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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 6:15 pm 
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:rofl: Not a duck lover I see.

I love my ducks, but I quite like roast duck as well Colin. I almost had it for Chrissy dinner this year, but the birds are still a tad small. Roast duck has to be postponed until the end of January.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 6:36 pm 
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I am very fond of roast duck as well and we had one just last week. A coles special - cost $20 but it was pretty small in reality.

It was cooked as per the recipe Duck a L'orange from Epicurious.com

But goodness there was next to no meat on it.

No wonder chinese resturants chop them into small cubes.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:27 pm 
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Just in case you missed it here is 2 and a half ducklings

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:31 pm 
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They look small, but tasty. :thumbs: Our muscovies dress up a bit bigger than that.

Oh ... and that would be herbs sprinkled on the top wouldn't it, Julie? :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:47 pm 
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roast duck is the best poultry eating there is i love my mussies golden brown best way to judge them to


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:09 pm 
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Actually its tiny bits of black truffle and sea salt. Will be off for couple of days heve a great christmas

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:13 pm 
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You too, Julie. Enjoy the break!

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm 
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dont know to much about the health properties for animals but i love fresh herbs for myself
let alone the fowls


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 12:25 pm 
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On Cathy's information above, I've done dual searches on both plant types - Bidens pilosa and Galium aparine. As she's already found, reputable information is scanty at best. Most articles are along these lines, using a lot of "MAY" and "POSSIBLY".



Constituents of Bidens pilosa L.: Do the components found so far explain the use of this plant in traditional medicine?

Peter Geissbergera and Urs Séquina

Institute for Organic Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Received 27 February 1990;
accepted 22 June 1990.
Available online 11 November 2002.

Abstract

The dried aerial parts of Bidens pilosa L. were extracted with petrol ether, chloroform, methanol, and methanol/water. The petrol ether and the methanol/water extracts showed some antimicrobial activity. Fractionation of the extracts yielded well known substances, most of which have, however, not yet been described as constituents of Bidens pilosa. Several of these substances have previously been shown to be biologically active. Thus, phenylheptatriyne, linolic acid and linolenic acid have antimicrobial activities. On the other hand, friedelin and friedelan-3β-ol, as well as several of the flavonoids found are anti-inflammatory agents. The detection of these compounds in extracts from B. pilosa may rationalize the use of this plant in traditional medicine in the treatment of wounds, against inflammations and against bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract.


This article actually tested its efficacy against peptic ulcers in rats and came up positive: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... cc270b04d9


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 1:33 pm 
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infoaddict wrote:
On Cathy's information above, I've done dual searches on both plant types - Bidens pilosa and Galium aparine. As she's already found, reputable information is scanty at best. Most articles are along these lines, using a lot of "MAY" and "POSSIBLY".



Constituents of Bidens pilosa L.: Do the components found so far explain the use of this plant in traditional medicine?

Peter Geissbergera and Urs Séquina

Institute for Organic Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Received 27 February 1990;
accepted 22 June 1990.
Available online 11 November 2002.

Abstract

The dried aerial parts of Bidens pilosa L. were extracted with petrol ether, chloroform, methanol, and methanol/water. The petrol ether and the methanol/water extracts showed some antimicrobial activity. Fractionation of the extracts yielded well known substances, most of which have, however, not yet been described as constituents of Bidens pilosa. Several of these substances have previously been shown to be biologically active. Thus, phenylheptatriyne, linolic acid and linolenic acid have antimicrobial activities. On the other hand, friedelin and friedelan-3β-ol, as well as several of the flavonoids found are anti-inflammatory agents. The detection of these compounds in extracts from B. pilosa may rationalize the use of this plant in traditional medicine in the treatment of wounds, against inflammations and against bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract.


This article actually tested its efficacy against peptic ulcers in rats and came up positive: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... cc270b04d9



I am always wary when these articles say antimicrobial activity. It implies activity along the lines of an antibiotic but in actual fact what they have done is flooded an agar plate with a bacterial mixture and then placed a paper disk dipped onto the substance being tested and looked for signs of inhibition of the bacterial growth near and around he disc. Its called a plate overlay technique. Many things will give that effect, including petrol, dettol, turpentine and a million other things. None of which I would be tipping down an animals throat. The details of exactly how the antimicrobial testing was done to claim invivo antimicrobial activity needs to be expanded. Just a note of caution.

Mike

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 2:36 pm 
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Chicken07 wrote:
They look small, but tasty. :thumbs: Our muscovies dress up a bit bigger than that.

Oh ... and that would be herbs sprinkled on the top wouldn't it, Julie? :wink:

They were just the breast fillets cathy!

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 5:55 pm 
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Thanks for having a look Info. It's good to know it wasn't just me that couldn't find much. I've come to the conclusion that, despite the odd mention here & there, there just isn't the solid and consistent results that would make me confident to advise people to use it for anything. I found a few early anti-malarial studies, the ulcer study and a few others, but no results were backed up with repeated studies and none of it appeared to be relevant for poultry. I decided to give this one a miss and move onto the next item on the list.

Good to know they were breasts New Feathers. :rofl: I thought they were a bit small.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 6:15 pm 
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Chicken07 wrote:
Thanks for having a look Info. It's good to know it wasn't just me that couldn't find much. I've come to the conclusion that, despite the odd mention here & there, there just isn't the solid and consistent results that would make me confident to advise people to use it for anything. I found a few early anti-malarial studies, the ulcer study and a few others, but no results were backed up with repeated studies and none of it appeared to be relevant for poultry. I decided to give this one a miss and move onto the next item on the list.

Good to know they were breasts New Feathers. :rofl: I thought they were a bit small.


Huh - how did Regina's name get into this ???

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 7:35 pm 
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You are very bad, Mike. :lol: I don't know how Regina puts up with you!

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 10:02 pm 
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Oh dear! And that's the biggest roasting pan I own. Yes they were a bit shrunken,
admittedly they filled the dish quite well when cold :rofl: :bolt:

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