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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:17 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Lancashire UK, for now.
Heya folks..

Well STILL have all 4 of our goslings. They are 5 weeeks old today and have been outside for a week.

We only brought them into the barn for a night when the temp dropped so fast that there was 1/4 inch of ice on the water containers.

They are sleeping in a closed yard at night on straw under a wooden shelter. They free range most of the day and are just about to graduate to "Poultry Finisher"

WHEN would be the best time to worm them and what to use..? Also did we put them out too early?

I spend time with them as much as I can, but they dont follow me like they used to and are not happy to have too many pats any more.
Is that MY fault? Can I fix this?

Also I have NEVER seen creatures poo so much.. except my goats and even then not like these lil guys/gals?? How do you tell when they are boys and girls? What age?

Anyhoo.. all advice would be appreciated.

Cheers in advance.. Sara


P.S. DONT you DARE try to sell me any more goslings Macl....lol
I would take more in a heartbeat but am trying to be tough untill after the 4th of Jan.. THEN I can have more babies.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 11:58 pm 
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Gallant Game
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Location: Woodend, VIC
Geese and ducks are much hardier than chooks so 4 weeks old is not too early to go outside given the shelter you have provided.
They are discovering their independence now and nothing but food bribes will keep them "tame".
They should still follow you around to a certain extent so have a pocket of bread or some other treat to reward such behaviour if that is what you want from them.
Just remember they don't really eat meat (bugs and slugs) like ducks do so don't overdo the chook food (which contains meat by products) if giving as a treat.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:07 am 
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Phoenix
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I have just a few more :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Their brothers and sisters have been out side a long time before them and they are going strong have not lost any and we too have very cold nights a week or so ago.
The ones born probably two weeks after them were put outside probably two weeks ago as well
They will always respond to food better to ask Cabrissi or Tribe of Honk about the patting problem as I do not pat mine in fact I have three that were given to me because they did too much poo!!!!!!!! and they follow me around drive me nuts have threatened them with the oven a few times.
Tribe of Honk will advise the worming solution he uses and rate.
As for the sexing Schnapper is the expert gosling sexer :lol: :lol:
The sexing is basically the same for ducks etc have a look in the sticky can you remember what Schnapper done. :)


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:35 am 
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Discerning Duck
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Food, food and more food. They know I'm the source of their favorite goodies - fruit n veg bits, bread, wheat etc. I am a popular person with a bucket in my hand. ;-)

I think also predictability of the interaction and still feeling in control.

Birds are ultimately prey animals, ones who didn't view novel circumstances and actions with a bit of inherant caution until they discovered if it was safe or not historically didn't live very long, nor did those who allowed themselves to be trapped in a corner or grip. We've modified them a bit in domestication but a fair bit of that mentality is still around.

While we train them through handling as youngsters to have a positive expectancy bias towards novel stuff and handling/restraint/having a hand on them animals have a tendancy to drift-back to their instincts a bit and I think understanding where they are coming from give us a leg up.

The visual difference could also be pretty big factor. Last year I noticed there was differences from my chicks when they were in the brooder and then once they were in the shed... well, probably I looked very different to them really! From the brooder I look like a big face and hand floating at the top of the box or just a face above and hands below while holding them. From their POV on the ground, I suddenly am a body, arms, legs, move very different and even the familiar face probably looks different from 5'5" above. LOL So I sit with them and get them used to me and then with me kneeling or standing and walking etc. I've not really had a chance to test my theory with goslings not having any. But the Bailey's, who did huge amounts of training with over 140 varities of animals wild and domestic over decades even for the CIA, military, heaps of movies, devised training programs for zoos/animal parks/seaworld etc also in their retirment years have been running "advanced operant conditioning weekends" better known among training geeks as Chicken Camp as ways to refine training skills as skills sufficient to train horses or dogs for example, simply don't cut it with training chooks who require more precision and focus from their trainers. ;-) Students quickly found the way to deal with chickens, besides precision, high RoR and not lumping at all, was to take advantage of the way their minds worked and their biggest strength - visual discrimination. I reckon geese are probably similar, to be able to pick up a single tiny grain of wheat or tenderest bit of a grass blade among the tougher stuff. To give an idea of what they had to train them to do - tasks for the chickens would include stuff like on a single command the chook walks up a ladder, turns 180°, crosses a little bridge, pecks a ping pong ball, turns 180° again and goes down the ladder where it knocks over first a yellow bowling pin and then the blue that are side by side. That is done purely by training, with no force, corrections, luring and once the trick has been taught - no guidance from the human save the initial command.

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