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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:49 am 
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Star anise is another one that gets played with here cathy, just in case you get bored!!! Not likely though you busy lady.
Should be superchicken07 :lol: :thumbs:
Cheers julie

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:51 am 
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Thanks Julie. :lol: Another one to add onto the list of herbs to tackle. :thumbs:

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:26 pm 
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Actually cathy given what you have found out about cinnamon(I been spruiking it for ages!!) is it worth a footnote at the end of the rickets diet?
As an example I had half a dozen not quite laying age in a pen looking not sick but bit flat, lazy and pale, like the start of something.
I had only just wormed them last week so too early for follow up. Wild birds have been chased out of there a lot lately so I have been keeping a close eye on them.
Anyways I made up ruff's recipe of heated milk, then add acv til it curdles and then use really good quality wholemeal bread to soak it up.
To this I added cinnamon and star anise and probiotic powder... Not sure if the vinegar would kill it but chucked it in anyway.
That was last night and today they are running around like idiots. I always add cinnamon to any sickies feed as it seems to help them get more out of it... Even roudybush shock horror!!
Cheers julie

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:13 pm 
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In some cases cinnamon may be a good additive to the ricket's diet, especially if there is no tetracycline being given and there is a mild gastro upset.

The ricket's sticky has been posted by Meredith and quoted from Sandy, so I'm reluctant to make any changes. I occasionally correct a typo in my own or Mike's posts (coz I don't think he'd mind :wink: ), but I would not like to change the content of the post. I can add a little comment by me in the following post in a different colour regarding the use of cinnamin as a calmative for gastro upset if you think it's appropriate.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:38 pm 
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new feathers wrote:
Star anise is another one that gets played with here cathy, just in case you get bored!!! Not likely though you busy lady.
Should be superchicken07 :lol: :thumbs:
Cheers julie


I agree - she's just amazing.

I've just done a very basic search on star anise. This is a summary of the common themes/claims from across the web - will add reputable links when I find 'em.

It's often prescribed for digestive upsets. The FDA apparently recommended it as a treatment for colic in human babies (as a tea) BUT a more recent study has now demonstrated toxicity issues with this treatment (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14619794 and http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/291/5/562 and http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=24284). That's worth following up in its own right - this page (http://www.naturalstandard.com/index-abstract.asp?create-abstract=/monographs/herbssupplements/patient-staranise.asp) claims there are differences between varieties of star anise (Japanese and Chinese) and it's the Japanese that causes problems.
I found one page that claimed it was effective against canker/mouth ulcers in humans and that it's one of the ingredients in Tamiflu (http://www.teatreewonders.com/star-anise-for-canker-sores.html - this is NOT a reputable page but a place to start).
Star anise oil has demonstrated anti-fungal properties (against Aspergillus): http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/39/4/818
Star anise extracts may have antioxidant, anti-elastase, and anti-inflammatory properties: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19819825
It MAY have some effectiveness against rhumatoid arthritis.
It's commonly found in conjunction with clove oil, which does have demonstrated arthritic and other properties.
I _think_ this article is talking about anti-carcinogenic potential, but it's got lots of long words, by which I know it's a reputable scientific article ;) (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T56-4P0DJT7-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=1fd64ec473a94a1924bf77f2d8c32144)

I haven't found a single thing on its use in general animal medicine or management at this stage, let alone poultry; only where it's been tested on animals prior to humans.

No, wait: it MIGHT be effective against "screw worm" infestations in hooved mammals: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/esa/jee/1926/00000019/00000003/art00022.
It may also have a similar effect on fruit fly: http://rdo.psu.ac.th/sjst/ejournal/journal/30-5/0125-3395-30-5-667-672.pdf (now that COULD be of interest to organic gardener types, if it does work).

Oh, and it tastes excellent when COOKED with chicken ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:51 pm 
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Does it have other names? Nothing under Star Anise here, but I might have to search under something else.

I think I'll have to let you search on that one for the moment Info, while I finish off Chamomile. I'm getting dizzy.

Find whatever you can and post it here. I'll sort through it when I can and send you a draft post for some feedback.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:53 pm 
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I knew about the anti fungal anti viral part of star anise but not the other stuff. Further back up the page I put a link to herbs for health they say it has a part of it extracted for tamiflu too.
Wonder if you could season them from the inside before slaughter... Not the sick ones should never eat sick ones.
Cheers julie

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:59 pm 
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One thing to look out for is research that has been on animals, rather than 'in vitro'. If something has been found to be antibacterial or antifungal in a petri dish, that doesn't mean that it's going to have the same effect in the body of an animal. If I can only find research that's 'in vitro' I'll note it, but I won't recommend it for treating an infection, for instance. It takes quite a lot of time reading through all the studies to see what's relevant and what's not.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:26 pm 
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Chicken07 wrote:
Does it have other names? Nothing under Star Anise here, but I might have to search under something else.

I think I'll have to let you search on that one for the moment Info, while I finish off Chamomile. I'm getting dizzy.

Find whatever you can and post it here. I'll sort through it when I can and send you a draft post for some feedback.


Hmm. It's a cooking spice, pretty common. Latin names: Illicium verum or Illicium anisatum, Anisum setellatum is apparently a much older name.

This page has a star anise product with some useful-looking information, and apparently it's an Australian product. Of particular interest is the "ingredients" section and the quantities to use in various applications. I don't know whether the ingredients listing is the active ingredients in star anise itself, or in the supplied product. Given it claims to be a pure extract, it could well be the former. Safrole is the "warming" part in peppery spices, for eg.

http://www.alibaba.com/product-tp/10772 ... tract.html

Botanical Source: Star Anise seed pods

Common names: Star Anise, Star Aniseed, Badiane, Chinese Star Anise, Anise Stars

Latin Name: Illicium verum
Belongs to Illiciaceae family. Native to China and Vietnam, Star Anise is today grown almost exclusively in southern China, Indo-China, and Japan.

Ingredients: shikimic acid, anethole, safrolene, 1, 4 cineol, foeniculin, methyl vhavicol, phellandrene, limonene, linalool, nerolidol, terpineol, cinnamyl acetate.

Properties: powerful and liquorice-like but more pungent and stronger than anise bouquet, warm, sweet, aromatic and evocative of a bitter aniseed flavour. Digesting and breath sweetener, carminative, stomachic, stimulant and diuretic.

Fields of application: Star Anise extract is used in food and beverage industries, in cosmetics, aromatherapy and pharmaceutical preparations. Useful in treating colds, flu, bronchitis, coughing, indigestion, cramping; a remedy for colic and rheumatism. Can be used in producing alcoholic beverages, confectionary, cookies, fruit compotes, jams, sweetmeats and poultry; to flavor tea; in the manufacture of cough syrups and sore throat medications, in Chinese cooking and traditional Chinese medicine; to flavour other medicines and to scent soaps and perfumes.

Star Anise CO2 extract recommended concentration in food, beverages, food supplements and natural remedies is 0.01 0.5%. Replacement rate of dry Star Anise with Star Anise CO2 extract is 1 kg with 15 g correspondingly. For convenient use, it is recommended to dilute the extract in any vegetable oil (sunflower, olive, grape seed, etc.) in ratio of 1:20 before use as a food additive.
Percent ratio to the total mass in skin care products is 0.001 0.1%. The use of Star Anise CO2 extract improves metabolic processes of skin, has calming, antiseptic, and moisturizing effect, improves skin elasticity, and helps retain skin softness and resilience.

Caution: Large doses can be poisonous. Avoid during pregnancy, lactation, in cases of liver disease, and with young children. Use Star Anise extract with caution, and dilute significantly before using on the skin. Very concentrated! Keep out of reach of children.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2009 11:44 am 
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Sydneyside wrote:
I'd be interested in some info on Cod Liver Oil and its uses. Particularly recomendations on quantity and frequency to use it.


Whilst reading an article on hemp seeds (actually a literature review of claims from Renaissance writers), I found some stats on cod liver oil. Unfortunately I'm unable to copy-and-paste from the secured PDF (I'll type it up separately), but it's on pages 6 and 7. http://www.aviculture-europe.nl/nummers/09E06A15.pdf. The authors claim that hemp seeds are a better source of vitamins A and C and omega fatty acids.

Food (hehe) for thought ...


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 17, 2009 11:46 am 
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:lol: Nice one, Info. :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 9:34 am 
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I've been searching for reputable information about Cleavers (bidens pilosa) for a while now. Julie you may be able to help with this - or anyone else.

Almost everything I've been able to find is about in vitro testing on extracts in lab conditions. There seems to be little or nothing done in a veterinary context - more the typical mice or lab rat type thing. I can't find anything convincing that would apply to real life in the chook pen. Even Veterinary Herbal Texts have almost nothing in them but vague references to traditional ethnoveterinary practices. No dosages. I think that no real research has been done. I've been scanning through Herbal Medicine texts, Medline, Pubmed, Google Scholar, Sciencedirect etc.

As far as questionable sources go - I have found a number of web testimonials - sellers of various powdered or otherwise packaged products. I mean things like this:
http://www.evitamins.com/healthnotes.asp?ContentID=2070002

or

http://www.viable-herbal.com/herbdesc1/1cleaver.htm

or

http://www.organic-herbal-tinctures.co.uk/cleavers-tincture.htm

I have no idea where this information comes from so I can't really put it in a post here or recommend the dosages. It seems to involve a fair amount of guessing and speculation accompanied by commercial interests. There's certainly plenty of websites trying to sell it.

I have no doubt that herbal fans are using Cleavers, but it may still be in the realms of the 'Old Wives Tales' or traditional use, rather than any scientifically supported use.

Feedback from anyone here would be good. Anyone got anything?

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 10:00 am 
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Question:

According to DPI, Cobbler's pegs is Bidens Pilosa

Galium aparine is commonly called Cleavers! Which one are we talking about? Australian sites seem to equate Bidens Pilosa with Cobblers' pegs or Cleavers. European sites seem to equate Galium aparine with those names.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galium_aparine

This treatment seems difficult to identify, difficult to quantify and difficult to research.


I'm beginning to agree with this quote. Underlining & bolding is mine:

Quote:
Cleavers (Galium aparine) is often included in herbal mixtures offered for the treatment of kidney and bladder problems, including bladder infections, kidney stones, and prostatitis. It is also said to help “cleanse” the lymph system. However, there has not been any meaningful scientific evaluation of the herb. Even animal and test-tube studies are essentially lacking.

A typical recommended dose of cleavers is one cup of tea three times daily, made by steeping 10–15 grams of the herb in a cup of hot water.

Cleavers has not undergone any meaningful safety testing. Safety in young children, pregnant or nursing women, or people with severe liver or kidney disease has not been established.

In case cleavers does in fact have diuretic effects as claimed, people taking the medication lithium should use cleavers only under the supervision of a physician, as dehydration can be dangerous with this medication.1

If you are taking lithium, do not use cleavers except under the supervision of a physician


(Health & Wellness information provided by the Bermuda Hospitals Board)
http://www.bermudahospitals.bm/health-w ... iid=104667

I can't find out enough about this one to do any more than take this advice. In the absence of any further reliable information, I can only apply this cautionary advice to both human and animal health.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 5:07 pm 
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I wish I could help you with cleavers cathy, to be honest they have baffled me for a while and I am yet to get a positive I'd on what I think moight be them here at our place.
I can only vouch for what I have used and found useful I am afraid. They do have horse uses though. Try veronica ferguson horse herbal.
Cheers julie

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 5:17 pm 
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after seeing the axe in this post it reminded me of a yarn my uncle used to tell all duck breeders so here we go(he wasnt big on judging squirters)
2 duck breeders discussing their stud drakes and a young bloke says i got the best stud of all
hes not fussy what breed of duck he does the lot after much arguing the 2 experts said what breed is this duck &$@&er the young feller said an AXE


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