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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:10 am 
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Hatchling
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We have a problem with one of our chooks. Her tail feathers have gone, the skin around the cloaka is very red and her cloaka seems to be protruding. Droppings stick to her rear. She is not terribly active but still manages to lay. I have been washing her rear section and applying anti fungi cream.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 3:50 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:15 pm
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Location: ACT area
Sounds like a prolapse. If so anti fungal won't help. Can you please post a pic.

Click on this link for some pictures in the gallery
http://gallery.backyardpoultry.com/sear ... chid=72225


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 5:04 pm 
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Hatchling
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sue. from your pics it is a prolapsed plus a vent problem. Can you pls advise what the next step is. regards and thanks ian


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:26 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Go to the chemist and explain to the Pharmacist that you need some Haemorrhoid Ointment for a chook :rofl: I use Proctosedyl - you need one which is ant inflamatory not just anti itch.
Give your hen a wash around her vent and apply some ointment to the protruding bits (prolapse) and then try to push it back where it belongs. Then apply the ointment around the external bits. Hopefully things will tighten up. You will need to repeat this a couple of times a day until you either succeed or decide that it is not going to work - then euthanasia is the kindest option.
The other part of the treatment is to stop her laying by inducing a moult.
There is no guarantee that this treatment will be successful, especially if she is an older commercial hybrid
.
This is something I wrote up recently.

OK This will be long winded but please read on. :read
Like all animals hens start life with a set number of potential eggs. When the hen is mature enough she begins to lay. The onset of lay varies between birds and breeds. The laying cycle is dependant on length of available light. (about 13 hours min). This may include street or outside lighting, or extended lighting in commercial set ups.. Light causes the pituitary gland to trigger an hormonal response - eggs.. In some commercial breeds, this natural response has been 'engineered' to 'malfunction', enabling an extremely high initial egg out put. Egg laying is a high energy, high protein, high calcium process and can put enormous strain on a hen's body - especially if they are fed a sub optimum diet such as Scratch and Scraps. Hens which lay hard and fast are likely to enter 'Henopause' after their 2nd laying season. Do they suffer from hot flushes and mood swings? - don't know. They do tend to develop geriatric reproductive disorders. The most common - prolapse, large, small or misshapen eggs, soft shelled eggs, retained eggs and infections (Peritonitis and lash eggs). This is where Inducing a Moult --- may --- help.
A moult can be triggered by several things - reduced lighting --- sudden change of diet --- stress. It may be used by show breeders to bring birds into peak condition for the show season. It is also used to give a hen's body a chance to rest and recoup from the demands of laying and to allow them to replenish body reserves of calcium.

How Do You Do It?
1:- Isolate your hen.
2:- Reduce available light - dim to dark with a couple of light breaks for feeding.
3:- Change the diet. For a bird generally fed a quality laying pellet a reduction to grain only should be sufficient. Boiled rice or oatmeal is a good option. They may not eat much - don't worry, they are not doing much. 4:- Wait for egg production to fully cease (could take a while in a well nourished bird) then keep them light deprived for another week but offer good quality (high protein layer or breeder feed) and access to shell grit. They will soon commence a moult and shouldn't lay until they have refurbished internally and externally.

Good luck and keep us informed


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:36 pm 
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Hatchling
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thanks. your advice is much appreciated.


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