Backyard Poultry Forum • View topic - Just bought a new chook book

Backyard Poultry Forum

Chickens, waterfowl & all poultry - home of exhibition & backyard poultry in Australia & New Zealand
Login with a social network:
It is currently Fri May 26, 2017 6:33 pm

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 11:31 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
The Chicken - A Natural History
general editor Dr Joseph Barber 2012

Race Point Publishing Ivy Press
ISBN-13c978-1-9737994-03-7


This is not another 'How to Keep Chooks' book
It focuses on their behaviour and emotions (what and why) and relates this to their welfare

eg. Did you know that a hen if a hen is stressed she will have a high level of corticosterones (for fight or flight) and high levels of these will be present in her eggs. These stress hormones can interfere with cognitive development of the embryo. Chicks which hatch from these eggs are gererally more fearful and more sensitive to changes in their environment.

I am finding it very interesting (and readable)

There is a section at the end which profiles different breeds and describe their needs in terms of 'Behaviour and Upkeep'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 12:59 pm 
Offline
Assist Admin
Assist Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 25, 2009 9:06 pm
Posts: 8267
Share the good bits with us please Sue

_________________
Image
Erika


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 2:02 pm 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Will do Erika - as I reread it I'll post some snippets of interest.

Introducing the Chicken

Some Fascinating Fowl Facts

Chickens outnumber humans by almost 3 to 1
In 2010 there were almost 1,400 breeds of chicken but a total of 43 breeds were considered extinct
Hens prefer to mate with dominant males; they can eject the sperm of more subordinate males after copulation.
Chickens can run as fast as 9 miles per hour
Chickens have a good sense of smell - chicks can even react to odours they were exposed to before hatching.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 7:44 pm 
Offline
Gallant Game
Gallant Game
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 6:47 pm
Posts: 481
Location: East Gippsland
Thank you for sharing.

_________________
Small free-range flock of Croad Langshans
http://croadlangshan.org/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 8:54 pm 
Offline
Showy Hen
Showy Hen
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 3:06 pm
Posts: 222
sue55 wrote:
they can eject the sperm of more subordinate males after copulation.


I read the report of this years ago and trying to share the knowledge ended up in quite an argument over it.
Good job sue


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 11:37 pm 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Hardfeather - later in the book it also says ".... males.... when mated with the same female repeatedly... gradually reduce the amount of sperm that they invest....... Females in best condition and those new to the flock, will probably recieve more sperm per mating from the same male"

Chapter 2 - The Chicken of Tomorrow

Genetic engineering has been applied to produce a chicken with 4 legs and no wings
The broiler industry is interested in breeding 'pre plucked ' chickens - using a genetic mutation which results in a featherless chicken
Transgenics is being considered to transfer genes from other organisms to enable chickens to produce pharmaceutical medicines or other proteins in their eggs.
At least two of the major chicken breeding companies may begin to clone chickens on an industrial scale


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2015 9:22 am 
Offline
Clever Cockerel
Clever Cockerel

Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 12:16 am
Posts: 1637
Location: Yarra Junction, Vic
I dont like the sound of that !!

Is the book an Australian publication ?
I'd be interested in checking it out. Where did you buy it from?

_________________
Love my girls - Silkies, Pekins, Campines, Light Sussex, Bantam Orpingtons, Isa Browns, New Hampshires
Silkie crosses, 8 roosters and forever in my heart my precious Thumbelina.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2015 9:41 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Sounds scarey,doesn't it? (and if this is only the future of commercial poultry........!?!?!?) The rest of the book is about 'backyarders'

UK publication - details at top of post
I bought mine from a local independant bookshop but it could probably be found online.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 10:18 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Chapter 2 - Anatomy and Biology

About 10 days before laying some bones (eg tibia & femur) undergo a change so that they can provide calcium for egg shell formation. If insuficcient calcium is available thru diet osteoporosis and fractures can result.

Different breeds of chickens have different heart rates - larger breeds at the lower end (200 -350 bpm). Stress can increase the heart rate - dropping a day old chick can increase rate from 300 to 560 bpm. Exposure to bright light can increase heart rate.

When a chicken exhales, the air passes over a series of bones and membranes which extract and absorb water from the air. This assists in preventing dehydration in hot environments. A rooster takes about 18 -20 breaths a minute, a hen 30 -35.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 12:55 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Chapter 2 - The Skin

Yellow skinned breeds of chickens start to lose their pigments during the laying season. A white or pinkish vent indicates that thre hen is laying. Pigment loss progresses thru the eye ring,earlobes, beak (base to tip) and finally to the lower leg(from front to back) Bleached shanks indicate that a hen has been in continuous producton for 15-20 weeks. Pigment reappears in the same order that it went. ( a hen that stopped laying 2 or 3 weeks ago may have a beak with a yellow base and colourless tip.


Last edited by sue55 on Sat May 30, 2015 2:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 7:55 am 
Offline
Assist Admin
Assist Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 25, 2009 9:06 pm
Posts: 8267
Thats true, when my wyandotte stop laying to moult the leg colour comes back beautifully.

_________________
Image
Erika


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 8:56 am 
Offline
Showy Hen
Showy Hen
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 3:06 pm
Posts: 222
These are pretty good sue, good idea to hatch yellow legged breeds so they would be point of lay during show season


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 7:29 pm 
Offline
Golden Kingfisher
Golden Kingfisher
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 16, 2008 9:54 am
Posts: 13115
Location: Canberra
This is fascinating! Thanks for the awesome info, Sue :)

_________________
Cheerio, Rach
Blue Swedish Ducks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2015 8:16 pm 
Offline
Phoenix
Phoenix
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:19 pm
Posts: 8312
Location: Gold Coast QLD
Agreed ! totally fascinating...please keep sharing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2015 12:50 am 
Offline
Old Mother Goose
Old Mother Goose
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 5885
Location: ACT area
Thanks

Chapter 3 - Behaviour
Selfishness is Natural

"-----genes and individuals are selfish. They act so as to increase their own chances to survive and reproduce"
Consider the roo who finds food, but instead of eating it himself,he calls the hens to eat.
Or the mother hen who calls at the sight of a predator, making herself more vulnerable to the danger.
How can this be considered selfish?
The roo benefits from sharing his food and being able to mate and reproduce from well nourished hens.
The mother hen benefits from alerting her chicks to seek safety. (and from the reciprocal call from other hens in the group)
These seemingly selfless acts ultimately increase the probability of these individuals reproducing successfully - ie they are selfish.

Choosy Females and Willing Males.
The Bateman Paradigm

The reproductive success of females depends on mating with a high quality, fertile male.
Obtaining fertile sperm from a sexually attractive rooster has 2 benefits for the hen
- her eggs will be viable
- her own sons will be sexually attractive and all carrying her genes

The reproductive success of males depends on mating with as many healthy females as possible.
These females will lay more viable eggs, with a higher hatch rate and healthy chickens - all carrying his genes


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
©2004-2014 Backyardpoultry.com. Content rights reserved
freestone