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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 10:17 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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I've just come to realise that we've had Japanese quail for more than 3 years now. A good time, methinks, to muse on what I've learned about them & what's worked well.

HOUSING:
Much as small enclosures are something espoused as being suitable for them, the 4 foot by 9 foot aviary (inclusive of birdlock) that they're in at our place suits them brilliantly.

I couldn't have them all in small enclosures all the time for many reasons, some of which are:-
- they seem to genuinely enjoy the extra space, both for running about & to enjoy dustbathing in large areas
- they poo like the world depends on it, and I couldn't imagine cleaning out a small enclosure (even with drop tray) daily
- the height (completely walk-in) means that no quail has ever hit the roof if startled (not that our adults get startled much)

I used to rotate the cocks through the flock of hens, but have established that the setup we have allows for a couple of males in with the hens year round, so have no need to do that most of the year. Only if I bring in a new male from elsewhere, or have decided to keep a freshly hatched male to grow out to be a potential new permanent male, do I sometimes have separately penned males in a small enclosure for a bit. As soon as I can incorporate them into the aviary, I find that best for all concerned.

LITTER:
I've trialled a bunch of things, in tandem, by putting them on the aviary floor in thicknesses of up to 20 cm at times, which settles to about 10 cm over time. I've worked out that for the aviary we use (fully roofed & enclosed at rear & one side, plus partially at another side) pretty much anything goes with only a few small things that I now take into account:-
- anything with 'sharp' bits is not ideal... things like tanbark, for example, isn't much fun for the quail
- anything they can dustbathe in is preferred... things like sand or soil
- anything they can scratch about the place is fun... things like wood shavings or rice hulls
- anything they can pull apart & climb through is enjoyable... bales of just about anything, put in whole, are appreciated by our lot
- keeping the consistency such that there is plenty of texture seems to work well both for the enjoyment of the birds & for keeping quail poo from forming cakes (again, it is not possible to overestimate the volume of poop that quail create if you haven't kept them before)

I used to have a separate dustbath for them, but it's really not required in our aviary. They kick everything together & dustbathe in everything anyway, so I've given up keeping it as a definitive area (in a tyre). I might start it up as separate again when I next clean the aviary out & freshen things up, but won't put any effort into maintaining it that way (as I used to the first year we had quail).

FEED & WATER:
Many comments about feeding quail talk about high protein percentages being required. What I've found from both reading loads, and from my own experiences, is that our adult quail lay like the clappers on any complete layer feed for chooks. For the bulk of the year they can't be stopped laying, even on the most miserly of chook feeds ! I've also had no problems hatching quail when the adults are fed a typical complete layer feed for chooks. I prefer to put the adults on a higher protein & generally better quality chook feed when I know I'm going to be hatching, but when I have forgotten to organise things for that to happen, there's been no issues, so I don't worry about that very much if I forget... I just don't sell any birds hatched from eggs collected when the hens weren't on a top notch feed, and eat them myself instead, or keep them as layers if they lay a decent sized egg. More a precaution to ensure only the birds that I know have started off with A1 conditions in life (including at egg production date) get sold on to those looking for quail.

On the other hand, young quail, from hatch to adulthood (6 to 8 weeks) absolutely do need a significantly higher proportion of protein & I always feed the chicks accordingly. I may add to this post later about what I do when hatching & brooding chicks.

Water is something they take in almost in the same quantity that they excrete material from the other end. Fresh water, and lots of it, needs to be available to quail all day every day. I use those cup nipple waterer thingies (accurate description to come) attached to a 5 litre plastic container... two cups to approx. 8 or 10 birds.

I've become slack lately in doing so, but a handful of greenpick has always been appreciated by them. I used to throw some in weekly & might try to start that up again. They always seem that bit healthier when I regularly feed them some greenery. Broadleaf weeds are a favourite, as are long strands of grass held down with a brick so that they can pull bits off easily. Fruit & vegetable scraps are usually favoured, and give a bit of variety.

EGGS & LAYING BEHAVIOUR:
I've found that the number of eggs Japanese quail lay far exceed any expectations I ever had from them, and frankly I feed most of them to the chooks when I'm not hatching as they're like The Magic Pudding. The chooks rather like ye olde quail egg & just about fall over themselves to get them when I go to collect eggs from the aviary. Due to reading about prolapse in Japanese quail I've never wanted to risk "artificially" increasing their egg size by higher protein feed. Egg size from the quail I've acquired is in the range of 12 grams to 14 grams on bog standard chook layer feeds (weights are based on 2013 figures, when I last weighed them.. will update when I start measuring again). Weights when I'm feeding "the good stuff" for hatching times are generally around 15 gms average & even when hatching whilst the layers are on "normal" feeds, I avoid incubating any egg under 14 grms.

As stated, most of our non-incubated eggs get fed to the chooks. If we didn't have any chooks, the quail would provide enough eggs for our family to supply us pretty much all year round in place of chook eggs, and then some !

I've noted differing experiences of BYPers that keep Japanese quail in relation to when they lay & don't lay (season wise). Ours seem to have such a short period during Winter without laying eggs that I hardly notice it.. sometimes just a couple of weeks. Some have their quail not laying through most of Winter, which is not our experience. We don't supply artificial light or heat to our adult birds, and when I'm raising chicks they're off heat & light the moment they're fully feathered, which is sometimes as soon as 4 weeks old, and put in an outdoor pen with exposure to the elements (as well as a cosy, dry, woodshaving filled coop to go into if they wish.. although they seem to prefer the outdoors from the first day they're given the opportunity). I sometimes wonder if this early exposure to the elements helps them to adapt to outdoor living as adults, and why my layers stay laying longer (and starting up again sooner) than some. I haven't tracked them carefully enough to know if that's the case, and as I still have some of the original layers that were raised in "softer" way, I can't rely on that thought as being an accurate observation of reality.

Also oft quoted is that Japanese quail will lay where they happen to be at the time, ie. not in a set location. Our quail haven't read that requirement, and will mostly lay in the same spot in a pottery plant pot placed on its side. The pot has a hole in the base (the end once it's on its side) which allows light in. Quail like to have an escape route, and I'm yet to see one that's ever cosied up anywhere "snug", as you might see with a chook. A simple A-frame arrangement gives them safe shelter to hide or lay, whilst giving them the ability to escape if the need arises. I'm about to do a big cleanout of the aviary, and might trial a couple of little A-frame shelters when I refresh it.

BEHAVIOUR (WITH HUMANS):
Like our chook flock, I mostly let the quail be quail (to be fair, for the chook flock, I mostly let the chooks be chooks rather than quail). That is, I don't make any effort to handle them or befriend them. Despite this, they look forward to my visits to the aviary, when I refill their waterer & feeder once a week & throw their eggs outside the aviary for the chooks. Visits are daily for egg collection in the heat of summer, and only every couple of days through warm days of Spring & Autumn, except when I'm collecting for hatching purposes or collecting eggs for human consumption... always daily in that case.

They're unafraid of me, being familiar to them, and will get underfoot to the point of me needing to watch where I walk to avoid treading on them. About half of them will follow me about curiously if I rearrange anything in the aviary or add anything new, and immediately suss it out to see if it's edible or can be dustbathed in. Although mine are not fans of being picked up (as I've never handled them regularly) they're easy enough to pick up. Examining them is more difficult as they're less keen on being turned every which way to have legs, wings, cloaca & faces examined. A firm but gentle hand does wonders. They're quick to forgive & make the next "pickup" easier if I've treated them kindly, but have long memories if they didn't like how I prodded at them the previous time (this has occurred when a couple of my hens needed serious examination of lumps on joints on their legs).

Parts of the year when I'm in their world more often (eg. daily egg collections in Summer) they are very quick to bond with me closely & accept being picked up often if required. They're also more underfoot at those times. So if you want friendly quail, spend plenty of time with them being lovely to them & they'll repay the favour in spades.

HMMM... WHAT ELSE?
Healthwise, they've been many times hardier than I anticipated... with warnings of them getting all the same things that chooks can suffer from I'd been prepared to regularly worm them, treat them for external parasites, and watch out for coccidiosis in younger birds. None of those things has reared its head in the entire time I've had them, and they only have the aviary mesh between them & the chook flock. Much hardier & less work in that respect than I'd expected. I hear & read often of how easily quail chicks die, and how fragile they are. Quail chicks I've hatched I've found are much hardier & less work than chook chicks of the equivalent age. I can't account for why that might be, but that's been my experience. Any quail chicks here that haven't made it were assisted hatches... something I rarely (never say never) do anymore.

I can think of a gazillion more things that my journey with quail has provided to me, but will leave it at that unless anyone has a specific question.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 10:31 pm 
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Great info there winglet, Thanks.

My neighbour has just acquired some quail a few weeks ago and i hatch some for him when i have space in my incubator. He has some Japs and also some smaller white ones (all white with a few black spots mostly on the head) . I think they are bobwhites? I haven't researched into them much at this stage because i have been consumed by researching my dottes and my wifes silkies but i have to say.....damn them white ones are cute when they hatch. They look like those little decorations you can buy at easter time to decorate the kids hats for the school parades. Cutest things i have ever seen. I will have to get some pics of the next batch (if i can get them to stay still long enough) and post them up for you.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 9:21 pm 
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DottesnSilk wrote:
Great info there winglet, Thanks.

My neighbour has just acquired some quail a few weeks ago and i hatch some for him when i have space in my incubator. He has some Japs and also some smaller white ones (all white with a few black spots mostly on the head) . I think they are bobwhites? I haven't researched into them much at this stage because i have been consumed by researching my dottes and my wifes silkies but i have to say.....damn them white ones are cute when they hatch. They look like those little decorations you can buy at easter time to decorate the kids hats for the school parades. Cutest things i have ever seen. I will have to get some pics of the next batch (if i can get them to stay still long enough) and post them up for you.


I've not had experience with any quail other than the Japanese quail. I reckon most quail are prettier than Japs.. but they're all cute as buttons. Japanese quail come in a variety of colours, and I find some more visually appealing than others, both as chicks & as adults.

I know what you mean about trying to get photos... I've posted a video on BYP previously of some newly hatched Japanese quail chicks... you'd swear it was in fast forward mode if you didn't know how much the blighters sprint about from just an hour or so after hatching. Would love to see photos of the Bob White chicks next time you hatch some.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 11:47 pm 
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I have a few due to hatch in about a week. I'll make sure i get some pics but i can't promise they won't be blurry....lol.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 10:09 am 
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Thanks for that post Winglet. A great summary of the things you have learned.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 10:24 am 
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Great advice for a noob like me. Found it to be one of the most informative reading. More human than text book.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 5:38 pm 
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Great advice Winglet, and similar to my findings since starting on my own quail journey.

I do keep my quail on chick crumbles as I hatch fairly continuously. However I have had the problem with quail chicks being delicate and many dying in the first 48 hours. I just wish I knew why. Its never my S-necked quail who are invariably hardy little buggers despite their funny looks, but some just simply fail to thrive. If you ever work out what your secret is, please let us know!

Otherwise I agree, they lay like the clappers and we love their eggs! Tasty little morsels, really nice hard boiled in salads. Don't mind a roasted quail as an entree either.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 9:59 pm 
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Cheers Everyone.. bozie, you shouldn't encourage me ! :rofl:

Hmmm... thinking out loud here about some of the other stuff...

FEEDING FOR BREEDING
I feed the flock decent chook layer feed if I ever plan ahead far enough before the "Maybe I'll stick some eggs in the incubator" moment. Generally I give them Country Heritage Layer Mash (for chooks) commencing a couple of weeks before I collect eggs. I find that they gobble up dry mash feeds much more enthusiastically than crumble, pellets, or grain mixes. Being such tiny birds compared to chooks it makes logical sense really. I once fed them a Game Bird Breeder feed (one of the Barastoc feeds) but it didn't give me better results than the Country Heritage Layer Mash. I prefer no coccidiostat in my feeds for all my birds, instead monitoring closely in case of potential problems & using husbandry methods & quick actions to treat with Baycox if I think they need it. I can't recall having ever treated a batch of quail chicks for signs of coccidiosis... if I have it would have been unusual.

EGG COLLECTION FOR HATCHING THE LITTLE CUTIES
In my experience most of my quail's eggs are of similar shape all year round. Size seems to be a bigger variable between hens, and colour & pattern of the eggshells, too. I always select larger eggs for hatching, however someone on BYP (I apologise to whomever it was as I've forgotten only through my own memory issues, nothing personal) finds that the larger quail for eating that they hatch come from smaller eggs, and not from the larger eggs as some might anticipate.

EGG STORAGE BEFORE INCUBATING
When collecting eggs for hatching, due to research on the magical interweb telling me that it was a good idea (and it's turned out to be precisely that), I store them in a sealed plastic zip-lock bag to keep the humidity level high until I'm ready to set them. No added water, and not sprayed with a mist of water or anything like that, just placed in a little zip-lock bag & the zip zipped... zippity zip ! Each day I only open the bag to add new eggs, and just plonk the bag down again "upside down" compared to the last time I opened it. Plonk might be too strong a word... placed carefully to avoid breakages is more accurate. I leave the bag on the kitchen benchtop if it's not mid-summer (we rent a lovely old house that stays fairly cool due to high ceilings & lack of modern "sealed in" materials in its construction). Remember to tell any other people in the house that they're for hatching & not eating. History tells us that failure to notify others in the house of the potential setting of eggs will result in them suddenly disappearing. You will then be asked at some point, as you hunt around to see where you're SURE you put the bag last time, "What are you looking for?" & the ensuing conversation will result in you realising that your incubation plans will be starting several days later than originally planned. Turning was something I used to do several times a day but experience has taught me that if I forget to turn them it's no big deal, and I've successfully hatched after several days of collecting where I've not even remembered to turn the bag over.. just the picking up of the bag, opening it, and adding new eggs, has been enough to "turn" them.

READY ! SET !
After no more than a week, often only 3 or 4 days, I open the zip lock bag & have a good sniff of the eggs before I incubate. Why? Well, one time I collected for just over a week, and it was very hot in the middle of summer... mould had formed on the eggs in their little closed plastic palace. Peee-ew ! The smell just about knocked me out as I unzipped the bag. Threw those eggs out & started again. Now I always have a big sniff to ensure no signs of mould starting. No problems since, but it's a habit I'll continue with "just in case".

I've hatched quail in a foam incubator, with fan & auto turner, but no auto humidity. Lots of pre-incubation reading in the Incubation & Rearing section of BYP gave me the tools to get quail hatching in it with a better result than one would expect given the copious threads about how terrible such incubators are. Not a brilliant hatch compared to what I get now in our King Suro incubator **sigh** (that's my sigh of contentment... I love our King Suro with auto everything), but certainly a very good hatch for someone who took most of the info. I need from threads in BYP & from the person we purchased the incubator from. The most useful thread I found was one written by chookyinoz specifically about foam incubators... (link to that thread to be added when I go looking some time).

With our magical, marvellous King Suro (can you tell I like it yet?) I use the good ol' chook incubation settings.. nothing special for hatching quail there. I did a hatch or two or three with marginally higher temperature (maybe a few tenths of a degree higher) but it didn't make a difference for the hatch rates I was getting or the health of the chicks. Nothing adverse, but no benefit, so not worth it for me to muck around with the settings between quail & chooks (as hatching both is fun). Humidity I pay little heed to. I used to carefully make sure that I raised the humidity for both chook & quail incubation in the last few days. Now I just leave it at around 55% (ish) throughout. I've played with the humidity level a bit for both chook & quail hatches, and anywhere from 50% to 60% seems to work fine where we live. I often hatch both quail & chooks in the same setting, with the quail eggs set at the same time, or a few days after, or stuff up timing & put them in mid-chook incubation. Quail eggs take from 15 to 18 days to hatch, and chook eggs around 21 days, with the count starting at zero when you put them in, and Day 1 occurring approximately 24 hours after the core of the egg reaches incubation temperature. Pre-heating the incubator is a given, by the way.. with the foam one I used to give it a full day & with the King Suro a couple of hours has been plenty to get it up & running.

GO, GO, GO !!
Keeping the incubator closed throughout any incubation is always preferred, other than when you must open it to turn eggs or adjust humidity through addition of water, or when you want to candle eggs. The King Suro & other fully automatic incubators avoid the need to open them except for candling. If you can resist opening it, then RESIST ! Although I candle chook eggs at least twice when incubating, I never bother candling quail eggs. I can't see a thing anyway, so I don't bother... I wonder if that's one of the things that helps with my quail hatches & the chicks being pretty hardy, now that I've thought that out loud. :hmmm: I am however a complete sucker if I haven't hatched for a while & can't help but open the incubator probably more times than I should once the first ones start hatching. I use the excuse that I want to stick the quail into their brooder as soon as they're dry. :hiding

Letting them run roughshod over the unhatched eggs in the incubator does wonders for their unhatched siblings. Letting them roughhouse all over each other stimulates the unhatched ones to get on with coming into the world, and gets their muscles & tendons working after being cramped in an egg for their entire lives ! I used to think of them as fragile, and get them out of the brooder in batches to protect the later hatched chicks from their older, earlier hatched buddies. Not anymore. The quicker they're all getting roughed about the better. Japanese quail tend to all hatch in a short window from the one setting, in comparison to chooks. Rarely does anyone hatch outside about a 24 hour window in my experience. This seems to be the general rule of thumb that others on BYP have occur in their experiences, too.

EAT, DRINK..
Unlike for chooks, who I don't bother giving food or water to until they're in a brooder, I put a small shallow container of water in the incubator... yes, you heard that right.. so that early hatched chicks can get to water if they want it. I put a small piece of non-slip mat in the container so that they can sip at the little bits of water in the "holes"... it's just to get them those early birds through the first day if they need a drink... I never make them drink, but just give them the option. Humidity goes all over the place once the first egg pips, which I pay no attention to. I also scatter a bit of feed for those early birds that fancy giving it a go. Always Country Heritage Organic Chick Starter / Grower feed at our place now... again, I've tried Game Bird Chick Starter feed & frankly they did better on the lower protein Country Heritage stuff... probably because they eat it constantly (unlike the Game Bird stuff which I've had several hatches struggle on) so they have a permanently full belly. I've also found that having a hearty appetite also has them drinking plenty of water. The full bellies & plenty of hydration seem to suit their early lives well here.

I started putting water & feed in the incubator for quail hatches for a few reasons. Firstly, observing them in the incubator, I noticed that quail chicks peck at the latest hatched chicks a lot. At first I thought it was a "have a go at the youngest" thing, but watching closely I soon worked out that they weren't so much pecking the younger chicks, but trying to grab at their wet down. Secondly, somewhere in the magical land of the interweb I read about the first 24 hours of quail life being a significant factor in their ongoing vigour & vitality... the earlier they have access to feed & water, the better they do. Lastly.. um.. what was it again? Oh, I remember.. I figure that they're such tiny birds, that if you exponentially alter time to allow for their tiny bodies & relatively short life, then the first 24 hours of a quail chick's life is several day of a chook chick's. Now, chook chicks will often not eat or drink in the first 48 hours of life, as they're under mum's feathery skirt & she won't let the poor desperate things go exploring until she's good & ready to take them out there. They have enough yolk after hatching to get them safely through those first couple of days. Quail don't have as long as that, I figured. In our parallel chook / quail universe, I figure 48 hours in a chook's life after hatch is maybe 12 hours at most in a quail's. Add to that that a quail's metabolism is much faster than a chook's, and I reckon it's safe to reduce that 12 hours even further. So... that's why I started doing it, and it works for me.

AND BE MERRY !
My brooder is usually set up with the following careful planning.
1. Forget that it's coming up to hatching day, and wake up to see a little quail chick in the incubator.
2. Arrange eating & drinking as listed at "Eat, Drink" & head to work.
3. Get out of work exactly on time (a rare occurrence for me) so I can get home watch the quail chicks !
4. Arrive home & tip all the litter out the brooder because I haven't got around to it since the last lot were shifted out of it (sometimes months prior).
5. Realise that it really needs a proper wash out & scrub, but don't have time for it to dry (it's mostly wood) if I hose it out.
6. Get some hot water, add a smidge of soap, and locate a scrubbing brush (we have a couple especially for poultry purposes).
7. Try not to get distracted by the rapidly hatching & very chirpy quail whilst trying to set up the brooder... this bit's the hardest part !
8. Dip the scrubbing brush (it's one of those 99 cent ones from Ikea... bless you Ikea) into the hot, soapy water & scrub away until the brooder looks passable.... no poop visible on wood & perspex at front is fully transparent again (ie. shiny & clean).
9. Set the hose attachment to "fan" or flat" & hose off the soapy water, making sure to not point it near / towards the electric lightbulb holder.
10. If hot enough, leave brooder in the sunshine to dry... if not, get a towel & press on the wood to get the easily shiftable moisture out of it & then consider if the hairdryer needs to come out.
11. DRY the brooder like the quail lives depend on it... which they may well do.... dry it to within an inch of its life.
12. Realise I've no hope of getting it as dry as I want it to be before the quail need to go in, and remember that I have a really hot bulb that dries the interior of the brooder to within an inch of its life in just a couple of hours.
13. Plug the brooder in, with said hot bulb in, and then remember that I have to watch carefully so that the wood doesn't catch alight.
14. Figure a few minutes to check on the quail will be safe.
15. Smell burning ! Jog back to the brooder & notice some newly blackened wood on the inside of the brooder near the bulb.
16. Smile that the brooder is getting dry so quickly, but open the lid to avoid the wood reaching ignition temperature, and stay MUCH closer to the brooder until it's dry.
17. Collect all other items required for the brooder setup... the much safer, less hot, "normal" bulb / fresh woodshavings / a glazed pottery plant pot with hole in the base (scrubbed clean if not already clean) / a few bricks (there are always some reasonably clean ones lying about the place here) / a freshly cleaned chick waterer.
18. Go count how many quail have hatched... tell Mr Winglet every time a new one pips, or hatches, or dries, or does something funny (very often for quail chicks).
19. Ignore Mr Winglet's protestations at hearing about the chicks... shortly followed up with having to listen to all of his updates every time a new one pips, or hatches, or dries, or does something funny.
20. With brooder now dry inside put a few bricks inside "flat" & another one or two sideways so that quail can run through the holes, add wood shavings to half the height of the "flat" bricks & jam wood shavings inside any holes that would otherwise be deathtraps to young quail falling down into them like unused wells, fill waterer & put on top of the bricks in the middle (I used to put marbles in the moat, but no longer bother), scatter chick feed on the wood shavings (big pile between heat source & bricks that waterer sits on, and plenty more scattered around the edge of the bricks.. on the shavings... and some almost direct under the heat source), and put the pot onto its side & side-on to the heat/light source... close enough to warm up from the heat & positioned so that the quail can go inside & keep warm (not overheat) but keep out of the light if they choose to do so.
21. Fetch quail in handfuls & put in the brooder directly under the heat source, regardless of how long since they hatched. Continue to fetch handfuls of quail & move them to the brooder until all hatched quail have been shifted. Put back the last few quail that hatched, from the brooder to the incubator, as you realise this will help the last few hatch & will give the ones you moved a little more time to build up strength (they're probably less than an hour hatched !).

OR

Have the brooder set up ahead of time if you're organised. :hiding

bozie, I blame you for the length of this addendum.. I did say you shouldn't encourage me. ;-)


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 10:56 pm 
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Nice work. This is turning into one of the most comprehensive guides to owning quail that I've read.

Thanks Winglet.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 11:04 pm 
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Chicken07 wrote:
Nice work. This is turning into one of the most comprehensive guides to owning quail that I've read.

Thanks Winglet.


No Worries Chicken07.

I figure that the very careful planning of the brooder setup, in particular, is a definite must have for any one wanting to hatch quail. ;-)
(Seriously though.. I really must clean out the brooder BEFORE I stick eggs in the incubator next time).

Still have a few other things up my sleeve to add, once I have photos and/or video to upload.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 10:19 pm 
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I have added a link to the quail Index - great stuff!

NellyG

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2014 2:06 am 
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Hatchling
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Location: Woodville, Derby, United Kingdom
Winglet

Have you thought about writing a book or maybe get all this converted to a pdf for download (gonna copy and paste when on pc next)

Cleared up a number of my questions and I eagerly await your next installment :)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2014 6:28 am 
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If you're going to print, there should be a print view button at the top of the topic.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2014 11:11 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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bozie wrote:
Winglet

Have you thought about writing a book or maybe get all this converted to a pdf for download (gonna copy and paste when on pc next)

Cleared up a number of my questions and I eagerly await your next installment :)


Very sweet of you bozie. :th

Not sure if you're read The Adventures of Winglet & the Bantam Menace thread... a few have suggested the same in there over the years. My response is as it always has been, although I will elaborate a little further.. to avoid posting one of my long-winded chapters to answer a simple question here , I will create a new thread with the answer... viewtopic.php?f=3&p=755036#p755036


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:44 pm 
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Champion Bird
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DottesnSilk wrote:
I have a few due to hatch in about a week. I'll make sure i get some pics but i can't promise they won't be blurry....lol.


I found a couple of pics of the very first white quail i hatched. It is straddled over a cotton bud in one of the pics to give an idea of size. It was still fluffing up so it sat still long enough for a couple of pics. Does it remind you of those Easter decorations?


Attachments:
File comment: In my hand
P7310053_resized.jpg
P7310053_resized.jpg [ 792.67 KiB | Viewed 3639 times ]
File comment: In the hatcher all alone
P7310052_resized.jpg
P7310052_resized.jpg [ 1.2 MiB | Viewed 3639 times ]

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There's silk in my name but dottes are my game. Amateur breeder of standard blue laced red wyandottes.

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