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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 6:36 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 5:27 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Mundoolun - Gold Coast Hinterlands Qld
The following breed profile can be downloaded at original high resolution: Click here to download Campine Presentation by Ross Summerell at FCAQ 2013 - 6.6MB PDF
Smaller file option: Click here to download Campine Presentation by Ross Summerell at FCAQ 2013 - 2.43MB PDF


The Charm of the Campine

by Ross Summerell
Presented at “Breeding the Breeds” for
Feather Clubs Association of Queensland Inc.
Rosewood Showgrounds, Sunday, 3rd March 2013

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The Charm of the Campine

“It is pronounced KAM-PEEN. The word CAMPINE is French (Flemish) and the method of pronouncing it is above.
We in English are accustomed to the word pine for the kind of a tree and at first 80 per cent of the people pronounced it as
if it were KAM-PINE, but really the INE is pronounced as EEN in queen ....”
--. by Rev. E. Lewis Jones, Hayope Rectory, Knighton, Radnorshire, England (as quoted to M. R. Jacobus, Ridgefield NJ, USA)


Although I am probably more well known for exhibiting my Australorps and Langshans, one of my favourite breeds of fowl is actually the Campine. Many Australians make the mistake of pronouncing the name of this fascinating bird as Cam pine, as it seems to be written, however the “pine” is actually pronounced “peen”, so the correct pronunciation of the bird is “Kampeen”.

The Campine fowl is centuries old and from my research we have found that the Phoenicians possibly brought the fowls with them to old Belgium, known as Belgae in ancient times. These fowls travelled from Belgium to Britain probably courtesy of the Gauls and more than likely by the Walloons and the Huguenots in the 16th to 18th centuries. Similar fowls were around in the Roman era and were reportedly looted, with other varieties, back to Rome from Belgium and neighbouring regions by Julius Caesar and his infamous ornithologists.

Later they were made up from the Braekel, and were imported from Belgium to England by the Rev. E. Lewis Jones in the 1890’s. The majority of the good quality show fowls that we know as the Campine here in Australia today are the descendants of the fowls imported from Rev. Jones’s breeding program.

It is interesting to read that famed poultry historian Edward Brown saw both rose and single combed fowls of Campine style and character on his visits to Belgium in the last fifteen years of the nineteenth century. Brown claims that, from the evidence available, both Campines and Braekels were descended from the same basic stock, arising from the old Friesland Fowl.

The Braekel originated from the wooded parts of Belgium whereas the Campine came from the dry sandy plains north of Brussels and east of Antwerp, called “La Campine”, hence the name of the fowl. The amount of available natural food was restricted in La Campine, hence the smaller size. Brown also says that unfortunately fanciers in Britain made changes "to the colouration of the plumage" and to the size of the body and in many cases Braekels were purchased and disseminated as Campines whilst he assumes that the Pencilled Hamburg was introduced.

Quoted from Edward Brown’s book, “As a fact the English Campine is more like a Braekel than the original, although the laying quality has been fully maintained. Belgian breeders have resented these changes. Concentration upon merely fancy points has hindered that wider adoption which was anticipated."

I have admired and bred Campines for many years, and my affection for the bird started back in the 1950’s as my late father kept them. I remember my mother’s insistence that she only used “those beautiful white eggs” for her home baked goodies. My mother was, in dad’s words, “a bloody good cook”. Occasionally we were treated to that succulent white breast meat from the culls, and a special feast was often a chook for Sunday dinner. My brother, Billy, is also a great fancier of the Campine, so much so, that in the books of Australian Poultry Standards, you will notice that he had sponsored the colour plate for the Gold Campines. My wife and I breed both Gold and Silver, but my personal preference is for the Silver. When one looks at this fowl on the ground against a beautiful green grass background, in my humble opinion, this fowl has an appeal that is second to none.

I have an extensive collection of rare Campine books and memorabilia that goes back to the 1902, and I have had copies (not the originals) of the collection leather-bound by a bookbinder, such is my dedication to this fascinating breed. In 1998 I started on my own book “The Charm of the Campine” on the breed, of which a prototype has been shown and admired by many fanciers. However, if I ever get this saga finished, it will be a miracle.

From my research the original main foundation importation of Campines to Australia was in 1895 & 1909 by Charles Mallet-Simon. They bred well in Australian conditions, however they weren’t here in any significant numbers.

After the conclusion of World War 1 in 1918, an Australian infantryman soldier, Captain John Chaffey, brought several breeding age fowls back to Australia. These fowls were to have the biggest influence on the Campine history in this country. John Edward Chaffey, the son of a poultry breeder in NSW, joined that state’s Parliament in 1920 and by 1923 he was appointed as the NSW Minister for Agriculture. Chaffey’s love of the Campine brought him into contact with Rev. E. Lewis Jones and it was Chaffey who helped Mr William G. Allatt to be the first major volume importer of Campine stocks from The Rev E. Lewis Jones’s collection. The Allatt-Chaffey combination imported about 100 assorted young Campines by sea freight from Great Britain. William G. Allatt became the founding Secretary of the Campine Club of Australia and held that position for many years until his passing in 1941. The Campine club’s demise was during World War 2. Chaffey was unfortunately killed in a car accident in 1933, but before his death he persuaded Allatt to distribute the Campine to many parts of Australia. It was W.W. Scott, a great poultry-man, character, writer and Australorp breeder that helped Chaffey get settings of eggs to breeders in South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. There was also significant help from “Poultry Newspaper” editor Mr. Joseph Partington, and distinguished poultry-man and part time writer, Joe Maude.

I noticed in one of my old books an eulogy on the beautiful Campine headed “Campine Cackle”. At the time the title appeared to me to be rather opposite as the cackle is more like a conversation, as they certainly get very vocal in the company of people. It is as if they almost try to have a conversation with you, particularly the females. We also breed Australorps and Langshans, and our Campines are the “clowns’’ of the paddocks as they just have that certain way of getting into mischief. With a Campine, one could say that Actions speak louder than words”, as they are a ferocious digger and are a fully active fowl, running everywhere with great vigour and speed.
Some thoughts on my observations of the Campine from egg to eggs. The egg from which the Campines are produced is one of nature’s masterpieces, of a brilliant usable size, has a wonderful strong shell of perfect whiteness and was one of the reasons that Campines eggs used to take the egg competition prizes, all over the world in egg shows of days gone by. My wife has shown plates of their bright white eggs at Sydney Royal over the years for great success. She’s even won beautiful ribbons and rosettes.

As the egg progresses during incubation, the whiteness of the shell becomes more intensified. The opaqueness caused by the development of the embryo increases the bluish-whiteness of the egg so that a tray full produces a startling effect. The attractive fluffy chick emerges as a rich golden brown or to a beautiful cream, or to buff and/or chocolate-brown. This may sound confusing but as chicks they have a plethora of colours. One distinct trait is an “emu-style” stripe on its head and neck which makes it without doubt the prettiest chick in the domain of poultry. It hatches out strongly and starts to grow, and grow it does, and then one has to be on the lookout for trouble as it gets into all likely spots for a feed. It much prefers what it finds itself to what it is given. So watch out if you have any long wet grass, because they can get wet from activity and inquisitiveness. From the baby chicken age it develops quickly and at six weeks old you may even hear the adolescent male trying to crow. They are so developed that they resemble a fully grown Campine, but in miniature. Unlike many other varieties of fowls, they have no obvious gawky stage.

Roaming far and wide and practically self-supporting, the Campine has a preference for tall treetops and fowl pen roofs rather than the fowl pens themselves. You have to get up early to beat the Campine. They are always first off the perch in the mornings, scratching around and almost burrowing for something that it’s cute brain tells it is there. You seldom find a Campine on choice hanging around from its early rise till feeding time. It will fill up first and then if there is any more room it will get a wee bit more in. You don't have to feed a Campine like other fowls; they have a unique way of foraging. My wife calls them the “bush pigs” of the fowl world, and they burrow and dig like a tractor implement. They “help” her with her garden, help that she doesn't really need!

When the female Campine matures, which is anything from five to seven months old, it does not start off with a violent rush. She selects a cosy corner to lay her eggs, and herein is a problem for Campine breeders. Once you gather up her eggs, assuming that you can find them, the next day she will find another good spot. And unless you pen her in, all her life she will find a multitude of new and exciting places to lay her eggs. During one cold winter we left our slasher in the shed for over three months.

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MALE CHARACTERISTICS
CARRIAGE: Alert and graceful
TYPE:
Body broad, close and compact
Back rather long, narrowing to the tail.
Breast full and round
Wings large and neatly tucked
Tail carried fairly high and well spread
Campine males are hen feathered, without sickles or pointed neck and saddle hackles.
The two top tail feathers slightly curved.
HEAD: Moderately long, deep and inclined to width.
Beak rather short
Eyes prominent.
Comb single, upright, of medium size, evenly serrated, the
back well carried out and clear of the neck; free from excrescences.
Face smooth
Ear-lobes inclined to almond shape, medium size, free from wrinkles.
Wattles fine and long.

NECK
Moderately long and well covered with hackle feathers.
The formation of the neck feathers in the Campine is called the cape.
LEGS & FEET
Legs moderately long
Shanks and feet free from feathers
Toes four, slender and well spread

FEMALE CHARACTERISTICS
With the exception of the single comb which falls gracefully over one side of the face, the general characteristics are similar to those of the male, allowing for the natural sexual differences.

Scale of Points for Judges
Type & Size 20
Head (Comb, Eyes & Lobes ~ 5 each) 15
Colour (Cape & Sheen 10 each) 20
Markings 25
Tail (Development & Carriage) 5
Legs & Feet 5
Condition 10
Total 100

COLOURS:

The Gold Campine
GOLD Male and Female Plumage:
Head and neck hackle: rich gold, not a washed out yellow. Remainder beetle green barring on rich gold ground colour. Every feather must be barred in a transverse direction with the end (or tip) of the feather, gold. The bars to be clear with well defined edges, running across the feather. so as to form, as near as possible, rings around the body. Barring to be three times as wide as ground colour.
On the breast and underparts of the body should be straight or slightly curved; on the back, shoulders saddle and tail they may be of a V-shaped pattern, but preferably straight

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THE CAMPINE - AUSTRALIAN STANDARDS

The Silver Campine

SILVER Male and Female Plumage:
Head and neck hackle: pure white. Remainder beetle green barring on pure white ground colour. The markings being identical to those of the Gold.

In Both Sexes and Both Varieties:
Beak ivory horn. Eyes dark brown with black pupil. Comb face and wattles bright red.
Ear-lobes white. Legs and feet leaden blue. Toenails ivory horn.

SERIOUS DEFECTS
Sickle feathers or pointed hackles on the males. Bars and ground colour of equal width. Ground colour pencilled. Comb at the back too near to the neck Side sprigs or spikes on comb. Legs other than leaden blue. White in face. Red eyes. Feather or down on shanks. Dark pigmentation in combs of females. White toe-nails. Slate blue beak. Black around the eye.
Note: the ideal is a bird clearly, distinctly and evenly barred all over with the sole exception of the neck hackle.
Taking the five main points of the bird -viz. Neck hackle, top (including back shoulders and saddle) tail, wings. and breast - each is of much importance as another.

Judges are requested to bear in mind that a specimen excelling in one or two particulars, but defective in others should
stand no chance against one of the fair average merit throughout.

Special attention should be paid to size, type and fullness of the front in breeding and judging Campines.
Weights: Male 2.50 - 2.95 kg Female 2.00 - 2.50 kg

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My Anxious Concern

I believe that the Committee of the Australian Poultry Standards, for their Second Edition published in 2012, made a decisive mistake in describing the feathers of Male Campines. From the original First Edition, of 1998, they added in the Second Edition (on Page 62 in Male Characteristics - Type) the statement below:

“Campine males may tend towards hen feathering”

The phrasing “may tend towards” definitely conflicts with the ideals held by most experienced Campine breeders, exhibitors and historians. The plain facts are that Campine Males ARE hen-feathered. No ifs, no buts, no maybes. They emphatically have been, and always will be, hen-feathered to any well-informed Campine breeder since the 1890’s. I can’t emphasise the seriousness of this
anomaly by the Australian Poultry Standards Committee.


(continued from page 3 - above)

When we got the slasher ready to mow for the after-spring cut, we hauled it out with the tractor, and found dozens of fresh and older laid Campine eggs in about six or seven neat little bundles under the slasher. If you let them run free, don’t assume they don’t lay. They Do! And with great vigour! We have had birds that have laid in July after a few weeks rest before completing the moult. To a Campine female it makes little difference whether she has a fine or course pelvic structure, deep or shallow keel between the pelvis and the keel. One hen, we owned, had a pelvis bone almost as thick as a finger and she laid 101 eggs, that we could find, in her eighth year.

Most Campines however have fine bones which are easily spread so they do not spend all day on the nest. They lay their egg quickly and then go back to foraging and socialising during the day.

You don't see too many Campines in the show pens these days at normal club poultry shows, although most clubs do try to cater for them. I’ve shown them for a great many years but the disappointing fact is that in 90% of shows I have had little or no real competition. Just mainly my Campines against my Campines. It’s frustrating not to be able to compare your fowls against others in the show arenas. Most Royal Shows encourage Campines and other Rare Breed exhibits, in stand-alone classes, for their uniqueness. Several breeds are so unusual that they are an added attraction for the public, who wouldn't normally get to experience such rare varieties. Generally, Royal Shows pride themselves as a showcase for the majority of the fowls represented in the Australian Poultry Standards. For several years, we had successfully shown Campines at Brisbane Royal in AOV classes and often won the AOV Champion & Reserve. After many years of frustrating and difficult lobbying to get them out of the AOV classes, stand-alone Campine classes were appreciatively included, which we supported with abundant numbers of exhibits. For some mysterious reason the powers to be at Brisbane Royal decided to drop those precious Campine classes - so as a protest I dropped the Brisbane Royal. That was a obvious dim-witted mistake by that Royal Show’s poultry committee for prospective Campine breeders! As a consequence we simply don’t show there anymore, and I might add that includes all breeds.

For almost two decades we have taken a show team down to Sydney Royal, and that challenge has given us several Champion & Reserve Champion Campine awards. In 2006 we picked up Champion Campine at Sydney Royal, as well as Reserve Champion Light Soft Feather - a miracle. I’ve never seen a Campine “out the front” at Sydney Royal, but here’s hoping that one day it might happen. The Campine doesn't really like those 10 to 14 day shows being penned and will often shake their heads in a nervous manner to emphasise their disapproval at being penned up. They do have a tendency to fret.

In July 2006, a good old mate of mine Kevvy Gibb and I took a team of our Campines, and Kev’s Malay Game, to the Inaugural Rare Breeds Show at Maitland in NSW. It was a10 hour drive to get them to the venue. There were large entries of Campines and several Malays, as well as 478 other rare breeds and colours. We were overwhelmed to win Bird of Show with a Silver Campine cockerel, and my mate, Kevvy was awarded Reserve of Show with his Malay cockerel. To us that was like breeding, training and winning the Melbourne Cup!! Kevvy and I couldn’t believe it - we were so excited. The sad part about the trek to Maitland was during our plans for their 2007 show, Kevin Gibb passed away suddenly. They award an annual memorial trophy for him, but I haven’t been back - it’s a tough call for me. That Championship win in Maitland felt as spectacular as winning Champion Campine at Poultry 2004 & 2008 in Canberra.

Visitors to our property often comment on just how quiet and friendly our Campines are and one of our secrets in bringing then up peacefully is to mix them in with the Australorp chickens and they tend to take on the gentle demure of the Australorp, and yet retain that exciting and dynamic trait of the Campine. Many years ago, Mr. Pat Birchall from Mudgee NSW said to me, “every breeder should have at least one rare breed in their pens.” This way rare breeds will survive and flourish and we couldn't agree more with Pat’s theory. Our rare breed choice is the Campine.

The Campine is a fascinating breed and a true challenge to get those unique stripes and feather patterns to perfection.
It is with us as with every other breeder of the fowl…..

“Once a Campinist, always a Campinist.” Thanks from Ross Summerell

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The Campine, Its Origin, Value and Possibilities
For the Campine Club of Australia’s Feature Poultry Newspaper - 15th September 1923
by Joe Maude Snr.

The Campine (pronounced Kampeen) is one of the oldest breeds of poultry in existence and probably one of the best or it would have ceased to exist many years ago: for the Belgian peasant is not likely to have bred them for centuries had they not been profitable to keep; the Dutch Braeckel, which is a very similar fowl and the Campine no doubt had a common origin and both are descended from the same tap root, as did the pencilled Hamburg, though the latter breed, as at present constituted, is a pure English production, and it is due to the skill of English breeders that we have the standard Campine of today; a bird that is quite different in markings to the birds imported from Belgium on or about 20 years ago; especially is this so in the markings of the males.

The Belgian males originally imported into England were clear white on the top with barred tails, barred wing ends and breasts, and well furnished tails, like pencilled Hamburghs show cocks, but English fanciers chancing to breed birds that resembled the pullets, made them their ideal. This was a wise step to take and no doubt they got their lesson from the chitty Hamburgh breeders who, by breeding from two pens for years, had made practically two varieties. viz. a cockerel sort and a pullet sort, causing fanciers to have to breed from two distinct strains to have any chance of success in the show pen: which, to persons with limited space or means has sometimes proved a great stumbling block; thus we find that in Hamburghs there are exhibitors who always show males and others, hens or pullets and the novice purchasing a winning cockerel and a winning hen and mating the two together could not breed a bird
worth a rap and thus many young men that would have made capital fanciers- got disgusted and went out of the fancy quickly. By making the standard for the male Campines that of a hen-feather, marked like the female; the English and American clubs for the breed make it easy for anyone who purchased good specimens to breed as good as they bought and thus the breed has come to stay.

The Campine in Australia has had a chequered career, principally through being in the hands of new fanciers with no previous experience in breeding exhibition poultry. To get rich quick was the main object of the greater percentage of those who first took
them up; and not having brains enough to know that if a success is to be made of any breed of fowls that you must house and feed your stock birds well and also keep your chicks going from the time of hatching until such times as they are old enough to tell whether they are good specimens or not; and when such times arrive kill off all the mediocre specimens; for to sell such like birds is only to disgust your customers and damn a good breed and this is what some of the original fanciers of Campines actually did.

The club which was formed during the past twelve months is more than likely to resuscitate the breed, for it is composed of fanciers that have its welfare at heart and that are eager to improve the breed. Mr W. G. Allatt, Gelling Ave, Strathfield, is the Hon. Secretary, the President being Mr A. H. Burns, whilst the members of the club number no less than thirty-five.

At this year's Royal Show the entry totalled 26 in four classes which is the largest number got together for a number of years, and it is worthy of note that the cockerels numbered 7, and the pullets 10; and it is fully anticipated that the entry at next year's shows will be twice as big as those of the past and a general improvement in quality is expected, as several importations have been and are being made. The Campine as a layer, is second to nothing and they lay large white shelled eggs. In America, the prizes have been won on many occasions in competitions for white shelled eggs, which for size, quality and pure whiteness of the shell have beaten
Leghorn eggs time out of number.

Campines were originally all of the silver variety, the goldens being an English production and beautiful as the golden variety are, the marked contrast between green, black and pure white found in the best specimens of the silvers is always likely to find more favour than their golden brethren. There has been a lot of controversy going on in the English "Feathered World" lately, principally over
the awards at the last International Show; it seems there is a tendency by judges to favour the Hamburg markings and as rose combed Campines have been heading the classes at many shows it is a pretty sure sign that some breeders in England have been
crossing the two varieties; because Belgian fanciers have a positive objection against any bird with a rose-comb being designated a Campine and although the Hamburg is what was known in the old days as the everlasting layer the pencilled variety lay such small eggs that to cross them with Campines means a decided reduction in size of the eggs and also of the body of the fowl; besides the markings of the two varieties are most distinct according to their respective standards, so it is hard to find where the benefit to the Campine is to come in by crossing and personally, I would not feed either a rose-combed Minorca, Leghorn or Campine because it was a matter of impossibility to breed a rosecombed fowl from any of the original Mallet-Simon pure birds of any of the respective varieties.

Joe Maude Snr - 1923


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 7:45 pm 
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Gallant Game
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Ripper Ross ...

You Beauty!

Your presentation at Rosewood was one of the best I have ever heard ... professional, entertaining and informative.

Thanks so much for putting this here on BYP.

I absolutely know that almost anyone who heard your words would want Campines. I have to say I just came home and opened the gates. there is nothing better than watching the Campine out and about.

These birds are so much better than goldfish!

Great to see you in shape Ross.

Cheers and thankyou.

Peter

People, Ross does know heaps about the beautiful Campine and between us we would just love to see many more long term custodians of this marvellous breed.

SIMPLY CHARMING.

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The Campine Club of Australia has a web-site at: http://www.campines.org

Campines ... the beautiful breed!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:27 pm 
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Gallant Game
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Thanks so much for posting this. What a great breed profile.
The history and personal stories really bring it to life along with lots of detailed information.
I have really enjoyed reading but look forward to coming back to it as a reference.
Thanks again.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:33 pm 
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Gallant Game
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After talking with Ross I hope to have the original digital version available on http://www.campines.org very soon.

Thanks again Ross.

Peter

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The Campine Club of Australia has a web-site at: http://www.campines.org

Campines ... the beautiful breed!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 10:19 am 
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Here is the original digital file at 6.6MB Click here to download Campine Presentation by Ross Summerell at FCAQ 2013 - 6.6MB PDF

But for those who would like a smaller, but still high quality file, here it is at 2.43MB. I would recommend this one. Click here to download Campine Presentation by Ross Summerell at FCAQ 2013 - 2.43MB PDF

View of 2.43MB document:

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:14 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Thanks so much for posting! I love my "campeens". I think i am the only person in my area who calls them this, i am always hearing " cam pines". They are so friendly snd inqusitive, a true chook of the people, as my husband says.
I would love to buy your book if you ever finish it!

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Devoted Caretaker of:Gold Campines, Silver Campines, Silver Spangled Hamburgs, Salmon Faverolles, Croad Langshans, Australorps, Lavender Araucanas and others :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:06 pm 
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Discerning Duck
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I think you need to find somewhere to put tips on raising Campine, as you can run into a few problems if you don't know much about the breed.

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The majestic Campine.
Should be classed as a game bird.


Last edited by kazlee on Fri Aug 16, 2013 4:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 5:57 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Mundoolun - Gold Coast Hinterlands Qld
I had an email from a fellow Campine breeder who asked me how to put the combinations together to breed the true two colours of the Campine. He suggested that I share it here.

It's pretty simple really
Silver Male over Silver Female = Silver Cockerels and Silver Pullets
Golden Male over Golden Female = Golden Cockerels and Golden Pullets
Silver Male over Golden Female = Golden Cockerels and Silver Pullets
Golden Male over Silver Female = Silver Cockerels and Golden Pullets.

If you get any other colour other than Silver or Gold then you do not have pure Campine blood, unless you get an extremely rare Sports White.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:27 pm 
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Great Game
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Thanks Ross. I expect that Campines are a bit like most breeds that the silver cockerels from the last cross might be a bit yellow rather than the bright silver of a silver by silver mating. I have a bit of experience with golden (or yellow) ducking OEG. Don't want to steer the thread off-topic as the info here is great.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:36 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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blackleghorn wrote:
Thanks Ross. I expect that Campines are a bit like most breeds that the silver cockerels from the last cross might be a bit yellow rather than the bright silver of a silver by silver mating. I have a bit of experience with golden (or yellow) ducking OEG. Don't want to steer the thread off-topic as the info here is great.

No, absolutely not, Kevin. A Silver Cockerel by a Golden Male breeds like a true Silver Campine. It still should be bright, it's a part of the breeds unique idiosyncrasies.
I've never had any evidence of yellowing. If any yellowing is present then you know that they are not pure and may have had Hamburg or some other concoction added to the past bloodlines.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:43 pm 
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Great Game
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Thanks Ross


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:13 pm 
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Thanks so much for that fantastic profile. I had read parts of it before but it was great to read again.

Ross Summerell wrote:
No, absolutely not, Kevin. A Silver Cockerel by a Golden Male breeds like a true Silver Campine. It still should be bright, it's a part of the breeds unique idiosyncrasies.
I've never had any evidence of yellowing. If any yellowing is present then you know that they are not pure and may have had Hamburg or some other concoction added to the past bloodlines.


I have bred campines for 25 years Ross, and that's is exactly my experience too.

Ross talks about his win at Canberra 2004 with a (in my opinion) wonderful cockerel. I well remember taking, I thought, a fair team to Canberra that year, but as soon as I saw Ross's cockerel I knew I would have to settle for second! He was a ripper.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:22 pm 
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Fiesty Fowl
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Ross Summerell wrote:
If you get any other colour other than Silver or Gold then you do not have pure Campine blood, unless you get an extremely rare Sports White.

Or extremely rare gold diluter gene (ig) that makes them cream :)

Matt

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Last edited by ayam goreng on Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:24 pm 
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Great Game
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Location: Hamilton Vic
Thanks Ross and DenisL - that is very interesting it shows that there must be something else at play than the standard silver/gold relationship in Campines, as in all breeds I know of a Ss (silver male split for gold) does show some lack of brightness, perhaps this was a reason that the original use of Campines in the sex-linkage work of Punnett at Cambridge was such a good choice. Likely some other modifying gene at work.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:33 pm 
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Fiesty Fowl
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Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 9:56 pm
Posts: 1166
Location: Hunter Valley
Ross Summerell wrote:
Silver Male over Silver Female = Silver Cockerels and Silver Pullets
Golden Male over Golden Female = Golden Cockerels and Golden Pullets
Silver Male over Golden Female = Golden Cockerels and Silver Pullets
Golden Male over Silver Female = Silver Cockerels and Golden Pullets.

The cockerels in the 3rd and 4th matings will be split gold/silver

Matt


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