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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:58 am 
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Gallant Game
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This is a monthly news letter written by Kenny Troiano - available for anyone to subscribe to, so I hope it is not a problem posting here.

I dont nececariliy agree with everything that he says but I found it an interesting read and thought others might as well.

AMERICAN GAMES ACCEPTANCE INTO THE

“STANDARD OF PERFECTION”

By Kenny Troiano

Copyright © 2013 by Kenny Troiano/Maximus Troy
Publications

http://www.maximustroypublications.com/ ... Kenny.html



In the poultry industry, there are no breed registry associations like those for four-footed farm animals, where the animal's “breed” is identified by its papers. Since chickens and gamefowl have no registry and therefore no papers, some would argue that with no known documentation of their breeding there is no such thing as breeds, only types. Registered animals with papers are usually based on nothing more than the honesty of the person who registered the animal, which if you ask me is no different from accepting the verbal honesty of a breeder of chickens or gamefowl.


The “Standard of Perfection” takes the place of such a registry association by recognizing individuals that show the proper characteristics for their particular breed and variety. The Standard of Perfection is an illustrated book published by the A.P.A. (the American Poultry Association), and is often referred to simply as “The Standard.” This book is revised and updated every few years. Its main purpose is to lists and describe all the recognized breeds and varieties, and to group them in their proper classes. It is also intended to protected and preserve the characteristics of the various breeds and varieties, not by the exclusion of individuals known to carry "impure blood," as do the dogs and farm type animals, but by the disqualification for competition in the show room. This is achieved by the
recognition of defects, and any characteristics and traits that are not ideal for the breed. Since defects indicate impure breeding, and are a detriment to the breed, birds that display defects are disqualified.


Difference between the terms “Defect” and“Disqualification”: let’s clear up the misperception between the terms "defect" and "disqualification." A defect is a characteristic which is not in accordance with the breed and varietal descriptions given in the “Standard.” Defects usually have little or no relation to the usefulness of an individual. They are simply departures from the desired characteristics that are ideal for the breed or variety to which an individual belongs.

A disqualification may be one of two things. It may be a deformity; or it may be a defect regarded as very serious. In either case, a bird showing a disqualification is barred from competition in the show room. All disqualifications for American Games are listed in The Gamefowl Breeders Manual and Cockers Guide – Volume Two.

While it is true that most disqualifications, like defects, in no way affect a bird's ability or performance, it is wise for the breeder to pay them the consideration they deserve.

The Purpose the Standard: The “Standard of Perfection” is used primarily for those that are interested in showing their fowl in exhibitions. It is also the official guide for
judges to evaluate and select the best birds according to type and color. However, many breeders used this book as a breeding guideline or bible in the selection of the proper characteristics.

The Recognition of American Games: No one can say for sure, exactly, how many breeds of domestic chickens and gamefowl there are in the world. Nevertheless, the current edition of the “American Standard of Perfection,” published by the A.P.A. only recognizes a small number of them. In fact they exclude, entirely, the breed known as the American Games. The A.B.A. (the American Bantam Association) does officially recognize the American Game Bantam, but the A.P.A. has disregarded their full sized cousins.

Special note of interest: The A.P.A. was first organized in 1873 by representatives of different sections of the United States and Canada. Its primary objective was to standardize the breeds and varieties of domestic chickens and gamefowl, which are to be exhibited in poultry shows.

The American Game is a bird that has been around longer and bred truer than any other recognized breed, variety, or strain. Without a doubt, the American Gamefowl would have been eligible for recognition by the American Poultry Association, if cockers would have, early on, only requested such recognition. This lack of interest in the exhibition of American Games has been the fault of the breeder and the downfall of the breed. Cockers must be aware of the importance of this recognition. It legitimizes the breed’s existence, and could impact their survival. Neglect here could mean the extinction of the breed.

Today, we are struggling to get American Games recognized by the A.P.A. and their members. Due to poor exposure, caused by irresponsible and foolish individuals, and the relentless attacks from Animal Rights Organizations, the breeding and raising of American Games is looked upon as something illegal and immoral. Many breeders of domestic chickens look at American Games as something to stay clear of, as if they are toxic. The typical poultrymen has gone to extremes in order to disassociate themselves from gamefowl and their breeders. It is for this reason that all breeders of American Games need to get involved in this process.

I encourage you to join the A.P.A. and voice your opinion on the matter. In fact, we need more breeders of American Games to not only become members of the organization, but to become leaders in the organization as well. It is important to become one with breeders and raisers of domestic poultry, not to look at them as something that is separate or unrelated to them. Anything that affects American Games affects all chickens, and visa-versa.


The Procedure for Recognition into the Standard: What can we do, as individuals, to get American Games officially recognized by the American Poultry Association? There is a procedure for the recognition of new breeds and varieties.

First of all, a petition for recognition must be presented to the American Poultry Association at their annual meeting.

The petition must include:

• The name of the breed or variety.

• The facts regarding its origin and breeding.

• Documentations of five or more members of the Association,who have bred American Games for two years or more, confirming that 50 percent of the offspring are reasonably true to type or variety.

• Documentations showing that two or more specimens have been exhibited in each of the classes (such as cock, hen, stag and pullet), at two shows held by the American Poultry Association.

• A written standard for the breed or variety.

The Association claims that it maintains an attitude of strict impartiality, and that it does not discriminate between the breeds or varieties that it recognizes and describes. Let’s hope that they share the same impartiality when it comes to the acceptance of new breeds and varieties. There is no reason why American Games should not be recognized and accepted into the Standard.

For more information, and an accurate description of the rules, regulations, and procedures, refer to the most resent of publications of the “American Standard of Perfection” published by the “American Poultry Association.”


http://www.maximustroypublications.com/ ... Kenny.html



I hope you enjoyed the newsletter, and that the information which I provide helps you in the eventual improvement and advancement of your fowl. It is a long journey, but a worthwhile one. Remember, if we all work harder to perpetuate superior fowl, fowl that have the complete package (appearance, temperament and performance), everyone benefits. Hope you have a great winter. Cooler weather is onthe way!



Sincerely, Kenny Troiano

Fellow gamefowl and poultry enthusiast


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 9:46 am 
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Wise One
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Mods note: Written approval to post the above article on Backyard Poultry has been given by the Author


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 4:25 pm 
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Champion Bird
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Dan1971 wrote:

First of all, a petition for recognition must be presented to the American Poultry Association at their annual meeting.

The petition must include:

• The name of the breed or variety.

• The facts regarding its origin and breeding.

• Documentations of five or more members of the Association,who have bred American Games for two years or more, confirming that 50 percent of the offspring are reasonably true to type or variety.

• Documentations showing that two or more specimens have been exhibited in each of the classes (such as cock, hen, stag and pullet), at two shows held by the American Poultry Association.

• A written standard for the breed or variety.


I wonder if the Australian PS has similar requirements for new breed additions?

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 4:49 pm 
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Gallant Game
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I wondered about that myself George.

I also found it interesting that we find ourselves with an American Game Breed in the the Australian Poultry Standard, when the equivalent association in the breeds apparent country of origin (American Poultry Association) do not have it as a recognised breed.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 8:20 pm 
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Wyandotte Warrior
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Dan1971 wrote:
also found it interesting that we find ourselves with an American Game Breed in the the Australian Poultry Standard, when the equivalent association in the breeds apparent country of origin (American Poultry Association) do not have it as a recognised breed.



I think Kenny implies the reasons behind this with his perceived frustration of elements of the american game breeders that continue to use their birds for illegal means (illegal in Australia and nearly all States of America). His frustration is evident in his 9th and 10th paragraph.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 9:21 pm 
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Gallant Game
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Kennys views on why they are not included doesn't change the fact that they are not included.

When he says 'The American Game has been around longer and bred truer than any other recognised breed, variety or strain' (parra 9) that's a bold statement. Perhaps he is also referring to their history before landing in America and taking on a new name.

What is in a name?

Many of the strains come directly from England.They originate from the same place for the same task. That they choose to rename them American Game, to distinguish from the Exhibition Old English Game, or for what ever reason is their prerogative.

I don't dislike the fowl that are called American Game in the states. And they are having their own struggles with their own poultry associations for recognition and acceptance. As I said, they can call them what they like in their country.

In Australia I object to what seems to be an attempt to change the name of a Fowl with proven English heritage to an Americanism.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 4:10 pm 
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Wyandotte Warrior
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Dan1971 wrote:
In Australia I object to what seems to be an attempt to change the name of a Fowl with proven English heritage to an Americanism.


It's fine to object, but the reality of the situation in Oz is that the vast majority of breeders recognise the type of fowl exhibited as Old English Game as Old English Game , not Oxford or Carlisle or any other extreme variation. The introduction of the American Game into the APS now gives breeders with that type of bird described by the AG standard, the opportunity to show them.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 6:10 pm 
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Gallant Game
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DenisL wrote:

It's fine to object,.


Yay, we agree on something :-D

But seriously, I realise how things are at the moment. But things change - have been changing even in the year or so that I have been a member here.

So I'll keep objecting because its something I believe in.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 8:14 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Im with you Dan.dennis as you will find Kenny could not show his birds as OEG because they only accept light leg birds,like somebody said same fowl differant name.If I went to america and bought some American Show Racers I could show them here as Showpen Homers same bird differant name.


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