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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:23 am 
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Showy Hen
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Location: Port MacDonnell SA
I found one of my hens today with her insides hanging out and bleeding from where she lays eggs she was in agony as the flies were all over it, she was trying to peck at it, I thought it would be more kind to put her out of her missery as this was a bit difficult to deal with. It was the most awful experence I have every had. So if I get in this situation would someone tell me what to do to have a clean quick death for these poor animals. ( please don't say chop the head off I can't do that)



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:31 am 
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Hi Merilyn. It is very distressing and it's good to give it some thought in advance. Here are some links that may be of interest:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7963200&hilit=exhaust+authorities

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=8714&hilit=+exhaust+kill

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7983293&hilit=tomahawk

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7977808&hilit=table+edge+chick

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:23 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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I think the quickest easiest way for a lady to do it would probably neck dislocation with a broom handle.

Hold the chook by the feet upside down until it calms down (quite a sudden change once the blood goes to their head, the seem to give up fighting pretty easy) lower it to the ground so that its neck is on the ground, lay a broom handle over its neck. Quickly step on it with both feet and pull up with the legs. You should hear a crack.

There will be no blood, no pain, and an instant death.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:53 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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I am a small woman, 5'2 and 50kg and I have no trouble with neck dislocation, but unfortunately I have experience with many culls so it is easy physically for me, I can't give instructions in writing though it is something you need to see done.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:57 pm 
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Champion Bird
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I had to kill a magpie after a really bad storm here in Brisbane a while back. It was really badly injured, still breathing (i know cos i could see its lungs :shock: ). I've never killed anything, and couldnt drive anywhere to a vet, so I grabbed my tomahawk, lay the bird on the grass, and just chopped its head off. I probably used 3 times as much force as necessary but i didn't want to risk it not working. That really would have freaked me.

I always thought I'd freak out if i had to do anything like that, but I was so relieved it wasnt in pain any more, the only thing i felt was relief, and the poor bird was dead instantly.

I wouldnt hesitate to do that to your hen in your situation. You don't need to be very strong. You just have to end her pain immediately, if not sooner. What an awful situation for you. I understand how you feel :grouphug:

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:00 pm 
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As a moderator I need to add that whats effective and what recommended by animal welfare groups can be quite different.

Animal welfare groups do peruse this and other similar forums and we have no wish to attract unwanted attention by publishing a graphic description or badly worded descriptions of euthanasia that does not meet animal welfare approved methods.

BYP is seen world wide and by people who are not members of BYP. Please bear this in mind.

This is a general informtion post and NOT directed at anyone person

Mike

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:18 pm 
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Champion Bird
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I understand that Mike. I'm a volunteer with wildlife rspca in brisbane. I talked to them about what i had done, and if i'd done anything cruel or illegal. They said if an animal is in that sort of dire situation, especially when i was unable to take it to a vet (this was after the big storms that hit brisbane in november '08 and roads were blocked everywhere in my area) anything humane to end its suffering is ok, obviously 'humane' being the operative word. They had no problem with my actions.

I appreciate BYPs situation though, and I'm sorry if I've caused any problems. :oops: :cry:

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:24 pm 
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Casscat, I went through the same storm here, and my pens were a pile or twisted metal and rubble. Some of them landed on top of birds and injured them horribly. When the situation arises you just do what you need to do even if you never thought you could. The most important thing is to stop the animal from suffering. It's good to know that the RSPCA in Brisbane have a sensible and practical view of things.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 2:01 pm 
It's often the more apparently violent method that gives the animal the least pain. The axe or a sharp knife is also tool most likely to be at hand in an average household.
If you can't do it yourself, then you need a neighbour that can do the job quickly. Nice to take it to the vet and have it put to sleep but that can take hours of waiting, and a stressful car trip. I hope the bird mentioned above didn't have to wait long for a decision to be made in it's behalf.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 3:26 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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I'm not speaking from experience here as I've only euthanased my chooks by injection ( not always stress-free in the wrong hands).

When I was a vet student in my early years at school we had to do farm work experiance. The first farm I went to was a high country sheep station in NZ owned by old friends of the family. On my first day I was told that I was going to have to do everything from killing to shearing, drenching etc. I was quite happy to do so, or so I thought. First thing in the morning we went to a yard where there were some older ewes to be slaughtered for the working dog's food. I was demonstrated how it was done ( getting the sheep down, twisting and severing its spinal cord while at the same time slicing its neck through to the atrteries). Sorry about the graphic description :oops:
After the first one was done, the knife was given to me and I grabbed the next ewe. I just couldn't do it. Not because I didn't want to kill her, but I was scared I wouldn't be confident or strong enough to quickly snap her neck and I'd cause suffering. Of course I wasn't made to do it, it was just bluff and a bit of a test.

Now when it comes to dislocating necks of chooks, I think the same principle applies - it must be a firm, confident, short sharp movement. If you are at all tentative you are not going to be effective and you are likely to cause suffering.This is where I feel I am at. I know how to do it in theory but am just not confident enough to.
Neck dislocation performed competently IS humane. So is decapitation ( by axe, machete or whatever) and so is cutting the carotid arteries according to the CSIRO model code of welfare for slaughter of livestock.
No other means are mentioned in this code as being acceptable. The code of course, addresses stunning as well, but that is not feasible for us backyarders.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 8:38 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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we've always grown out own meat where we could im my family - and most certainly always had animals, be it dogs, cats, chooks, rabbits,pigs,, sheep, goats, horses, parrots, cattle... i even had a pet crow for a while when i was in my teens (rescued an orphan)

i've worked for vets and done the first two years of the VT course out at UQ Gatton (had to defer due to the financial strain of paying a mortgage, needed full time work)

there's no easy way to dispatch a creature, as an animal lover i am most concerned for the welfare of the critter, and making sure there is no suffering.

if an animal is ill - it can be the hardest decision. my first great dane - Quintessa Dunderi Bunya (who's prenom i use as my tag, in her memory) was striken with bloat, when some silly people gave her whole cooked chicken carcases, thinking they were being nice.
alot of large dog breeds are prone to this condition - and there is a very expensive surgery to 'untwist' the stomach and try to save the animal... with only a 50% chance of survival, and a high chance of repetition, i chose to have my most beloved Bunya put down, after hours in the vet surgery, trying to save her. it nearly killed me, but i couldn't watch her suffer, and continue to suffer, when she loved and trusted me. I had the vet give her valabarb, and held her head in my lap while she drifted away to the rainbow bridge.

even having grown up with it, and done it myself plenty of times, i still hesitate when i euthanise an animal - be it a chook for meat, or the poor lorikeet we had hit the loungeroom window at kamakaze speed the other week - snapping its beak in an immensley painful and irreperable way. i'm a realist, and i know that i am granting a quick exit, and i have an appreciation for the soul of the creature.

if you're in doubt, ask a friend or neighbour for help. and even if you hesitate, remember that sometimes death is a mercy, a kindness.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:30 pm 
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Champion Bird
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I know this post is aimed at helping women deal with injured/ill chickens that are beyond help, but I suspect there are many men out there who also struggle with how best to deal with such situations.

Onya guys. This isn't a gender specific problem. We all want the same outcome.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 7:38 am 
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I was thinking of methods for both, but I think there are times when some women have difficulties that some men don't. For instance, my hands are not as strong as my OH's. He can dislocate a neck very swiftly without having any difficulty even with a bigger bird. Perhaps it's not a matter of gender, but just a matter of size and strength. My hands are half his size and probably half as strong. I liked Tasmaniac's suggestions for that reason. It's also why I tend to use the hatchet rather than my bare hands if the chick is a bit older. It's possible there are men out there that have the same difficulties.

I have the same trouble with the tap. If he's turned it off - I can't turn it on - it's very frustrating. As he gets sick of me whinging about it, he's now fitted hose nozzles with those handles that you squeeze in to turn it on, and just release to turn off. These are good for weak hands and limits the amount of complaining he has to listen to. :lol:

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 7:53 am 
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No - its certainly not a gender specific thing.

I have relatively small hands also but i do have the strength to dislocate a chooks neck even on a bigger bird.

But...... I simply dont like killing anything. Well there are exceptions :oops: We have had a small mouse plaque here and in the house. Where there is mice there is also going to be brown snakes. So we have been trapping the mice in one of those wire cage traps. Early on I figured out that when you toss a live mouse into a chook pen - more times than not the mouse gets away.

So - all the trapped mice get a swimming lesson - they all fail the lesson exam so the chooks get nice but still treats.

Mike

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 8:37 am 
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Proud Rooster
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chookyinoz wrote:
they all fail the lesson exam so the chooks get nice but still treats.

Thats a nice way of putting it... HAHA!

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