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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 6:20 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Rural NSW
I killed my first muscovy drake on the weekend and did such a bad job of plucking that I ended up skinning the bird.

I now have a skinless duck in the freezer and don't know how it is best cooked. Every recipe I have seen is for a whole duck with skin, or for a small part of the duck (such as breast meat) with skin. No one seems to have a skinless duck recipe.

Any advice or ideas wopuld be most welcome.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 7:33 pm 
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Clever Cockerel
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Here is something I found on the net that might help.

http://www.1atexasduckhunting.com/duckrecipes.htm

seems you will have to think about the meat drying out with out the skin on it, I wonder if using alfoil if baking and stuffing the bird well ie with lemon would help?

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 11:38 pm 
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Clever Cockerel
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Here is a simple one:
http://www.ifood.tv/recipe/duck-rillette

edited to add:
http://www.ifood.tv/recipe/braised-duck ... tney-sauce

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:20 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Skinless duck or chook can be cooked on a wire rack over a dish of water.

Wrap the foil over the top and sides of the dish ensuring the bird si enveloped in the foil.

Ensure your stuffing is loose, moist and cooked (then cooled) before placing inside the bird.

Keep the oven on moderate and use a meat thermometer to check if done.

If browning of the meat is required - you can do this before placing the bird into the oven, by searing the bird in a hot pan for no more than around 30 secs each side/top/bottom etc.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:45 am 
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Showy Hen
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Would wrapping it in bacon while cooking help?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:01 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Oh yummo - yes !

I would even do away with the foil if wrapping in bacon.

But still would place the bird on a wire rack over a dish of water.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:24 am 
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Golden Pekin
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I would do a duck confit - basically duck braised in fat or oil. Bring a large amount of oil (enough to immerse the duck in later) to a slow boil in an oven-proof pot then take it off the heat. Immerse the duck in it (cut up into joints) and put it in a 150 degree oven . Cook for about 2 hours. Brown it in a hot frypan to put some colour on it.

Good with potatoes and pesto or a rocket, pear, bacon and walnut salad.

Edited to revise my temps and times :)

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Last edited by 70%cocoa on Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:20 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Hi Rach

Do you think though that a muscovy would be a little too - ducky, gamey for the confit?
And Mussie can be a little dry just because it is so lean, frying naturally takes away moisture from any meat??

Nah me mussie duck would have to stay over a water dish and even more so if the skin, a small layer of fat, had been removed...........even by accident :D

But I do have to say - the next freeranged boker that goes from paddock to freezer is going to get that treatment of yours -sounds so delish !! :biggrin:

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:48 am 
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Golden Pekin
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I would not think that the flavour would be a problem.

Any kind of cooking drives moisture out from the meat - the higher the temperature the more this happens. It doesn't matter if it's boiled, braised, steamed, baked, fried or fricasseed. All methods can produce dry meat - with the exception being cooking at very low temps in a vaccum (sous vide).

Confiting works best on things that (a) have a lot of connective tissue and/or that have had to 'do work' when the animal was alive (so things like legs, necks, jaw muscles or cheeks) or (b) have some fat content (e.g. pork belly...yummm...confit pork belly is so good....). Any kind of duck leg/wing is going to fit "(a)" but as to whether Muscovy is too lean - I just don't know about that or how important that is. I have never cooked or eaten a Muscovy, only duck you buy from the shops. I still think it'd be worth a try :) If I ever end up with a skinless duck I'll give it a whirl.

Confit is not the same as frying, it is more like braising. The frying at the end is only a minute a side to colour it. :)

You can salt the duck for a few hours before hand too - I cut up lots of thyme and mix it with lots of good quality salt (Murray river salt) and cover the duck with it. Any longer than that and I find it too salty. You don't have to salt it though (salting removes moisture).

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:24 pm 
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Showy Hen
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I should have probably said that the duck is older than the ducks you buy from the shops. The meat may be a little tougher because of that. He was a big bird but could/would still fly each day. Would this make much difference? I guess I will have to cook it very slow?

I ended up cutting the wings off at the elbow joint as there is little meat and mostly bone after that. Even after removing the wings and losing all the skin/fat he dressed out to just over 2.3kg

I hope that my next attempts at plucking go a lot better. I still have two extra drakes who have to go, and it breaks my heart to waste so much of them.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:31 pm 
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Golden Pekin
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I'd Google 'cooking wild duck' or 'wild duck recipes'. These shoudl turn up a few ways of dealing with a leaner, slightly older duck that has had a lot of exercise.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:37 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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what about sous-vide, or as they say on masterchef Sue vee!


portion him/her out and toss bits in a glad bag and simmer for whatever the interweb says. then finish him off in butter in a saute pan and whatever other flavourings you like

there's a video here.. just pretend yours has skin!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJQQPKLMwAg

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:44 pm 
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Flock Master
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He sounds like he'd make a good curry!

If you want to avoid drying the meat out you could use a slow cooker if you have one.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 8:20 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Trust me on the water dish under the wire rack with foil for older birds and particularly this one with no skin/fat :biggrin:

We do as the poms do (well the neighbour who culls our birds does.....) waits until they are well after 14 months with size and layers of fat on them before culling for the freezer...

:catch:

Yes a slow oven is highly desirable for freerange birds of all types

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:28 am 
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Showy Hen
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Thank you for all the replies! We ate the duck last night.

We have a small orchard and over summer we made a plum and apple chutney from our plum and apple trees. My wife decided that a slow cooker was the way to go. She put the duck in the slow cooker with the chutney and some vegetables. About 6 hours later it was ready.

At first I was surprised how little meat there is on such a large duck, but then when he was all dished up I was surprised how much meat we had. We ended up having too much meat for one family meal which is good considering how much effort was involved. The end result was a little tough (but not too tough) and absolutely delicious.

I think with the lack of fat and skin that it tasted a little less like duck then we were expecting. It kind of tasted like a really high quality steak. Each breast even looked like a large steak.

My kids absolutely loved it. I have never seen them eat so much. I was worried that they would not eat it because they love our ducks, but it tasted so great that they could not get enough. We also spent some time looking at the carcase and discussing all the different bones, they found it fascinating. That being said I don't plan on letting them see the killing and gutting part of things.


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