces the effect so much that hatchery workers can easily see the difference at a moments glance (as seen in the video link at the top of this post).

The reality for home bred chicks could be that the differences are there but they are just far more subtle and harder to see. Perhaps many people cast off this method far too quickly as unreliable without seeking out the finer details (hence my careful trial).

A lot of people don't clearly point out for example that there are two rows of feather on the wing tips, an upper row (wing coverts) and a lower set row (the wing primaries). You have to look very carefully on day old chicks to even tell which is the upper or lower row (we are talking a millimetre or less difference), before you can hope to ascertain which are longer or shorter. Then it is only the ones where the lower primary feather row is longer that are female. If both rows are the same length OR if the upper covert row are longer and the primaries are shorter then they are male. Without looking very closely and carefully the casual looker will see long and short and presume female. This is I believe where the mistake may be made and error creeps in.

Does this reflect your experience and can you confirm this to be true or not? Thanks if you get a chance to come back and respond (I know this is an old thread).

Anyone else is welcome to also contribute any further insights. :thumbs:

Cheers. ML

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 9:39 am 
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Great Game
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I have had very mixed results trying to sex from wing feathers in the first day, and as for fast feather and slow feather gene, well my bantam wyandottes blue laced red and black laced red, the black laced feathered much faster then the blue laced red regardless of sex. I stick these days to comb sexing and at a week old find i get it right 90% of the time. EXCEPT for silkies :aaargh: they are a hard lot to sex.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:48 pm 
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Gallant Game
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mycoola wrote:
I have had very mixed results trying to sex from wing feathers in the first day, and as for fast feather and slow feather gene, well my bantam wyandottes blue laced red and black laced red, the black laced feathered much faster then the blue laced red regardless of sex. I stick these days to comb sexing and at a week old find i get it right 90% of the time. EXCEPT for silkies :aaargh: they are a hard lot to sex.

Yes, it continues to frustrate. Just when you think you are on to a system along comes an exception. I have yet to find an early predictor I can totally rely on (certainly not to guarantee to purchasers). Despite my early predictions I still wait till I see more obvious signs before deciding. And I often get those that "switch" sex on me along the way! :rofl:

Edited to add: I have heard that even if feather sexing on day olds is possible in some breeds (as some proponents will swear is true), apparently it is not possible in bantam breeds (not sure why - just what I've heard!)

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 5:37 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Good luck. I once thought I could teach myself to vent sex. After a 50% failure rate (every one looked female :laughing) I gave up. Hopefully your feather sexing might be more successful


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