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 Post subject: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:23 am 
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Hatchling
Hatchling

Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:04 pm
Posts: 9
Has anyone used lights to bring hens onto lay? My RIR moulted before winter and have not seen an egg since. Keen to get breeding!! Cheers


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:46 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
You need to extend day length to about 16 hours & the intensity of light needs to be enough to trigger the response. That's brighter than the brightest moonlight but not hugely so. If you can read the fine print on a newspaper then thats probably bright enough.


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 9:51 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
Posts: 6704
Location: ACT area
Read a paper ages ago, assessing the suitability of different types of light - incandescent, flourescent, halogen, LED but can't remember the results. Anyone have the answers?


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:13 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
Sue, its to do with the wavelength of the light. Natural sunlight is a mix of many wavelengths. Relative to sunlight, incandescents tend to have more light at the red end of the spectrum, fluorescent at the blue end and LED will be very pure at whatever wavelength they produce. The worry with LEDs is that if you get a wavelength that chickens are non-responsive to, it wont work. Whereas the other two types give a mix, albeit biased one way or another. LEDs are of course much cheaper on electricity.


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:22 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
Effect of combinations of monochromatic LED light color on the performance and behavior of laying hens.
By: Hassan, M. R. ; Sultana, S. ; Choe, H. S. ; Ryu, K. S.
Journal of Poultry Science
Volume: 51
Issue: 3
Pages: 321-326
Published: 2014

Abstract

The present study evaluated the effect of monochromatic and combinations of light emitting diode light color on the performance and behavior of laying hens. At 12 weeks of age, 600 Hy-line Brown pullets were randomly divided into eight lighting treatments with three replicates of 25 birds in each room. The lightning was set-up as follows; white (W, control; 16 h/d), red (R; 618-635 nm; 16 h/d), green (G; 515-535 nm; 16 h/d), blue (B; 455-470 nm; 16 h/d), red -> green (R -> G; 14 h -> 2 h/d), red -> blue (R -> B; 14 h -> 2 h/d), red -> green -> blue (R -> G -> B; 12 h -> 2 h -> 2 h/d) and red -> blue -> green (R -> B -> G; 12 h -> 2 h -> 2 h/d) light treatments. The light colors significantly influenced egg production, which was higher for the combination R -> G (89.56%) and monochromatic R (87.34%) and lower in the G (85.26%) and B (83.75%) light treatments. Conversely, egg weight was remarkably heavier in the B and G light treatments than those of monochromatic R and combination treatments. Concurrently, better feed conversion ratio was found for the combination R -> G -> B and R -> G and the monochromatic R light treatment. Egg shells were significantly pigmented by the combinations of R -> B -> G and R -> G -> B. Furthermore, egg shell breaking strength increased following the G treatment. Higher frequencies of ground pecking, ground scratching, and tail wagging were observed in the R group and these behaviors were less frequent in the B groups. Birds under G and B lights spent a longer time perching. These results suggest that a combination of R -> G and monochromatic R light enhanced egg production. In contrast, R light activated the bird's movement, whereas B light decreased movement, and birds spent a longer time perching.

AND ANOTHER ONE

Red light is necessary to activate the reproductive axis in chickens independently of the retina of the eye.
By: Baxter, M. ; Joseph, N. ; Osborne, V. R. ; Bedecarrats, G. Y.
Poultry Science
Volume: 93
Issue: 5
Pages: 1289-1297
DOI: 10.3382/ps.2013-03799
Published: 2014

Abstract

Photoperiod is essential in manipulating sexual maturity and reproductive performance in avian species. Light can be perceived by photoreceptors in the retina of the eye, pineal gland, and hypothalamus. However, the relative sensitivity and specificity of each organ to wavelength, and consequently the physiological effects, may differ. The purpose of this experiment was to test the impacts of light wavelengths on reproduction, growth, and stress in laying hens maintained in cages and to determine whether the retina of the eye is necessary. Individual cages in 3 optically isolated sections of a single room were equipped with LED strips providing either pure green, pure red or white light (red, green, and blue) set to 10 lx (hens levels). The involvement of the retina on mediating the effects of light wavelength was assessed by using a naturally blind line (Smoky Joe) of chickens. Red and white lights resulted in higher estradiol concentrations after photostimulation, indicating stronger ovarian activation, which translated into a significantly lower age at first egg when compared with the green light. Similarly, hens maintained under red and white lights had a longer and higher peak production and higher cumulative egg number than hens under green light. No significant difference in BW gain was observed until sexual maturation. However, from 23 wk of age onward, birds exposed to green light showed higher body growth, which may be the result of their lower egg production. Although corticosterone levels were higher at 20 wk of age in hens under red light, concentrations were below levels that can be considered indicative of stress. Because no significant differences were observed between blind and sighted birds maintained under red and white light, the retina of the eye did not participate in the activation of reproduction. In summary, red light was required to stimulate the reproductive axis whereas green light was ineffective, and the effects of stimulatory wavelengths do not appear to require a functional retina of the eye.


Last edited by andrewschooks on Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:24 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:10 pm
Posts: 4579
Location: SE Qld
So it seems if you are using LEDs to bring chickens into lay, you are better off using ones at the Red end of the spectrum.


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 2:40 pm 
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Showy Hen
Showy Hen

Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2014 12:31 pm
Posts: 140
Very interesting.


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 Post subject: Re: Using Lights
PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 1:59 pm 
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Hatchling
Hatchling

Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:04 pm
Posts: 9
Excellent, cheers for that!! That's a great help!!


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