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 Post subject: Wing wounds
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 2:52 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:58 am
Posts: 4234
Location: Plainland, SEQ
WING WOUNDS

If you come across your chicken or rooster with a wing that looks like it has been broken or damaged in some way, the best remedy is:-

Separate the injured animal straight away, or the other chickens will peck at it, this could do more damage to the injured animal

It might be a good idea to give your chicken some vitamins, it will be going through some shock and the vitamin input might help to perk it up a bit
You can buy some powdered vitamins that you just add to the drinking water

It might be a good idea to give it to the whole flock, especially if the injury was due to a dog attack, they may all be suffering from shock

Examine the good wing, and check out where all the bones are and how they work, then gently examine the other wing to make sure that there is actually something out of place
Sometimes when wings are traumatized they just don’t work all that well afterwards, if something has obviously snapped, carefully fold the wing back in place (as it would be in a resting position), you can apply a splint but it is not really necessary if you apply a bandage to hold the wing in position

Before applying the bandage, it might be a good idea to check him all over to see if any other damage has occurred, if a dog attack it may have puncture wounds that need to be treated, clean the wounds with peroxide and apply antibiotic ointment

And then with some gauze bandage or a stretch bandage, strap the wing to the body, you might have to play around with this until you find the right position, keep on persevering, it will work
After three days remove the bandage, if it is a damaged tendon, or a torn ligament, your bird should be able to hold it up, well at least a little bit anyway

If you see no improvement, then replace the bandage for a further four days
This is all the time necessary to heal damaged tendons or ligaments injuries
But – isn’t there always a but, if you believe that the wing is actually broken, do not remove the bandage on the third day, leave it on for ten days, only do this if you are absolutely sure that it is a break not a tissue injury


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Broken or injured Wing

Wing fractures are less common than those of the legs. In the wild state, a fractured wing usually results in the bird's death from starvation if it lives long enough to escape the attention of a predator.

Wing fractures most frequently affect the humerus, ulna and radius, and here they produce the greatest deformity and loss of function of the wing

Humerus.. is the long bone from the body to the first joint of the wing
Ulna.. this is found in the second section of the wing.. middle section.. it is the larger of the two bones and faces the rear of the bird
Radius… this is also found in the second section of the wing.. middle section.. it is the smaller of the two bones and faces the front of the bird
Elbow … Is the joint between these two sets of bones

Although the wrist bones and those beyond bear the bulk of the flight feathers, limited flying is often still possible even if these bones are quite badly damaged. A fractured wing is usually held low, most noticeably at its tip

Severe fractures to the humerus with angulation at the site of damage sometimes allow the carpal region to drop, but the wing tip to be raised. In all cases of wing fractures, however, diagnosis is relatively simple due to the unusual mobility of the wing, its limpness, an unusual crossing of the wing tips, and any of the other signs already mentioned with fractures of the leg. A word of warning is necessary because certain tumors of bone origin can cause weakness of the shafts of the long bones, cause proliferation of abnormal bone and show signs similar to those of fractures.

The main difference is that the swelling is larger than that associated with a simple fracture, the skin shows no sign of damage, and mobility at the level of the swelling may not be accompanied by pain. Sometimes nutritional diseases such as osteomalacia result in fractures of limb bones; in such cases the overlying skin may not show signs of damage

The setting of wing fractures is particularly difficult because the position of the wing at rest is in a bent or flexed position. Pulling on the end of the wing in the case of overlapping or twisted fragments, therefore, separates rather than replaces the fractured bones. Even when they can be repositioned correctly, external splintings give little real support. The best that can usually be achieved is to bring the fractured ends as nearly as possible into contact and be content with a reasonable alignment of the bones with the wing in the flexed position. This should be done under general anesthesia.

The tips of each wing, and preferably also the roots of the tail quills, are then fixed to each other with adhesive tape. A second circle of sticky tape around the front of the breast and encircling the shoulder joints prevents movement of the wings, dislodging the fracture and wing tip anchorage. According to the size and strength of the bird, a third circle of tape may be advisable between the first and second, its width depending also on the size of the patient. The third circle of tape must not be tight or it will restrict breathing. The dressings should be carefully removed after 7 to 28 days, depending upon the circumstances and activity of the bird.

Fractures of the wings of small birds cannot be set for several reasons: first, human fingers are too large and clumsy to work with such small bones with any chance of success; second, the resentment of these little creatures against any form of restraint is so great that it is usually impossible to even make an examination of a broken wing without the struggles of the bird aggravating the injury; third, there is no way of affixing a splint or cast to the wing of a small bird without doing more harm than good.

The best course to follow is to place the bird in a cage from which the high perches have been removed and observe the droop of the injured member.

If the wing hangs in a graceful droop, as it would if the bird drooped it intentionally, place food and water within easy reach of the little bird and go on about your business; feed and water at night for the next ten days, so that the bird will not at any time be disturbed or frightened into attempting to use the injured wing.
At the end of that period the injury will be healed, . and there is a good chance that the bird will not be crippled.


If the wing hangs at an awkward, abnormal angle, it must be folded against the bird's side in as natural a position as possible, and then held in place by passing a narrow strip of adhesive tape twice around the body in such a manner as to leave other wing free. Some breeders have reported good results from fastening the ends of the two wings together with string or a letter clip. This might work all right with larger, heavier birds, but I have found that the small flying birds will fight this form of restraint until the injured wing is damaged beyond repair. In practically all cases where restraint is necessary the bird will be crippled; often, however, they will be able to fly good enough to take care of themselves. I have known some of these broken-winged birds to make wonderful breeders.

We have not tried it, but some have had success by just taping the wing to the birds side for 2 to 3 weeks. (sample picture below) Run the tape over the wing keeping it to the birds side and go under the other wing so it can still move it. The only problem is you may not know if the wing is in the correct position or not to heal and the bird may try and chew the tape off.




Particularly difficult fractures to treat are those involving the joints. Sometimes it may not be possible to determine without an x-ray examination if the fracture is associated with dislocation. In skilled hands, however, a simple dislocation can sometimes be corrected by slipping the bone back into position under general anesthesia.

The Healing process:

The bones of small, passerine birds tend to heal more quickly than those of the larger species where the muscles exert more tension. If the two ends of the broken bone are brought closely together and kept in place, healing is usually rapid.

If a gap is left or if there is an overlap, or if muscle lies between the fragments, healing is very slow or may not occur, especially where movement of the bones is possible.

When the blood vessels are badly bruised or severed, not only may no bone be formed but it may actually be absorbed; the limb beyond the injury may also die. This is known as necrosis or death of tissue: infection hastens necrosis and if bacteria enter, gangrene may follow.

Fractures where the overlying skin is ruptured are known as "compound". Where the skin is intact the fractures are referred to as "simple", whether the bone is merely cracked in two or a dozen pieces. In the latter case, however, it is also called "comminuted". Several other types of fracture occur in the simple and compound groups.

Treatment:
It is noted here that some breeders have found that splints have been picked off causing more pain and have caused the bird to stop eating and perish.

Some prefer just to keep the bird quiet as possible and allow any broken limbs to knit themselves.

It may not heal in the proper position but this is preferable to causing additional distress

As with any serious wound, bathing with a 5 per cent sterile solution of common salt in water cleanses the tissues and helps to remove infection where the skin is broken.

Antibiotics or sulphonamides should be given in these cases by mouth or by injection under the skin or into the thigh or breast muscle.

The simplest and often the most effective treatment of the actual fracture is to do nothing.

The bird should be separated from its companions to prevent persecution and cannibalism and protection from its own frantic fluttering.

A smooth-walled box with perches at floor level is best for wing and leg fractures.

Wire netting should not be used except as a lid, because this material encourages attempts to climb.

Some success has been reported using internal stainless metal pins in fractures of the humerus, ulna and radius, femur, tibio-tarsus and even tarso-metatarsus, but this type of surgery is the province of the specialist veterinarian, and the methods are usually applicable only to larger birds.

For fractures involving the elbow, carpus and hock, compression plates of molded aluminum or plastic have been found very effective in immobilizing these vulnerable areas.

They should be made specially for the purpose, suitably padded and held in place by thread through holes in the edges.

Cause:
Crash landing onto the ground
Panic attacks and flight can often produce factures of the clavicle or wishbone, and air sacs may torn in the process

Prevention:
Wire bottoms on coops can cause damage to legs and feet – it may be wise to look for an alternative bedding material on the coop floor

Remove any high perches and just leave the lower ones in. The bird may soon perch and a leg may heal in a more natural position.

To release a bird just after nursing it through the healing period of a fractured wing is about as kind as letting a lame fox free in front of a pack of foxhounds!


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Muscle and Tendon Placement on the wings

Image
Simply click on the picture to increase the size


How Wings Work

Image
Simply click on the picture to increase the size

source:
-http://fowlfacts.proboards.com-

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 Post subject: Re: Wing wounds
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 11:06 am 
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Showy Hen
Showy Hen

Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:28 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Central Coast, NSW
This is some great info, thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Wing wounds
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 11:19 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
Wise Wyandotte

Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:58 am
Posts: 4234
Location: Plainland, SEQ
Thank you but it's not my own work, I'm only reinstalling contents from a broken link and tidying it up a bit.

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 Post subject: Re: Wing wounds
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 12:14 pm 
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Assist Admin
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:11 am
Posts: 21523
Location: Gold Coast, QLD, AUSTRALIA
Great work! There are some relevant photos in the Gallery, that would also have links to threads wherever I could find them. :-)


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 Post subject: Re: Wing wounds
PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 10:39 am 
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Showy Hen
Showy Hen

Joined: Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:37 pm
Posts: 119
Thanks for this!
Information that is needed here today.

Sent from my GT-I9197 using Tapatalk


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