Backyard Poultry Forum • View topic - One of our new hens foaming at mouth - HELP advise needed!

Backyard Poultry Forum

Chickens, waterfowl & all poultry - home of exhibition & backyard poultry in Australia & New Zealand
Login with a social network:
It is currently Sun Oct 25, 2020 1:34 am

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:09 am 
Offline
Dapper Duck
Dapper Duck

Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:34 pm
Posts: 25
Hi all,

This morning, we came out to check on our newly acquired Isa Brown hens (They have now been with us for about 1.5 weeks). 3 of the girls were happy to come out of their house for a wander. Our 4th girl we noticed was still asleep in her roost and upon closer inspection we noticed she had quite a lot of drool like substance coming from her mouth area. The front of chest was covered in the foamy slime like drool substance.

We are in Sydney, and it was quite a hot day yesterday and we have had a lot of rain overnight as well. (wondering whether that has anything to do with it)

1. Is it normal for them to sleep this long (its now past 9am) when normally she is out and about foraging for scraps and bugs.
2. What is this stuff coming out of her mouth? Is this normal?
3. Upon inspection, she was quite docile - didn't kick up a fuss when we picked her up.
4. After inspection - she has gone back to sleeping?

Do you think there is anything wrong with our girl? we are a bit worried and being novices we don't know if this is normal or not?


any advice is greatly appreciated

THanks
Lombi


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:40 am 
Offline
Champion Bird
Champion Bird
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:58 pm
Posts: 973
Location: Vincentia NSW
It certainly isn't normal - but as to what is the cause I couldn't say as I have never come across anything like this. Hopefully one of the more expereinced will get on soon and comment.

Just got this of Wikianswers - not sure how true it is but anyway

"Im not sure of the exact answer but I believe its a physiological response to cold. Eg if a bird roosts outside on a cold night it will (due to shivering) foam at the mouth. Also it will refuse to come down from its roost until it warmed up sufficiently."


Last edited by cheekychick on Sat Feb 13, 2010 10:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:52 am 
Offline
Wise One
Wise One

Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 2:42 pm
Posts: 2695
Location: Canberra
No it is not normal.

I am not sure about he foaming at the mouth as a response to cold. I would put this in good samaritan if I were you.

We have a few members that are vets and a lot who have a lot of experience with chickens and the illnesses they can get.

In the meantime, just to be safe, can you put her somewhere else away from the othre chickens in a dry warm place - perhaps a nice warm box within a playpen inside?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 10:04 am 
Offline
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 8:44 am
Posts: 31530
Location: Morayfield, SEQ
No, that's not normal. Something's wrong.

There's a few possibilities. You need to check her over. It could be an infection, a respiratory infection of some sort, even a crop problem. Feel over her crop area - it's at the front of her body. Here a diagram:
Image
See if you can feel food/material in the crop. It's like a bag at the front of her chest. See what it feels like - whether it's empty, or whether it's watery and bloated, or whether it's hard and firm like a ball of grain, or whether it's hard like a ball of plasticene.

What have they been eating? Have they had long cut grass put in their pen for them?

Also feel over her body, particularly around the breast bone. See if it's sharp and pointy with no flesh on either side of it, or if it's a little rounded with some meat on either side. Have a look at her vent and see if there is droppings or anything stuck around the area. Tell us about the colour, consistency & smell. In fact, it would be a good idea to answer the questions in this list: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=7955698

A chicken that is docile and lethargic is sick. They hide illness for as long as they can as weakness makes them a target for predators. Once you see signs of illness it's something to pay attention to.

The wet, warm weather does seem to bring the viral illness out and increases problems with parasites etc, but chickens can still get sick in all climates.

_________________
image
Backyard Poultry Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 10:42 am 
Offline
Dapper Duck
Dapper Duck

Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:34 pm
Posts: 25
hi all,

thank you for the quick responses. In response to CHICKEN07 questions:

1. she is still drooling (but no foam now and not as excessive as when we first saw her)
2. She has perked up slightly and is now fully awake. She ventured outside with the other hens but still quiet and docile
3. I have checked her CROP area and it feels firm (like a plasticine consistency)
4. She has been given layer crumbles, water and greens from our garden (Kale, lettuce). She also has access to long grass.
5. Her breastbone is sharp and pointy
6. Her vent is quite clean and clear , with no odour present
7. Her breathing seems to be normal and she is clucking quietly every so often.
8. Also note she is approximately 18 weeks old
9. I don't think its a response to cold, as its actually been quite hot and humid here


Hope this helps? Any further advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
Lombi


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:20 am 
Offline
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 8:44 am
Posts: 31530
Location: Morayfield, SEQ
If her crop feels firm like plasticene first thing in the morning, then I would say she has an impacted crop. This is basically when the food sticks together and creates a blockage that doesn't move through the digestive system. It stays there, sometimes getting bigger and creating a horrible smell that you may notice if you smell the chicken's breath. Usually when this happens it is as a result of long whole blades of grass getting swallowed and becoming matted inside the crop. That starts it off and then it develops into a solid immovable ball. That's one reason why giving chickens cut grass clippings can increase the chances of this happening, but chickens can still develop it if they peck long lengths of grass themselves. I have had chickens that age get into my vegie garden which has young elastic grass shoots in there and get the same result. It basically starves the chicken as no significant amount of nutrition gets through the crop. Sometimes it can go on for a while before the chicken shows real signs of illness as it becomes more emaciated and weak.

I'm not sure if this is the only problem your chicken has but there are a couple of things you can do to try and improve this particular problem for her. You can trickle about a teaspoon of olive olive into her beak, just a little at time and let her swallow it herself. Also give her a teaspoon of natural yoghurt (or other probiotic) in the same way. If the yoghurt is firm just dilute it a tiny bit with slightly warm water. Don't make a big volume as she may have limited room in her crop. Don't squirt it down her throat. Once that's gone down, leave her for about quarter of an hour and then gently massage that blob in the crop. Be gentle as the crop can be damaged, but it is important to gradually break up that lump as much as possible. Then leave her in a separate area so you can control what she's eating. Don't give her any grains, just access to her crumble and water. Then check on her progress tonight and repeat the oil, yoghurt & massage process. Then you hope that overnight the broken up crop contents will feed through into the digestive system.

Check her first thing in the morning and see if there is a reduction of the size and consistency of what's in the crop. If there's a little improvement, but it's still there, then you do it again. Also take note of any droppings she does overnight.

In some cases, crop disorders can be accompanied by fungal or bacterial infections so take note of they type of smell you detect and let us know whether it's yeasty, or whatever. Sometimes a little early intervention with massage and probiotics can help the bird deal with minor issues themselves without medicaton.

_________________
image
Backyard Poultry Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 32 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
©2004-2014 Backyardpoultry.com. Content rights reserved
freestone