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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 10:11 am 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Melbourne Vic
How would they cope with Australian wilderness?
It's Victorian high country, a lot of forests, bushes,blackberries, plenty of hiding sports.
Would they menage to breed and live their wild lifestyle?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 10:16 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Hopefully not or they would become another feral to challenge the native species and feed the foxes.




"Male Ring-necked Pheasants may harass other ground-nesting birds, such as the Gray Partridge and the Greater Prairie-Chicken. Female pheasants sometimes lay their own eggs in these birds’ nests. This may explain why some male pheasants have been seen chasing away male prairie-chickens and courting females—the pheasants may have been raised in prairie-chicken nests and imprinted on the wrong species".

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Rin ... ifehistory


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 1:33 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Melbourne Vic
Are you talking about Victoria?
Where are those prairie-chichen live?- not in Australia
Grey patrige is not Australian bird too.
Ringnecks are not clarified as a pest anywhere in the world, why they would be here?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 4:25 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Because it only takes a few things to go right for an introduced species to become a pest.

Ringnecks might not be a problem elsewhere at the moment, but given their behaviour as noted by Sue, they have the potential to become one, as does any species being introduced somewhere where they don't belong.

I think it's incredibly reckless to release any animal/animals into an environment in which they aren't native. The likelihood of it resulting in problems may vary with species, but it's bordering on idiotic to even consider it. What IF it caused a problem? What would you do then? How do you undo the damage? Honestly...why risk it?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 6:37 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Location: ACT area
The example quoted is an American one - the result of Ringnecks being introduced from Asia in the 1800's.

cane toads, bumble bees, camels, european wasps, indian miners, sparrows, starlings, roosters, rabbits, foxes, wild pigs, feral dogs and cats, brumbies, introduced ducks, carp and the list goes on and these are just the fauna.
They all cost our native animals and our pockets. WE DO NOT need another potential, problem. We need to learn from our mistakes, not contemplate repeating themt

Wild Ringneck Pheasants are culled on Rottnest Island with the aim of eliminating them because they are considered a feral species. Victoria also lists them as a potential pest.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 10:37 pm 
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Fiesty Fowl
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I do hope you are not seriously thinking about doing this. As an academic question, yes they would most likely adapt, breed and increase. And compete successfully with native wildlife for habitat area.

Aside from being irresponsible it is illegal to release non-native species in or near National Parks.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 5:33 am 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Melbourne Vic
No,
I was watching the videos on YouTube, about releasing ringneck pheasants for hunting. I'm just curious, why i don't see them here.
Honestly i don't see them as a pests.
Bigger pests are corella or cockatoos, they easily demolish farmer crops in a short period of time .


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 8:43 am 
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Fiesty Fowl
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Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 12:20 pm
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Location: Thirlmere nsw
That was probably the same thing that the English thought when they released Rabbits and Foxs for hunting. And we all know how that went. I would think that they would quickly become a pest and compete with eg brush turkeys, malee fowl, lyer birds to name a few. In America they do release for hunting and i think they are already getting a pest problem. If only males were released at least breeding would be out of the question but they could still harass the native fauna . In Australia you only need to also look at the India miner bird, a serious pest, they will biuld their nest directly on top of live Rosella chicks to take over the nest, i see it where i work all the time The ndia miner birds driving Eastern Rosellas out of nests :aaah! . Its bad enough when the government stuffs it up, cane toads :doh .without anybody this day and age being careless.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 9:17 am 
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Proud Rooster
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Any introduced species not native to Australia has the potential to go feral and become a pest.
The instances of plant, bird and animal introductions already make for an extensive list of pest species.
Besides those already listed we can add many water plants ,numerous garden plants ,cactus, camels, pigs, deer, cage birds, water buffalo, cattle, horses, donkeys all of which have been introduced and turned feral.
It does not even have to be an intentional release, many domestic animals have by accident or incident escaped and a new feral population can develop.
Not only here but in many places world wide this has happened.
You only have to look at the consequences of cyclone Katrina in the USA where small individual boxes of juvenile Burmese Pythons housed in secure breeding facilities were destroyed and the pythons escaped into wetlands and swamps to now be a huge pest and threat to native and domestic animals.
All they needed was a warm moist climate and no natural predators to multiply out of all proportion and now be almost impossible to eradicate.
This is exactly what can happen at any time without due diligence and care.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 9:33 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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gorang80 wrote:
No,
Bigger pests are corella or cockatoos, they easily demolish farmer crops in a short period of time .

Yes, but at least those birds are native. In that example, we are the 'pests' (yes I know that's a simplified argument though).

The impact of an invasive species goes far, far beyond just the agricultural/economic effects. You've got delicate ecosystems and species to think about, among others.

Actually, one other thing you'd have to consider is what legislation and restrictions would be put in place on game bird owners if something like what you are talking about was to happen. You can already see it with import restrictions with birds/exotic rodents/etc, and state bans on pet species like rabbits in QLD. If a pheasant owner released some into the wild with the aim of establishing a population for hunting or what have you, they may well just end up shooting themselves in their foot and restricting their ability to own them in future.

It's just madness, so it's good to know it's purely a thought exercise and you aren't actually considering doing it.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 10:22 am 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Melbourne Vic
No way,
I keep the pheasants my self ,but would never release them. I really enjoy the pheasants, but safe in my avary! Hahah
I'm not a hunter either. Just a thought?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:02 am 
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Fiesty Fowl
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gorang80 wrote:
No way, .... Just a thought?

Thoughts are good. Gives us all a memory jog and sharpens awareness. Domestic ducks are a bit of a problem in some areas - people "kindly" let their surplus males free on waterways, they breed with wild ducks, it's just not a good outcome for wild populations.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:38 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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PossumCorner wrote:
Domestic ducks are a bit of a problem in some areas - people "kindly" let their surplus males free on waterways, they breed with wild ducks, it's just not a good outcome for wild populations.

That reminds me of something I read on a different forum. People were actually encouraging another person to release their ducks into the wild. One of the more ridiculous reasons given was that the local ducks were 'ugly' and the released birds would improve the view... :shock:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:05 pm 
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Fiesty Fowl
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You even look at that forum?? In my circle it's "wash your mouth" if it is even mentioned. Fair enough too, what a nasty lot.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2016 7:27 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Location: Victoria
PossumCorner wrote:
You even look at that forum?? In my circle it's "wash your mouth" if it is even mentioned. Fair enough too, what a nasty lot.

Lol, it was when I first started my adventures with poultry, I got banned early on and never returned. The idiocy of the comment about releasing the ducks stuck with me though. As did this plan I read about years ago http://www.smh.com.au/environment/anima ... 1jubj.html The lack of awareness and/or lack of regard for Australia's environment and ecosystem is just astounding sometimes. Thankfully the fox plan never succeeded!


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