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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:31 am 
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Great Game
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Hi everyone,

I have noticed in the last week that several of my roosters combs have become dark, especially in the tips, we have had some very cold days and frosty mornings, is it possible they would get frostbite on their combs??
If this is a possibility...what , if anything can I do to prevent it? will they recover ok.

thanks in advance for any responses.

cheers
Shani

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 1:05 am 
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Phoenix
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You can get frostbite on combs of chooks
Have read people put vasaline on their combs
Corn and grains at evening helps as well.
can be other reasons as well for blackening of combs
Do they sleep in a shed or do they want to sleep out side of it like some of mine :)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:15 am 
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Superior Bird
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If it is roosters plural they may be sparring a bit or keeping younger roo's in line. Pecks and nicks look black. Even sparring through the fence as mine do they get a few nicks etc.
Wouldn't think a rooster was more susceptible to frostbite than a hen.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 7:38 am 
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Flock Master
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I heard somewhere that frostbite is the reason some people dub, i think this was an overseas web site. You might have to start knitting beanies :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 10:11 am 
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Golden Magpie
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Yes - rooster do get a frost burn. I wouldn't call it frostbite, technically thats different. It happens in roosters mostly with large prominant blade combs.

It passes in time and I dont think it causes them any real discomfort. For many years I had a OEG rooster that insisted on roosting on top of a strainer post and on - 10 C nights I would come out and he would be encrusted with frosty diamonds, even his comb.

His comb was dark mottled because of it for the winter months and a healthy red as soon as the frosts went. Combs have a very rich blood supply and repair very quickly from damage from fighting, cuts and nick as well as frost burns.

Many older breeders did/do dub older breeding roosters as the combs and wattles become a target for up and coming young roosters and if nothing else it makes the roosters look messy.

Mike

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:38 pm 
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Great Game
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Location: Longford, Gippsland, Victoria
Hi,
Yes, they all sleep in hen houses at night... and I only have one roster per pen... it's just looks like the roosters with the biggest combs (blade combs I think Mike?) seem to be getting dark on the points... they don't seem to have any injuries through fighting.

OK... what is dub ??

thanks everyone... I better get knitting those beanies eh !

cheers
Shani

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:48 pm 
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Golden Magpie
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Location: Tuross Head, NSW fsr south east coast
Dubbing is an old old practice used for fighting birds, old birds and birds with excessively large combs and wattles.

It is simply cutting off the combs and wattles with a sharp knife, scissors or a scalple. Usually done in cold weather where the blood flow was less. For a long time it was part of the standard for game birds but its no longer encouraged.

Although its barbaric to watch or practice, very few birds suffered problems and old timers still dub birds.

Fortunately now - its not a common or recognised practice.

Mike

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 7:18 pm 
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Great Game
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Hi Mike,
thanks for the explanation on dubbing, I had not heard of it before, an interesting practice and one not for the faint hearted I would imagine. :shock: :wink:

cheers

Shani

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