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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:31 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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I have read a few threads about keeping roosters in a box to muffle their crowing, or darkened rooms etc.

Is this really worth trying? Do people do it and does it work?

It would be excellent to have a rooster in the backyard with the ladies permanently, and neighbours all say its fine, but you know how these things turn out... :(

I might even bring a rooster in to "Visit" for a week every now and again, if its possible. Otherwise I will take the girls on a trip to the farm.... 8)

So, should I even try, permanent or visiting, and if yes, then what to do specifically, logistically etc.

Cheers
Raphael

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:06 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Bendigo, vic
Raphael,

We had a rooster come for a visit for a week, but he took a while to settle down and crowed a lot. I was a nervous wreck, worrying about the neighbours. He also seemed to start crowing earlier every morning, or maybe it was just my nerves and I wasn't sleeping so well so I heard him earlier every morning. The girls didn't appreciate his attention either. I think they were used to running their own ship, and didn't need any one bossing them around.

Having said that, if our new little chick turns out to be a rooster, I think we will give it a try and keep him. My theory is that if he was born here, he might not crow so much to try and prove himself to the girls???

Hopefully someone can give you some more useful answers, I will be interested to hear what others have tried.

cheers, jayne


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:36 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Raphael

We put our rooster into one of the nesting boxes and put a cover over it, with a small gap at the top for ventilation. He stays very quiet all night and we don't hear him at all :D :D

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:50 pm 
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Golden Robin
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Location: Tuross Head, NSW fsr south east coast
Raphael

Touchy question but yes it does help to keep them quiet. The big problem is that the roosters also crow during the day as well. In a suburban environment there is often shift workers trying to sleep and often in hot weather where sleeping is harder.

Also you will find neighbours saying to themselves during the day that that rooster is going to going to wake them in the morning so they complain in advance.

But... in any suburb or town in Australia at around dawn, you can hear a rooster somewhere in the neighbourhood. Councils do not have employees prowling around at dawn looking for roosters. They only respond to complaints.

When I used to live in suburbia I use to tell people that if a rooster still wakes them after three weeks I will dispose of it. I also used to point out that mostly when people hear a rooster it is because they are already awake for some other reason.

Just useful commentary (hopefully) for you.

Mike

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:31 pm 
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Gallant Game
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i'm actually anxious right now too because my little cockerel has started to crow and he sounds like he's shrieking :lol: . he's inside at night and i cover the box. whenever i uncover the box and let light in in the morning he will crow about 6 or 7 times then stop. it doesn't matter if its 6 am or 9am. he doesn't do it yet during the day so fingers crossed it stays that way!

you have to ask yourself:
how close are the neighbours
how irritable are the neighbours
is the roo necessary (mine was an accidental cockerel chick that i couldn't bare to give away)
once you have him, if theres a complaint can you get rid of him?

you could try going to a breeder with adult roos and asking for the quietest, least aggressive roo they have. or the one with the least offensive crow. in my very limited experience the dark box works like a charm. i'm considering, even when he's older, (he's a bantam) getting a large card box with some food and water etc in it where he can roost permanently for the night in the laundry to muffle sound/control light. i've heard of people having 3 or 4 roos in boxes in an old car at night to muffle the sound.

anyways good luck. they really are full of personality however choose your breed/roo wisely regarding aggression, size and loudness of crow because it varies!

hayley


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 9:01 pm 
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Golden Swan
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Hi rwood,

It does work (not that I've ever done it) but I belong to a UK based poultry forum and a lot of people there live in terraced houses and keep roosters. At night the 'done' thing seems to be to box him and put the box in the cupboard under the stairs. Seems to work for a lot of people!

NellyG

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:14 am 
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Showy Hen
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I have an Australorp roo that sleeps in his box in the garage.I started this each night because it was me he was waking! Boy can he crow :shock:
I live in suburbia and have kept roosters for years.It sounds like a hassle going out every night but it takes me 2minutes to do and if you like roosters as much as me....its no trouble at all. :D
I have him in a plywood box and inside that i place a cardboard box with straw.I find its much easier to grab the cardboard box,upend it in the garden and place it back with fresh straw and replace the cardboard box now and then as they get soiled,this keeps the plywood clean at all times.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 11:02 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Wow, ok, so it seems quite possible then, if all goes well (which Murphy surely wont stand for). Thanks for all your comments.

If I raise the rooster from this weeks expected hatch, it wont crow for about 18 weeks anyway, and by then I might have sorted something out. Having grown up in the yard he might be more at home. There are no other roosters in the area and no shift workers, so the neighbours might get used to him as he gets his voice.

I will try then. I have a shed near the coop and will arrange for a night box. In the end if its too much trouble, i will ship him off to a friend out of town and just bring him in for a visit.

Cheers
Raf

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:22 pm 
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Great Game
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Hi Raf,

I too am a suburbanite, and i would not be without my little roo, Charlie.

I got him at 4 weeks old, he started crowing (or screeching) at four or five months i think.

He has always, in my mind, been considered 'temporary', as i am fully aware that council law states 'no roosters' and several of our neighbours are certainly rather 'complaint happy'..

But... he is still here.

He sleeps in a box at night, in the laundry. We tried him in his box in the shed or the garage, but his noise just echoed even more.

I have not found a way to STOP his crowing. All the rules say if they cant extend their neck, then they cant crow, but by golly it would have to be an awfully small box... Charlie always manages to find an angle to move his neck to crow.
So instead its just a matter of keeping it dark and away from 'dawn sounds' (other birds waking) and keeping his box in a sheltered spot, no echoes..

I still say to this day, if someone complains, they've every right to, and the rooster will go... but i've had him this long and heard not a word... and he's certainly pretty noisey during the day.

Oh, and i much prefer having a roo with my girls, as opposed to not :)

Cheers.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2007 11:20 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Location: Port Kembla
My brother lives in Queanbeyan. Every night he puts his rooster into a cat-carrying cage, puts the cage into a Mercedes and parks the Mercedes in the garage, then shuts the door. No rooster noises at all.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:16 am 
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Gallant Game
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Im in canberra you know the land of whinging public servants :lol:
An i keep a silky roo.
He sleeps in a box inside my shed/coop.
No noise from him.
I let him out at about 7.30 as that the legal time for all building/construction work to begin so i figure if they can ake noise.....

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 2:21 am 
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Superior Bird
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Would a second hand Mercedes be all right?


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 7:47 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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What about a Volkswagon? It has heating but not air con.

Raf go for it..

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 10:12 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Ok, two options are flying around my head.

Assume I am building a coop this summer, 2 runs going in opposit directions, about 4x2m each running off a central covered coop (so I can keep flocks seperate if needed).

Option 1.
I can build a small box, inside the enclosed section, which i can put Rooster in each night and let him out in the morning. Thinking of using 1 inch ply (which I have some of already) lined with carpet on the walls and ceiling to muffle the noise.

Upside, easy to do, as rooster is in the coop already and its only a small move.

Downside, I cant go away for the weekend without leaving him in the box for days (not an humane option). Need to find a chook friendly neighbour.

Option 2.
I have a large area under the house. My house is on a sloping block so at the low end, the floor of the house is about 6 feet above the ground. The previous owner put in a cement floor about 3mx3m and made it a sort of cellar. All the surrounds of the house are brick, with only the small ventilation holes letting in air and some light. I am thinking I can build a little coop (lilke my A-frame i just built), with a sound proofed box at one end and a small 1mx1m run. Now I can put him in there and lock him in the box at night. Let him out to run back to the girls each morning. Should I need to go away for the weekend, I let him have access to the small run so he can at least poke around a bit, but its still under the house and semi quiet.

Upside, - he has room to move when Im away
Downside, its an effort to get him to and from the coop each night.

Conclusion,
I am leaning towards the mini-coop under the house. I want him to have room should i go away. Will be quite sound proof under the house I imagine, but I could be wrong.

Any thoughts?

Raf[/b]

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2007 1:52 am 
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Showy Hen
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Light is the main trigger for crowing - or the sight/sound of another rooster. :?

If you can keep your chook-house or night-box dark and reasonably sound-proofed - until later in the morning - that should reduce the problems. The roosters won't be set-off, and many people have gone to work by then. Also, other noises such as chain-saws, blower-vacs, music, wood-working tools, Mr Whippy vans, traffic etc are likely to be in full operation.

My two bantam roosters (an OEG and a Wyandotte) put themselves to bed in their separate sides of a brick chook-house which has a tiled roof. All I have to do is go and place pieces of thick polystyrene over the doors when I lock up. The doors are blacked out by black garden plastic, and the polystyrene - all held in place by weldmesh. These are removed when I open up next day. The ceiling, and other gaps in the chook-house are lined with permanent polystyrene which came in sheets about 8ft x 4ft x 2in. Very little light gets in unless the doors are open - and very little sound gets out.

If it is a very quiet day around the neighbourhood, I leave my roosters inside the chook house. If it is a noisier day (windy etc) I let one rooster out into the chook-yard. Later, toward evening, I let him and his girls free-range for a couple of hours. The next day, the other rooster is let out with his girls. I rarely let both out together. That way, they don't seem to get into the dreaded extended crowing competitions.

My latest little cockerell is just starting to occasionally crow - but he is like a fog-horn!! He is a cuckoo Orpington (possibly cross Cochin). He comes to the laundry door when it is fairly early in the evening and waits to be let in. He then has a peck at the dogs bowls - and then puts himself into a cat-carrier. I come along and close the cage end and lightly cover the whole thing with a towel to cut out light from the window. He does not make another sound until I let him out to free-range - often (on weekends) as late as 11.30am. I will soon have to make him a bigger night-container (see below) or find him a new home.

My roosters seem quite healthy and happy - and have adapted well to the above arrangements. The hens definitely seem happier with a rooster.

If you can get hold of some old tea-chests, dog-kennels (or similar), cover them with polysterene, or egg-carton type acoustic sheeting, or rolls of acoustic sheeting - as used in home-theatres (try Clark Rubber or specialist insulation outlets).

Glaziers or builders may have used polystyrene sheets available if you ask nicely. Cover this with something to water-proof it e.g. black plastic sheeting (my favourite cheap product). Make a suitable sound-proofed door. Line the box with easy-clean plastic or paper and straw. Make sure it has ventilation - but is kept dark. Align the doors or any openings away from the direction of neighbours.

The other advantage of using the polystyrene sheeting is that it is both noise and heat-proof. I have seen an ordinary metal garden-shed turned into a "Chook Palace" - by lining with polystyrene (for noise and heat control) - plus having green shade-cloth (raised a few inches above) covering the roof and outside walls - and above that a fixed sprinkler system which can be turned on if the inside temperature gets too high. If the sprinkler is used every so often to wet the shade-cloth, the inside temperature can be many degrees cooler than outside. A good thick passionfruit or choco-vine covering the metal shed with a sprinkler turned on every so often also works fairly well for cooling. :)

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