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PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2016 10:47 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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have a read linky-link

I don't believe colour has any significance to the amount of calcium and the general 'hardness' of the shell.

Something to consider is how much calcium for the shell is being obtained from bone deposites as opposed to dietary source.

One thing I keep saying is that I prefer to feed any scratch mix (and any treats) in the morning as the girls require a high calcium feed at night. Please read the link for reference - it's important, stop feeding scratch at night if you are doing it.

If they don't get high calcium feed at night then the majority of the calcium for the eggshell will come from bone deposites and once that's all used up then probably a forced moult would be required to reset (if possible)

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I observe in fascination a worm move by peristaltic action through the freshly turned earth as I plant out my chilies. Grasping the Annelid I toss it to the waiting pack of beady-eyed vultures and watch the ensuing mayhem while laughing like a chook!


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 9:32 pm 
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Gallant Game
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Maybe try adding calcium sup. to the drinking water like I did.
It can't hurt and it might help....as I said it helped one of my hens and she is back to laying normally now.
Of course there can be many reasons for the laying of soft shelled eggs so not all hens will respond to calcium.

I read that lack of copper in the diet can be the cause of some soft shelled egg problems so I bought Sustenhance Perfect Poultry.
Haven't needed to give it to them so far.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 11:24 pm 
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Prime Pekin
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Milo wrote:
have a read linky-link

I don't believe colour has any significance to the amount of calcium and the general 'hardness' of the shell.



Yes but...even the link you provide states " Strain: Some strains of the birds may be able to deposit calcium for the egg shell at a faster rate than others, resulting in better deposition. It is observed that darker brown eggs have a higher shell quality than lighter brown eggs"

and as the shell colour relates to the breed of bird, that MAY be a consideration when looking at laying quirks and propensities eg I have always found my Polish (white eggs) are more inclined to soft shell eggs than my other (brown egg laying) breeds. However that is as far as the analysis has progressed ...


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 12:51 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/ ... l-quality/

quote
"Soft and Weak Shelled Eggs:Soft and weak shelled eggs can be common in older birds, especially those which are nearing the end of the laying period, having produced a high output of eggs. Whenever they are seen in younger flocks, they can be associated with coated or rough shells. If an egg is retained in the shell gland for too long, the next ovulation takes place at the usual time but before the previous egg is laid. The second egg may spend less time than normal in the shell gland and the result is a soft or shell-less egg. In such cases, a hen may not lay an egg on one day, but may lay both a coated and a soft-shelled egg on the next.


Rough Shelled Eggs: In some cases, two eggs may be in the shell gland at the same time which can cause a form of rough shelled egg often referred to as a ‘target’ or ‘thumb-print’ type. This problem can also result in ‘slab-sided’ eggs. There are other types of rough shelled eggs, including those with pimples or a sandpaper-type texture.


Coated Shells: Additional calcium may be deposited onto some eggs causing calcium splashing or a pink coloured egg. Typically these faults are caused by the egg remaining in the shell gland for an extended period. Often young flocks just coming into production are very susceptible to this defect. Any stresses or disturbances at the time when the egg is due to be laid will encourage the bird to retain the egg.


As a general point, it should be noted that a single stress or disturbance to a flock of laying hens can be enough to desynchronize the processes of egg formation for several days. This can cause a prolonged effect upon egg quality and during this time, a number of different egg quality faults may be seen."


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 12:58 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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And another interesting study

SHELL QUALITY AND COLOR VARIATION
IN BROILER BREEDER EGGS

http://japr.oxfordjournals.org/content/8/1/70.full.pdf

http://www.academicjournals.org/journal ... C81E179511


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 6:41 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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I haven't read sue's links to articles yet.

TookTook - I agree with you in the discussion regards to strain of bird. But this could equally apply to a white shelled breed.

I'm just saying that the brown pigment has nothing to do with the addition of calcium as the calcium comes first.

Yes darker brown eggs may be stronger than lighter brown eggs but this may be due to a multitude of factors, environmental or biolgical etc and care should be taken that a study in a closed flock of brown egg type layers should not be misrepresented as 'brown eggs are stronger than white eggs'

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Cheers, Milo.
I observe in fascination a worm move by peristaltic action through the freshly turned earth as I plant out my chilies. Grasping the Annelid I toss it to the waiting pack of beady-eyed vultures and watch the ensuing mayhem while laughing like a chook!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 3:13 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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The common factor seems to be that the longer an egg stays in the reproductive tract, the more calcium is laid down. The darker the egg the more time it spends in the reproductive tract being pigmented.
Is there an overlap here or do the two processes happen completely independently? I suspect not, as brown shells often have a calcium bloom or calcium spots.

The time of day for calcium ingestion is interesting. One study (can't find it now) suggests that late afternoon is the optimal time for calcium ingestion so that calcium for egg shell is drawn from the gut rather than from bone.


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