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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 8:28 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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I am going to make the step towards making my own sausages and probably salami.

Always wanted to do it but never quite gotten around to it, but now I think is about time.

So hit me with your recipes, hints, do's and don'ts.

Oh and if anyone has feedback on sausage machines that would be good too,



Ron

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 9:39 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
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Will you use a starter culture for salami?


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 10:36 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Grab this book, it's a great entry into the world of meats making.

http://www.bookdepository.com/Charcuterie-Michael-Ruhlman-Brian-Polcyn-Yevgenity-Solovyev/9780393240054?ref=grid-view
I've just noticed they also have another book which I think I'll have to buy myself.

http://www.bookdepository.com/Salumi-Michael-Ruhlman-Brian-Polcyn/9780393068597?ref=bd_recs_1
A lot people either don't like or can't eat foods containing nitrites and nitrates, but it's my belief that using them both really do make for the safest product at the end. They don't just give the foodstuffs a nice pink/red hue, they stop bacteria such as Clostridium botulinum, which is one you don't ever want to consume.

Which one you use (either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate) depends on whether the end product will be cooked or not. They are surprisingly easy to come by online nowadays, usually being sold as Pink Curing Salt #1 or #2 or Prague Powder #1 or #2. Natural casings (my preference) are usually pretty easy to come by at butcher shops. Usually you can get a big box of cleaned ones for cheap.

Old refrigerators convert pretty easily into curing cabinets, there are guides online to show you how to modify it for temp, humidity and air flow.

As for equipment, you can't really go wrong with a KitchenAid with mincer and stuffer attachments. Expensive but overall versatility of the product can't be beat.

Start with the easy cooked products like sausages and bacon. That will let you get a feel for the sausage stuffing and how the curing salt works, with less risk of serious food poisoning. And with the sausages and salami, always use a bit more fat than you think you'd need, there is nothing worse than a pasty, dry sausage! There can be a bit of a trick to get the filling to stick together, but usually it's remedied easily by salting the meat before you mince and letting it sit for a bit (usually 10-45 mins depending) to let the myosin be extracted. The myosin is the key to binding sausage/salami contents together, especially with really emulsified sausages.

Anyway, grab that first book, it'll tell you a lot of what you need to know, and contains a good amount of recipes to get you going. Have fun!


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2016 10:38 am 
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Assist Admin
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We use one of these


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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2016 3:06 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Ron if you watch SBS TV you will know that last night (Thursday) was the episode of Gourmet Farmer where they killed & used the whole of one of his own young sows. Nose to tail eating.
If you didn't see that episode you can see it on catch-up TV whatever it is called on SBS.
Luckily he has neighbours who are Italian & who know how to use the whole pig.
Worth watching to see what they did with all the bits & pieces that are usually wasted.

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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2016 7:02 pm 
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Phoenix
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ClissaTSoyFreeChooks wrote:
Ron if you watch SBS TV you will know that last night (Thursday) was the episode of Gourmet Farmer where they killed & used the whole of one of his own young sows. Nose to tail eating.
If you didn't see that episode you can see it on catch-up TV whatever it is called on SBS.
Luckily he has neighbours who are Italian & who know how to use the whole pig.
Worth watching to see what they did with all the bits & pieces that are usually wasted.


Drat - i missed seeing that one...was looking forward to it, forgot that it was on last night as i had a day off yesterday instead of Wednesday


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2016 4:40 am 
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Gallant Game
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I have never made sausages.

All I know is meat is a high risk food as far as food poisoning so be careful with your food hygiene.

is it worth investigating what sausage casings are available easily so you can be certain the sausage machine is compatible with them?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2016 6:54 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
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I'm thinking of turning some adult turkeys into sausages. There's loads of meat but almost no fat. Does anyone know what to use? Pig fat has been suggested, but that seems a bit odd to me. Can you use olive oil?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:05 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Pig or beef fat are the 2 usual components for snags to give a good consistency.
If you google making sausages you'll soon find pages of recipes with varying % of fat depending on how juicy you want your snag once cooked.
The more fat, the juicier & the more flavour is carried into the mouth.
Chicken fat sometimes works but it melts at a fairly low temp resulting in an empty dry snag if cooked too fast.
Oils simply drain out of the sausage once it begins to heat leaving a dry residue that wont be juicy to the mouth feel.
A hard fat will hold it's shape during cooking & just go nice & soft & almost clear giving a great mouth feel & carrying heaps of flavour.
Horse fat works great apparently!

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going through the process of getting organic certification for my property but horse & chook worming throwing a big spanner in the works

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 7:29 pm 
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Phoenix
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I have been making a lot of my own charcuterie for many years. The books mentioned above are worth reading from beginning to end and I buy a ot of my supplies form here: http://www.mistygully.com.au/.

There are many more around for specialist type stuff and I have many recipes collected from a lot of different sources for sausages if you are interested. Let me know if you are stuck on something and need anything. As for machines, I prefer the upright sausage stuffers and I find the 5L versions probably the best to use. I am very fortunate in still having a butcher close that does a lot of his own bacons, hams, brining and curing and has always been generous with his time to help me out. He still makes the best hams at Christmas though and you always know when he has fired up the smoker....its usually a good time to go over with a few beers.

Most sausages use about 25% back fat, if you live in the city, try going to the Asian butchers for pork and back fat.

J

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