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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:16 am 
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Location: Morayfield, SEQ
Here's something different that I stumbled upon today. Never seen anything quite like it before. :laughing

Sperm competition between brothers and female choice - from Cedric Kai Wei Tan

Winner of Dance your PhD 2013 by Science.

"Females of the red jungle fowl (forest chicken) mate with multiple males, which can create competition between sperm of different males in order to fertilize the egg. In my PhD thesis, I explored the effect of brotherhood on sperm competition and female choice. Interestingly, the brother of the first male that the female has mated with invests more sperm in the female than the non-brother of the first male mate. However, the female ejects a higher proportion of sperm from the brother of the first mate and favours the sperm of the non-brother, facilitating a higher fertility by the non-brother’s sperm.
In addition to the main story, we showcase some of the interesting biology of sperm. First, sperm quality differs and while some move faster and are more forward-moving, others move in circles. Second, sperm of multiple males can interact with one another, sometimes even antagonistically.

Inspired by various sports, the dance movements in this video reflect the competitive nature in the sperm world. The two original music pieces in this video are (1) ‘Animal Love’, which is about the variety of sexual behavior in different species and (2) ‘Scenester’, a piece telling the story about a girl who keeps changing her ways and males trying to keep up with her."



Spoiler
Director: Cedric Tan (zoo.ox.ac.uk/egi/members/cedric-tan-kai-wei/)
Producer: Sozos Michaelides (zoo.ox.ac.uk/egi/members/sozos-michaelides/)
Co-choreographer: Hannah Moore
Co-producer: Kiyono Sekii (zoo.ox.ac.uk/egi/members/kiyono-sekii/)
Director of Photography: Xinyang Hong (worldpictured.com/videos)
Guest camera man for Port Meadow: Robert Rapoport (robertrapoport.com/)
Original music and lyrics by Stuart Noah (stuartnoah.bandcamp.com/; facebook.com/stuart.noah)
This project was funded by the European Society for Evolutionary Biology, Edward Grey Institute of Ornithology (University of Oxford) and Green Templeton College (University of Oxford).
http://vimeo.com/77304026

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:38 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
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Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
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Location: SE Qld
Amazing! Evolutionary biologists are showing more and more female effects (choice?) of male to father her progeny in multiple potential-father situations. Quite remarkable really.

Dance your thesis is blowing my mind. I really don't think I'd have had the wherewithal left to organise that after completing a thesis.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:26 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
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Location: ACT area
Browsing thru some old posts and found this which reminded me of a couple of other interesting things that I've come across

Hens prefer to mate with dominant males; they can eject the sperm of more subordinate males after copulation.

later in the book it also says ".... males.... when mated with the same female repeatedly... gradually reduce the amount of sperm that they invest....... Females in best condition and those new to the flock, will probably recieve more sperm per mating from the same male"

viewtopic.php?f=19&t=8036035&hilit=just+bought+a+new+chook+book

Need to watch some more of these 'vids'. Belated thanks Cathy


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:07 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
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Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4512
Location: SE Qld
When you think about how important 'vigour' of progeny is to survival and ultimate reproduction, and that's all that matters in a Mendelian survival of the fittest sence, it's not surprising that things that favour vigorous progeny have been selected for over time. We're learning all the time about the depth and breadth of genetic strategies that have been deployed over evolutionary time.


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