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PostPosted: Sat Jul 02, 2016 4:13 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:17 pm
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Would like advice on how to store eggs before incubating, particularly where, light conditions and temperature.
barrycon


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 02, 2016 4:56 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Exact temp is not critical. Commercial establishments probably control this more than necessary. Cool, room temp. is adequate.
My guest bathroom is the coolest and most stable temp in my house. I store eggs in an egg carton on the floor of the shower recess. The important thing is to change the angle of the eggs at least a couple of times a day. Use another egg carton to raise alternate end of the carton. Do this an odd no of times so that opposite sides of the eggs have the long over night period. About 12 hours before setting (if you remember) bring the eggs into a warmer environment. (not crucial)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 4:44 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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thanks for that. Didn't know about tilting at all. Certainly will put all that into practice next batch.
barrycon


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:49 pm 
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Golden Swan
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I use my kitchen bench where I have a bit of extra space. The kitchen temperature is pretty stable and I see the egg carton so remember to tilt each day!

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 6:30 am 
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Great Game
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I use the third bathroom, off the laundry, the incubator is set up in there, it only gets used by me unless its summer and then its used for people who have been swimming in the pool. I tilt them as well not too hard to remember, if i had them in the house the missus would give them to her cousins,sister to eat :roll: .


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 11:22 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Location: Locker Valley
Sorry to hijack the post. But how long can you store eggs before incubating and how cold is too cold??


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 1:58 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Antz, maximum recommended storing time is 10 days (with good management) although up to 2 weeks may still give success. Not sure of minimum temp. but I tend to think 'Spring day time temperature' (10 -20) is probably sensible.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 2:09 pm 
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Golden Robin
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Storing them in the fridge is not a good idea though. Australian fridges are generally set to reflect our climate and to give near icy cold drinks like beer, wine and soft drinks on or near four degrees centigrade.

At that four degrees changes in the structure of the water molecules begins to change and ice crystals begin to start to form. An egg has content of water as well as proteins and nutrients. The sheer cold and the fact the water/ice crystal enlarge begins to damage the protein structure. A frozen (partially or totally) is a dead egg.

Mike

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 6:32 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Re-using egg cartons over and over is also to be avoided (especially if the eggs are soiled).
The commercial eggs bought in them are sterilised.
However, your own eggs would be covered in pathogens.
The incubator will incubate those just as happily.
Cheers

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 7:39 pm 
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Golden Robin
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Redlander wrote:
Re-using egg cartons over and over is also to be avoided (especially if the eggs are soiled).
The commercial eggs bought in them are sterilised.
However, your own eggs would be covered in pathogens.
The incubator will incubate those just as happily.
Cheers


As a medical microbiologist, I agree with the continual usage of the same carton but I disagree with the concept implication that back yard eggs should be sterilised as the sterilisation process will remove much of the antimocrobial "bloom" on the egg shell surface.

I also disagree that the surface would be covered in pathogens. On any unsterilised surface there will be pathtogens and non-pathogens in abundance. The mix of both keep one another in check and balance. Its when you play games with chemicals that you begin to select out unwanted dominance of either.

For badly soiled eggs, if they cant be cleaned by using dry steel wool or similar then discard them for incubation. For lightly soiled eggs, scrub them while they are dry with a dry brush or steel wool and make a subjective decision on their usage. An egg has thousands of pores on the egg shell and these are subject to positive and negative pressures. Positive means that more is coming out of the egg and therefore inhibiting the ingress of any bacterial pathogen. Negative means that the egg is actually sucking air along with anything small enough to pass through the pore. If that is the 1% of bacteria that were not balanced or killed by sterilisation then you have a potential problem.

Commercial hatcheries have an entirely different different set of values and needs to the average backyarder.

Mike

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