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PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2011 9:18 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 8:28 pm
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You know I just wish I could get up the courage, even for the OH to get up the courage. We eat that much store bought chook it's ridicoulous. Know that all things bought from the shop start out the way they are running around the yard but just can't make the leap. This has been a fantastic and very informative post, thank you so much. Maybe one day we can make the next step.

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Riles


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 11:51 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 2:49 pm
Posts: 188
Location: NT
Thanks for these clear instructions and pictures.

We successfully killed our first cockerel this morning, we ended up skinning and filleting him straight away and the pieces are in the fridge. He was only 14 weeks old and pretty small, when we got him mostly plucked we decided we didn't want a roast anyway so did it all.

Using this and YouTube to work it out it was much easier than we expected and not upsetting at all. We left the kids (3 and 6) inside for the killing, but they came out when we were processing and thought it was fascinating. Without the head and with some feathers gone he looked like meat and they deal with that all the time.

I'll have to think of something yummy to cook on Tuesday. :thanks:

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 8:25 pm 
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Champion Bird
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 9:48 pm
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Location: Sydney, Australia
Wow! I am actually tempted to go out and buy me a few meat birds now. If for nothing else than the amazing taste everyone seems to go on about.

I had to "dispatch" a young roo we raised from a chick. Broke my heart - but he was a "pet". I think I could keep objective if I knew they were meat birds.

Glad to find out I did the dispatching correctly first time round. Except I used a super sharp cleaver - not a sword!

My biggest obstacle now would be getting around my family and friends. They all still can't believe I killed our roo. I saw it as the most humane and least stressful option for HIM - wasn't thinking of myself at all.

I think they would all be very polite around me suddenly if I started "dispatching" chickens every day lol!

It's a classic example of the way death is treated in our society. No one can even imagine killing their own meat anymore!?? How pampered and lazy we have become. I think there is a sort of integrity to looking your dinner in the eye and knowing it had a good life before it ended up on your table. :) :thumbs:

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:15 pm 
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Golden Phoenix
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:39 am
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Location: Tarago, near Goulburn
I'm hoping by "meat birds" you mean "birds suitable for meat". Don't buy the poor little commercial chicks sold for meat purposes - well, at least, not more than once, from all accounts. They're just depressing to raise and not so fun to eat.

But we do have some combined experiences in eating various pure and deliberate crossbreeds.

I still gotta say that the Marans x Indian Game was spectacular in terms of size, but the Wyandottes currently have my vote for flavour. However, most of my birds are fairly random crossbreeds, and the most recent batch included Leghorns. Perfectly tasty but a bit lean (as you'd expect from a laying breed).

I have GOT to get me some IG just for eating purposes ...


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 11:14 pm 
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Champion Bird
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Lol haha!

Gonna go get me some Wyandottes! Thanks infoaddict! :thanks:

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 11:19 pm 
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Great Game
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Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 9:39 pm
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infoaddict wrote:
I'm hoping by "meat birds" you mean "birds suitable for meat". Don't buy the poor little commercial chicks sold for meat purposes - well, at least, not more than once, from all accounts. They're just depressing to raise and not so fun to eat.



^^^ what infoaddict said :thumbs:


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 8:13 am 
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Site Administrator
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 8:44 am
Posts: 31464
Location: Morayfield, SEQ
Today I came across a youtube video of a commercial shop processing halal chicken. I had never seen it done before and was surprised as how clean and efficient it was. It seemed very similar to the way a backyarder who processes their own would do it but it was so well practised and the equipment made it very quick and tidy. These people are slaughtermen and butchers so be warned - it's not about stroking the chickens or anything like that. It's a factory situation.

It's still confronting to see chickens being live slaughtered and nothing is hidden in this video so do not proceed if you are squeamish. This is pretty hard core.

So .... LIVE SLAUGHTER WARNING - DO NOT PROCEED UNLESS YOU WISH TO SEE IT.

Click on spoiler button to view.

Spoiler

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:12 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Chicken07 wrote:
Today I came across a youtube video of a commercial shop processing halal chicken. I had never seen it done before and was surprised as how clean and efficient it was. It seemed very similar to the way a backyarder who processes their own would do it but it was so well practised and the equipment made it very quick and tidy. These people are slaughtermen and butchers so be warned - it's not about stroking the chickens or anything like that. It's a factory situation.

It's still confronting to see chickens being live slaughtered and nothing is hidden in this video so do not proceed if you are squeamish. This is pretty hard core.

So .... LIVE SLAUGHTER WARNING - DO NOT PROCEED UNLESS YOU WISH TO SEE IT.

Click on spoiler button to view.

Spoiler


Not sure if you posted the right video lol. To me its a doco called The Private Life of Chickens. I watched it and it was quite interesting, but don't think it had anything to do with halal slaughter, unless I missed it.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:22 pm 
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Site Administrator
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Location: Morayfield, SEQ
Good point. Fixed it.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:54 pm 
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Golden Swan
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oh thanks Cathy. I will give it a look.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 9:57 am 
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Golden Phoenix
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:39 am
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Location: Tarago, near Goulburn
This is an older thread but still used, and I just wanted to note:

If you're processing, SHARPEN YOUR KNIVES.

I cannot emphasise how much easier it is with the right, freshly-sharpened knives. Really, really, never-been-used sharp. Use those little KlevaSharpen thingies if you must (we got given one for Xmas a few years back and it does a solid job, although I'm aware it's not how one properly sharpens a knife). Or a Wiltshire Staysharp. Just don't try to do this with blunt knives. (Ask me how I know).

As a minimum, you need one small knife to help gut and remove the crop, and one large one for cutting the legs and neck - poultry shears are best for this IF you can get ones that work.

I have poultry shears but most of them won't work on birds the age we tend to process - they've been designed for the babies in the supermarket, and just can't cope with mature bones and tendons. My favourite shears are from a KitchenAid set I got from Costco, rather then the more expensive, heavier, all-steel type I've got from kitchen shops.

I have a proper butchering set now, and find I use the curved filleting knife for the fiddly small stuff (cutting the skin to get to the crop and guts), and the heavy machete-type knife and/or the kitchen shears for taking off the legs and neck.

I have arthritis in my hands, so tend to lose fine motor control after too long - it starts aching and just losing grip. The correct knives reduce effort considerably and means I can process 13 birds in two hours without difficulty.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 11:32 am 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2015 9:29 pm
Posts: 618
Location: Victoria
infoaddict wrote:
This is an older thread but still used, and I just wanted to note:

If you're processing, SHARPEN YOUR KNIVES.

I cannot emphasise how much easier it is with the right, freshly-sharpened knives. Really, really, never-been-used sharp. Use those little KlevaSharpen thingies if you must (we got given one for Xmas a few years back and it does a solid job, although I'm aware it's not how one properly sharpens a knife). Or a Wiltshire Staysharp. Just don't try to do this with blunt knives. (Ask me how I know).

As a minimum, you need one small knife to help gut and remove the crop, and one large one for cutting the legs and neck - poultry shears are best for this IF you can get ones that work.

I have poultry shears but most of them won't work on birds the age we tend to process - they've been designed for the babies in the supermarket, and just can't cope with mature bones and tendons. My favourite shears are from a KitchenAid set I got from Costco, rather then the more expensive, heavier, all-steel type I've got from kitchen shops.

I have a proper butchering set now, and find I use the curved filleting knife for the fiddly small stuff (cutting the skin to get to the crop and guts), and the heavy machete-type knife and/or the kitchen shears for taking off the legs and neck.

I have arthritis in my hands, so tend to lose fine motor control after too long - it starts aching and just losing grip. The correct knives reduce effort considerably and means I can process 13 birds in two hours without difficulty.

Absolutely agree. Blunt knives are more dangerous, period.

Personally I don't like pull-through sharpeners as they don't give as clean a finish as a proper sharpener. The cleaner the edge, the longer it holds sharpness. With pull-through sharpeners you can never get perfectly clean edge, and you run the risk of messing up your bevel and creating micro chips along the edge.

I have a fake version of an 'Edge Pro Apex' sharpener (which are known as 'Edge Faux', lol). With good quality stones you can get a fantastic finish, I'm too lazy to strop and get a mirror finish though, lol. Oh how I want for a Wicked Edge sharpener, but there's no way I can ever justify that cost, lol.

I use a very small 6cm curved blade knife, and a 14cm filleting knife for most of the processing work with my chickens. A cleaver or shears for the neck.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 3:03 pm 
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Golden Phoenix
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Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 10:39 am
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Location: Tarago, near Goulburn
The pull-through sharpeners aren't ideal, I'll grant, for all the reasons you say.

However!

If the choice is pull-through or nothing, USE THE PULL-THROUGH.

You can fix the damage it does afterwards with a proper sharpening (I take my knives to a professional when I remember/have time - my hands just won't do sharpening). But if you're processing and realise you've forgotten to sharpen, sharpen in whatever way you can.

In particular, the knife you use for that cut to pull out the guts has got to be scalpel-sharp. It takes significant time off the whole process if you're not having to push too hard and thus break the colon. Having that level of control because the knife will slice the skin with the lightest of pressures makes all the difference.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:23 pm 
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Junior Champion Bird
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Posts: 618
Location: Victoria
Absolutely agree!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 4:34 pm 
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Gallant Game
Gallant Game

Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 3:15 pm
Posts: 517
Location: Kapunda, South Australia
I am lucky that I live in a rural area with a chook processing facility. I drop them off at 0930, tell them if I want the giblets, and come back about 1230. They are done and chilled, wrapped in their individual bags, I pay the $3.50 per cockerel, and we leave happy and contented without any trauma nor piles of feathers and stuff. They weighted them out at 2.8Kgs average, and were good eating, but next time I will get them a little younger, as the Australorps were good, but probably better in a curry.

They do all kinds of poultry, but have a sliding scale of charges.


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