Backyard Poultry Forum • View topic - La Bresse

Backyard Poultry Forum

Chickens, waterfowl & all poultry - home of exhibition & backyard poultry in Australia & New Zealand
Login with a social network:
It is currently Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:53 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 10:23 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 6321
Location: ACT area
Bresse chicken
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the chicken. For other uses, see Bresse (disambiguation).
Poulet de Bresse
Poulet de Bresse - Bresse Chicken.jpg
A labelled poulet de Bresse
Type pullet, chicken or capon
Place of origin France
Region or state Bresse
Other information appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) status

The approximate area of production of the poulet de Bresse (in red)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bresse_ch ... Bresse.JPG

White Bresse de Bény chickens
The poulet de Bresse (French pronunciation: ​[pu.lɛ d(ə) bʁɛs]) or volaille de Bresse is a French chicken product which has appellation d'origine contrôlée status. It may be produced only from white chickens of the Bresse breed raised within a legally defined area of the historic region and former province of Bresse, in eastern France.

History[edit]
The chickens of the Bresse region have long enjoyed a high reputation. The lawyer, politician, epicure and gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755–1826), who was born at Belley in the Ain, is supposed to have described the Bresse chicken as "the queen of poultry, the poultry of kings".[1] The name Volaille de Bresse, used for both chicken products and for the dinde de Bresse, the turkey of the area, received legal protection on 22 December 1936;[2] this became an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) in 1957.[1] Today the poulet de Bresse has the reputation of being the best quality table chicken in the world.[3] The chef Georges Blanc, who is from Bourg-en-Bresse, has been president of the Comité Interprofessionnel de la Volaille de Bresse, the association which oversees the product, since 1986.[4] Alan Davidson described the poulet de Bresse as the "aristocrat of modern table poultry",[5] and Heston Blumenthal selected it for one of the dishes in his book In Search of Perfection.[6]

Production[edit]
Poulet de Bresse may be produced only from white chickens (the Bresse de Bény variety) of the Bresse breed, raised within a legally defined area of the historic region and former province of Bresse, in eastern France. The area is roughly rectangular, approximately 100 km by 40 km, and includes parts of the départements of Ain, Jura and Saône-et-Loire, in the regions of Rhône-Alpes, Franche-Comté and Bourgogne respectively. It lies mainly between the towns of Mâcon, Chalon-sur-Saône, Dole and Lons-le-Saunier; Bourg-en-Bresse is within the area. Lyon is not far to the south, and Dijon not far to the north.

Approximately 1.2 million poulet de Bresse birds are produced each year, about 0.1% of the total annual production of chickens in France; about 10% are exported.[1] The chickens are raised under strict controls. There are about 200 breeders; each must have a minimum of 0.5 ha of pasture in the area of production, and allow a minimum of 10 m2 per bird. Each bird must pass inspection by the Centre de Sélection de la Volaille de Bresse, the only breeding centre for the Bresse chicken.[2]

The birds are kept free range for at least four months. From about 35 days they are fed cereals and dairy products; the diet is intentionally kept low in protein so that the birds will forage for insects. They are then "finished" in an épinette, a cage in a darkened fattening shed, where they are intensively fed on maize and milk.[1] Poulets or pullets are fattened for two weeks, and slaughtered at a minimum age of four months and a minimum weight of 1.2 kg; poulardes or large hens are fattened for four weeks and slaughtered at five months, when they weigh at least 1.8 kg; chapons or capons are also fattened for four weeks, and are slaughtered at eight months or more, at a minimum weight of 3 kg.[2]

The birds are marketed with the head and characteristic slate-blue legs, traditionally a sign of authenticity. The left leg carries a metal leg-ring with the name of the producer.[2]

Poulet de Bresse commands premium prices. In 2002 producers of poulet de Bresse received an average of €4.00 per kg (whole chicken, ready to cook); comparable prices received by producers of organic and standard chickens were €2.70 and €1.60 respectively.[7] Retail prices are much higher; a price of £19.50 per kg was reported from London in 2011.[8]

See also[edit]
Bresse Gauloise
References[edit]
^ Jump up to: a b c d Jon Henley (10 January 2008). Top of the pecking order. The Guardian. Accessed October 2014.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Dirk de Jong (2007). De Bresse-Gauloise: Ruim 400 jaar oud en nog springlevend = Bresse-Gauloise: More than 400 years old, and still fresh and lively. Aviculture-Europe 3 (2): [unpaginated, 9 pages].
Jump up ^ Victoria Roberts (2008). British poultry standards: complete specifications and judging points of all standardized breeds and varieties of poultry as compiled by the specialist breed clubs and recognised by the Poultry Club of Great Britain. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 9781405156424. p. 330.
Jump up ^ Press release for La vie en blanc, by Georges Blanc (2008). Saint-Julien-sur-Veyle: GSL éditions. Accessed October 2014.
Jump up ^ Alan Davidson, A. (1999). The Oxford companion to food. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780192115799. p. 378.
Jump up ^ Rien T. Fertel (2007). Review of Heston Blumenthal: In Search of Perfection: Reinventing Kitchen Classics by Heston Blumenthal. Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies 7 (4): 100. doi:10.1525/gfc.2007.7.4.100 (subscription required)
Jump up ^ E. Verrier, M. Tixier-Boichard, R. Bernigaud, M. Naves (2005). Conservation and value of local livestock breeds: usefulness of niche products and/or adaptation to specific environments. Animal Genetic Resources Information 36 (April 2005): 21-31. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. doi:10.1017/S1014233900005538
Jump up ^ Christopher Hirst (19 March 2011). Home to roast: Are designer chickens worth the money?. The Independent. Accessed October 2014.
Categories: ChickenFood and drink in FranceCuisine of Auvergne-Rhône-AlpesFranche-Comté

This page was last edited on 27 March 2017, at 10:09.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaDevelopersCookie statementMobile viewWikimedia Foundation Powered by MediaWiki


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 12:17 pm 
Offline
Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
I think it will be a worthwhile addition to gourmet foods in Australia. Pretty much all the existing commercial meat chickens are fast growing and lacking in chicken flavour. The Bresse offers a opportunity to market something interesting at a higher price point - a bit like what Wagyu has done for beef.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 1:16 pm 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 6321
Location: ACT area
[quote="sue55"]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bresse_ch ... Bresse.JPG

White Bresse de Bény chickens
The poulet de Bresse (French pronunciation: ​[pu.lɛ d(ə) bʁɛs]) or volaille de Bresse is a French chicken product which has appellation d'origine contrôlée status. It may be produced only from white chickens of the Bresse breed raised within a legally defined area of the historic region and former province of Bresse, in eastern France.-----------------------
There are about 200 breeders; each must have a minimum of 0.5 ha of pasture in the area of production, and allow a minimum of 10 m2 per bird. Each bird must pass inspection by the Centre de Sélection de la Volaille de Bresse, the only breeding centre for the Bresse chicken.[2]------------------------------------
The birds are marketed with the head and characteristic slate-blue legs, traditionally a sign of authenticity. The left leg carries a metal leg-ring with the name of the producer.[

What are the implications of this?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:12 pm 
Offline
Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
Yes there is protection on calling them the real thing. However much as with wine when we stopped being able to label wine as 'Burgundy ' or whatever and had to use varietal names like Cabernet or Shiraz. I expect the same thing can happen here.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:35 pm 
Offline
Fiesty Fowl
Fiesty Fowl

Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 12:20 pm
Posts: 1195
Location: Thirlmere nsw
Looks there is competition from the sommerlad chickens that are bringing top dollar on the market. It would probably take a few years to get the bresse up enough in birds before marketing could happen. I dare say they would be expensive now to purchase. I love the blue legs, very different on a white bird.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: La Bresse
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:47 pm 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 6321
Location: ACT area
I've been doing some reading (supposed to be cleaning chook stuff out of the garage - at least now, if the rat's take a deep breath they will inhale a toxic overload of rat bait).
Found this interesting. One of the things it says is that the French standard calls for "eyes as dark as possible" but that the broiler birds have red eyes - one of the deviations between show and utility lines.

http://www.aviculture-europe.nl/nummers/07e02a04.pdf


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
©2004-2014 Backyardpoultry.com. Content rights reserved
freestone