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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 8:39 pm 
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Gallant Game
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I've read the same advice in a few poultry publications about having your soil and/or eggs tested for harmful chemical residues that could enter the food chain, especially organophosphates that remain persistent for years. The theory is that if you run chickens on areas where these chemicals are present then they enter the chicken, are fat soluble so persist in the chicken and then enter the egg where we get a dose when we eat them.

Even fertile natural areas that were previously used for farming can harbour these chemicals (apparently).

It is expensive to test, and tests and results vary in type and effectiveness.

I've always figured I'll just take my chances along with everyone else, in the same vein as being hit by a bus or eaten by a shark. But am I being flippant? Is there a strong case for following the advice?

I wonder.

ML

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PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 12:27 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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My feelings would be that if you can do something about the residue, and have the resources to test for them, then go right ahead.

If you're testing just for the sake of knowing what you're going to continue to ingest, then what's the point if it's expensive?

If the results would make you change what you're doing... and you were in a position to change what you're doing (eg. if you then had to buy cage eggs as a way of avoiding these residues, would you? Presuming that cage eggs don't contain them)... would you?


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PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 6:26 pm 
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Old Mother Goose
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Sorry but OPs (Organophosphates) are not persistent in soil, you probably mean OCs (organochlorines) these are things like DDT and dieldrin, yes these will last for years and years in soil and are lipophilic they will breakdown but depends on things like soil pH, moisture content, organic matter and sunlight.



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PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 8:17 pm 
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Gallant Game
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rotten_66 wrote:
Sorry but OPs (Organophosphates) are not persistent in soil, you probably mean OCs (organochlorines) these are things like DDT and dieldrin, yes these will last for years and years in soil and are lipophilic they will breakdown but depends on things like soil pH, moisture content, organic matter and sunlight.

Yeah, that's the stuff, organochlorines then... :doh

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PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 9:19 pm 
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Golden Brush Turkey
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there are still places in wa unable to export beef to the us due to the organochlorines in teh soil. very sad fro hte farmers. i am sure it m ust have happened in other parts of hte country.

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PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 9:46 pm 
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Wise Wyandotte
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Around SEQld they were used in cattle dips, potato farming and termite prevention (which they were very good at). So if you have land with that sort of history, testing might be warrented. However if the test comes up positive enough then the site gets listed on the contaminated sites register. That has lots of implications


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 8:53 am 
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Old Mother Goose
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Some parts of Victoria that were areas where traditionally potatoes, and to a smaller extent tobacco, were grown are grossly contaminated and will be, by estimation, for, the next 100-130 years!! This is Dieldrin mainly but DDT as well, it was used to control wireworm in potatoes. The pesticide used to come premixed in the superphosphate fertiliser but what was not realised/known back in the 50s/60s/70s was the pesticide application for this year was enough to cover the next 5-8 years and by adding it every year for 15-20 years it built up in the soil.

As far as "de-contaminating" the soil there is not much you can do, working the soil and incorporating plenty of organic matter will help stimulate the soil microflora and fauna this can aid breakdown but time is the biggest assistance.

For me it might be best to not know, as knowing might only cause you grief and worry and the key is "worrying about things you can change and recognising those you can't",



Ron

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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 9:10 am 
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Champion Bird
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Just as an indication of costs, I've just had 2 soil samples tested for organochlorines by ALS in Scoresby.
Total was $182.50 including the admin charge.

I did the sampling following DSE guidelines.
Results were just a straight out amount present with no interpretation.

DDT and Dieldrin are prevalent in the dairy areas of West Gippsland where they were used to spray maize/corn to kill the bugs before the maize was fed to the cows and for external parasites on the cows.

Jacquie

P.S. The soil samples had undetectable amounts present. :woot:


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 11:32 am 
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Wise Wyandotte
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We have an old cattle dip on the contaminated lands register. Previously it had to be excluded from cattle grazing, then it had to be remediated by inverting the soil down to about a metre. My understanding is that was enough to take it off the exclusiuon from cattle category to just listed on the register.


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 1:27 pm 
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Champion Bird
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The troubling thing with the organochlorine, eg DDT and Dieldrin, contaminations is that you can still graze cattle on the contaminated land aslong as they are moved to a clean paddock 6 months before being sent to market.

There's currently a farmer grazing Friesian heifers on land that is 10 times the allowable contamination amount.
They'll be in the food supply chain after 4 months on clean pasture.

Another thing you're allowed to do is cut hay to 10cms above soil level off contaminated pasture and feed it to grazing animals intended for the market.

Doesn't seem right to me.

Jacquie


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Hatchling
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Hi Jacquie,

I was wondering if you can provide more feedback on the issue you mention regarding these comments
"The troubling thing with the organochlorine, eg DDT and Dieldrin, contaminations is that you can still graze cattle on the contaminated land aslong as they are moved to a clean paddock 6 months before being sent to market.

There's currently a farmer grazing Friesian heifers on land that is 10 times the allowable contamination amount.
They'll be in the food supply chain after 4 months on clean pasture.

Another thing you're allowed to do is cut hay to 10cms above soil level off contaminated pasture and feed it to grazing animals intended for the market."

do you know where I could find the official regulations allowing this practice? Are you a farmer and do you have experience on this that you could share? Im interested in doing a news story on this issue. Seem odd, to say the least, that cattle would be allowed to graze on contaminated pasture.

Thanks!

Karl


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:24 pm 
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Champion Bird
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Location: Dandenong Ranges, Melbourne
Check with the Dept of Agriculture for the latest regulations.


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