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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 9:38 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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New to chicken ownership - just wondering what to do with chicken manure - I understand you can't put it directily onto the garden because it will burn the plants or something?

What do most people do with theirs?

Someone told me how they mix chicken poo with water and then water the plants with it - but is their any special "recipe" you need to follow to do this, i.e. what part poo what part water, and how long do you have to leave it before you can use it.?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 9:56 pm 
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Golden Robin
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i tend to put my chicken's manure into the compost heap and let it break down for a couple of months.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:25 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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I just let it dry out a few months, then chuck it over my veggies.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:45 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Narre Warren South, Melbourne
I put it & all the coop sweepings directly on my potatoes (I grow them in cages). I don't age it - just put it directly on. They *love* it. I haven't had a problem yet with the manure burning the plants (possibly because there's so much straw as well) & it all breaks down into lovely friable compost, which gets spread round the garden once I've harvested the potatoes.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:35 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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One thing my dad does do here is, he collects all the waste on the floor (concrete) and put it into small bins adds water and lets it sit for about 2-3 weeks to break down a bit.... then just add and water into veggies.

I do this to now and believe me its a great fertiliser !

Joe

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 12:07 am 
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Dapper Duck
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J&D Chicks wrote:
One thing my dad does do here is, he collects all the waste on the floor (concrete) and put it into small bins adds water and lets it sit for about 2-3 weeks to break down a bit.... then just add and water into veggies.

I do this to now and believe me its a great fertiliser !

Joe



I think this might have been what my friend was talking about - how much water for how much manure?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:35 am 
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Clever Cockerel
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I put a thread up a little while ago about my connifers dieing... and it was due to the coop clean-out material putting the pH out too much. So we compost it all with our grass clippings. As the clippings break down they take nitrogen out of the soil/garden so the chook poo should equal it out and also the pH should be more towards neutral than acidic. Thats the plan!
However we have found our lemon, lime and orange trees have thrived on straight coop material as they need plenty of nutrients.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 8:43 am 
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Flock Master
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If the grass clippings are green, they have enough nitrogen to break down without drawing extra from the environment. Green clippings are often used in compost to provide nitrogen to the pile.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 9:14 am 
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Clever Cockerel
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Ah ok, so as dry mulch breaks down it takes nitrogen out, but green clippings dont need to. Got it :thumbs:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 10:22 am 
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Newbie
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J&D Chicks wrote:
One thing my dad does do here is, he collects all the waste on the floor (concrete) and put it into small bins adds water and lets it sit for about 2-3 weeks to break down a bit.... then just add and water into veggies.

I do this to now and believe me its a great fertiliser !

Joe


Thanks for the tip, I will try this one :thumbs:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 11:51 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
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Location: Outer Western Suburb of Melbourne, Vic
Do this somewhere that the smell is not going to be an issue, not under a window or near the back door, maybe up in the corner of the vegie patch or down the back near the shed.

I have a steel rubbish bin that has a "lockable lid" (I have three young children that love to help, so for me sealable/lockable is essential.), fill it about 1/3 with whatever manure you like, in this case poultry, then fill it up with water, get a stick and stir it up. Close the lid, and let it sit, every day or so give it a stir for about 2-3 weeks so it can "mature", it is going to be really stinky so don't put your head over it as you stir.

I add a margarine container of the liquid to a watering can and then fill up the watering can with water, so diluting my half a litre of liquid gold to about 10 litres. I use this mix on anything leafy, like lettuce, spinach, silver beet, or heavy feeders like zucchini, and pumpkins. After applying, I then give it another good water as the mix can cause burning on some plant leaves. Don't use it o hot days, again as burning can occur. It is also brilliant on flowering annuals, and diluted down further OK for your pot plants, not sure about ferns though?

When the liquid level has gotten down to the "chunky bits", you can top it up again with more water and mix it up. Then after another week of maturing you can then take out two containers to 10 litres, as it is not as strong as the first lot. When down to the chunky bits this time, I dig a hole in the vegie patch and empty the rubbish bin into it. Cover it up and put a marker on the spot, this is where next season you plant your pumpkins or zucchinis, and they will go crazy!

Repeat the process.



Ron (It is going to be stinky, but your plants will love you.)

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:16 pm 
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Golden Cockatoo
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Yes, citrus trees seem to thrive on it and fresh doesn't seem to bother ours. Otherwise we add it to fallow garden beds and leave for a couple of months before planting. Of we let it sit in a large pot for a few months and then use it. We get lots but use it all.

NellyG

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 12:56 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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I put it on the citrus and chilli plants straight from the coop.. and the dogs help us remove it straight away (into their guts).

Now, we put it in the compost with grass clippings and my pumpkin uses the compost bin as it's personal feeding trough.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:21 pm 
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Champion Bird
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When my mother had chooks she used the water-soak method. She used a big plastic rubbish bin with a lid, put the manure and bedding in it, and covered it with water. As long as the solid stuff stays under the water, it almost doesn't matter about quantities. Once the bedding gets waterlogged it will stay under by itself, but until then use a stick to push it down occasionally like Ron said.

Mum would just keep adding more manure and more water as long as she could fit it in the container. Then she would scoop some out and dilute it when watering the garden. Fortunately Mum had a big garden because that bin sure did stink!

One time my Dad decided to rearrange stuff in the yard and tipped out the whole bin of disgusting stinky stuff. Mum was furious! :lol: But all the solid bits rotted away really fast and for a long time after you could see exactly where it had landed and where all the high-nutrient liquid had run. Dad had to mow that patch way more than any other part of the lawn because the grass grew like nothing he had ever seen before and was a totally different shade of rich green. (Of course all visitors would comment on the one lush patch of grass and Mum took every chance to tell them how mad she still was with Dad for tipping out her precious manure! :aaargh: )

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:48 pm 
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Champion Bird
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We use what we can, only having a suburban block. The rest gets put into old feed bags and brought down to the local community garden, where they use it... better than putting it in the green bin for rubbish day.
Christine

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