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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2009 9:41 pm 
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Aloe Vera - Aloe barbadensis
Also: Aloe ferox & Aloe perryi

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Parts Used:
Aloe vera gel is the viscous, colourless, transparent liquid from the inside of the leaf, and is used topically.
The juice is also used internally as a laxative.

Constituents:
Aloe vera gel consists primarily of water, polsaccharides, amino acids, lipids, sterols and enzymes.

Traditional Uses:

* Gel used for external treatment of wounds, burns and skin inflammation. Clinical studies indicate that the gel promotes and accelerates wound healing by directly stimulating macrophage and fibroblast activity (Davis, 1994). The gel also hydrates, insulates and protects. It also has an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect because of a salicylate-like substance. Can be used following surgery to aid wound healing. Has been used traditionally for for allergies, eczema, abscesses, fungal infections and dermititis.

* Acemannan is the major carbohydrate fraction of the gel. Its therapeutic properties include acceleration of wound healing, inhibition of inflammation, and antiviral effects. It has also been shown to have antitumour activity. Acemannan has been shown to be an effective adjuvant in the vaccination of chickens against some avian viral diseases.

* Aloe is used as an ingredient in aquarium water conditioners.

* Used in the Middle East and Egypt as early as 1500 BC as a topical treatment for various conditions and as a cathartic (laxative). The juice (not the gel) is given as a laxative and the effect of aloe is generally not observed before 6 hours after oral administration, and sometimes not until 24 hours or longer after administration.

Preparation Notes:
Fresh aloe vera gel is recommended for external use. Harvest leaves, and wash them with water. Remove the outer layers of the leaf, including the pericyclic cells, leaving a 'fillet' of gel. Care should be taken not to tear the green rind, which can contaminate the gel with leaf exudates. Some herbalists simply cut a leaf and send it home with the owner to make fresh cuts daily. The yellow gel in the pericyclic tubules is dried into a red black mass and is used internally as a laxative.

Dosage for Small Animals:
External Use:
Fresh gel: may be applied topically as directed; when taken directly from a plant, the leaf should be cut lengthwise and the gel scraped out and applied.
Internal Use:
Juice from leaf: 0.5-1.5mL per kg, divided daily
Acemannan: 15-30 mg/kg, divided daily
Tincture: 1:2-1:3:0.5 mL per 10kg, divided daily (optimally TID [3 times a day]) and diluted or combined with other herbs

Clinical Actions:
Demulcent (forms a soothing film), vulnerary (used in healing or treating wounds), stimulant laxative.

Toxicity Information:
A few reports of contact dermatitis and burning skin sensations have been documented following topical application of aloe vera gel to dermabraded skin in humans. Dried aloe is a cathartic (laxative). Milks (1949) claimed that large doses "congest the pelvic viscera, irritate the rectum, and may cause abortion." The Botanical Safety Handbook lists that as little as 1g given daily for several days has been reported to cause colon perforation, bleeding diarrhea, and kidney damage.

Contraindications:
Aloe-containing products for constipation should be used only when no effect can be attained through diet change or the use of bulk-forming products. Stimulant laxatives should not be used when abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting is present, or in patients with intestinal obstruction or stenosis, atony, dehydration, or chronic constipation; nor should it be used for inflammatory intestinal disease (unlike the gel). It is also contraindicated in patients with cramps, colic, hemorrhoids, nephritis, or undiagnosed abdominal symptoms. Long-term use may cause dependence, electrolyte disturbances, and atonic colon.

Drug Interactions:
Decreased intestinal transit time with aloe juice may reduce absorption of orally administered drugs.

Source: Wynn, S.G. & Fougere, B.J. (2007) Veterinary Herbal Medicine. Mosby Elsevier. Sydney

Disclaimer
All threads listed in this Index are the opinions of caring forum users. Backyard Poultry takes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained within, and if in doubt, always refer your poultry queries and problems to your vet.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 12:21 am 
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good info cathy, you are spot on about the acemannan being used as a vaccine adjuvent, i once read a patent application for its use with mareks vaccine.
Cheers julie

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 12:30 am 
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Yes, that's interesting isn't it. I didn't realise that until today.

I also came across an interesting study where aloe vera had positive therapeutic effects on frostbitten ears of New Zealand white rabbits. Topical aloe vera gel improved tissue survival by 20%, cream by 24% and a combination of the two by 30%. Another study showed a 62.5% reduction in wound diameter in mice that received oral aloe at 10mg/kg/day - and a 50.8% reduction was recorded in animals that were given topical 25% aloe. It seems that the aloe vera stimulates and promotes early healing, although later the controls did catch up a bit.

It wasn't about chickens, but I did wonder if aloe vera would be something we should try for small comb injuries, although I have to admit to being a Betadine fan. :wink:

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 7:57 am 
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Chicken07 wrote:
Yes, that's interesting isn't it. I didn't realise that until today.

I also came across an interesting study where aloe vera had positive therapeutic effects on frostbitten ears of New Zealand white rabbits. Topical aloe vera gel improved tissue survival by 20%, cream by 24% and a combination of the two by 30%. Another study showed a 62.5% reduction in wound diameter in mice that received oral aloe at 10mg/kg/day - and a 50.8% reduction was recorded in animals that were given topical 25% aloe. It seems that the aloe vera stimulates and promotes early healing, although later the controls did catch up a bit.

It wasn't about chickens, but I did wonder if aloe vera would be something we should try for small comb injuries, although I have to admit to being a Betadine fan. :wink:


Hi, one of my rosters had black spots on his comb and he was getting more and more, a friend told me to put Aloe Vera on them and after a few times they just to peel off, some times I just scraped them a little and off they came after treatment with the Aloe Vera.
Ronben


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:12 am 
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That's interesting. Thanks for the feedback Ron.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:38 am 
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Chicken07 wrote:
That's interesting. Thanks for the feedback Ron.

The Aloe Vera I used was from Thursday Plantation (97.4% pure Aloe Vera Gel) I just put a bit on my finger and dab it on the infected black spots. I put it on each day for a week on so.
Ron


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:30 pm 
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I use aloe on sunburn , just break of a leaf and rub it on ...if u pop it in the fridge for a while first it is even cooling as well as soothing.....was thinking of trialing it if ( more likely when) I get an outbreak of fowlpox this summer....maybe I should do a proper trial, betadine vs aloe vs a control group with no treatment....cheers pam

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 7:15 pm 
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Sounds like a good idea Pam. We'll just have to wait for the clouds of mozzies to arrive. It won't be too long with this weather here.

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