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 Post subject: feed formula
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 8:42 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Tungamull QLD
I need a feed formula for poultry feed based on
meatmeal 52 % protien
wheat 12.5 %
sorghum 9 %
cracked corn 9%
black sunflower 26 %

I payed $26 for a bag of feed not happy :shock:
Tony :D

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Last edited by gameo2 on Fri Aug 05, 2005 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 8:53 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Tony
I was talking to a fellow poultry fancier to day
& he was saying he feed`s his birds poultry breeder
as chicks then changes his feed to grain . He does his
own mix but he buys bulk as it works out cheaper. :wink:
cheers
the bad one :lol: :wink: :twisted:


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:06 am 
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Dapper Duck
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Would the protein content be too high?


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:33 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Based on say wheat 12.5 % protein and meatmeal 52 % protein
grain 12.5 - protein of ration 16 % = 3.5
protein concentrate 52 % - 16 % = 36
so therefore 3.5 parts concentrate to 36 parts of wheat = 16 % protein
I just wanted someone to work out a formula of parts of grain to concentrate , because I am lazy . No one has taken up the challange .
Tony :D

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:45 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Tungamull QLD
The mix
wheat 2 parts
sorghum 1 part
corn 1 part
sunflower !/2 part
meatmeal . 437 of a part
= 16 % protein mix

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 7:39 pm 
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Tony,
The big question is have you saved any $$'s?? I thought meat meal might have been a little higher in protein than 53%?..

Sounds like you have done your homework :wink: And I bet the birds will be knocking down the pen doors when they see you coming with the feed bucket :lol:

Andy.V


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2005 10:59 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Tungamull QLD
Andy I pay $26 bag 40kg feed
mixing my own $20 bag , I use 3 x bags week saving $ 18 week
This is not takeing into account my labour , they get vitamins in their water so thats not a problem . Chicken starter is so I might get a grain cracker and do the same with them .

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 Post subject: Pellets vs Grain mix
PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 11:16 pm 
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Hatchling
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Location: Fairfield,Melbourne
:?: I feed my 5 girls a run of the mill layer pellet and some
whole grain for some extra interest, but the bulk of there food is definately the pellet.
I've spoken with some people who say if you feed a grain mix the
chooks will just eat all their equivilant of "junk food" in the grain mix,
and not eat all their vegie equivilant, so they will be getting an
unbalanced feed.

Or does the chooks instinct for eating a balanced healthy meal
have them eating properly no matter what?
By the way mine eat stacks of green leafy veg, they also
surround the dogs waiting for them to finish with the bones,
and the other day the Welsummer was running around with
a mouse then ate it, one gulp no chewing.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 8:01 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Tungamull QLD
my guys and gals get wet mash in the morning - pollard , meatmeal , cr corn , lucurne chaff etc
they have vit & min in the water , they don't miss out on much . They get better looked after than I do
Tony :D

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:09 pm 
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Showy Hen
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Location: South Australia
guess my guys and girls dont get no specific protein diet justa barley triticale mix soaked waste bread cakes etc from the local bakery and a run around the lawns each pen gets let out at least every thee or four days


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:35 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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While we're talking feed....
We were given a bag of canola seed meal last week - has anyone used this before?
I've been mixing it with our pollard ( ours get grain mix with a drop of oil to make the pollard stick) but is this the best way to use it?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 11:19 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: Tungamull QLD
DottyBantams here it is :D
Canola Meal
Canola Meal Feed Industry Guide


Poultry Diets
Canola meal is used in all types of poultry feeds. However, because of its relatively low energy value for poultry, it tends to be economically favoured in egg layer and turkey feeds rather than in high energy broiler feeds. Also, some feed users have expressed biases against using canola meal in poultry feeds due to health and performance problems that they have experienced, including hemorrhagic liver in egg layers, small egg size, leg problems in broilers, reduced feed intake and reduced growth rate. This negative view of canola meal is undeserved since virtually all of these problems can be eliminated, or at least managed effectively, once a few key points in the areas of amino acid digestibility, glucosinolate effects and dietary mineral balance are understood.

Amino Acid Availability

A key to using high levels of canola meal in poultry feeds is to balance the diets to digestible amino acid minimums. The digestibility of key essential amino acids is lower in canola meal than in soybean meal (Heartland Lysine, 1998) as shown in Table 1.

Table 1 Poultry true digestibility coefficients of some key essential amino acids in canola meal and soybean meal (Heartland Lysine, 1998)

Amino acid
Canola meal digestibility (%)
Soybean meal digestibility (%)
Lysine 79 91
Methionine 90 92
Cystine 73 84
Threonine 78 88
Tryptophan 82 88

These differences in amino acid digestibility can be significant in practical feed formulation and, at high canola meal inclusion levels in feed, if not allowed for could result in a 5 to 10% decrease in bird performance (growth rate). The issue of the lower amino acid digestibility in canola meal compared to soybean meal is not as relevant today as it was previously. Since the early 1990's most feed users around the world have been balancing diets on the basis of digestible rather than total amino acid levels.

Enzymes

Several researchers have used dietary enzymes in attempts to increase protein, phosphorus and carbohydrate digestibility in canola meal (Kocher et al., 2000; Simbaya et al., 1996; Slominski and Campbell, 1990). In these studies, enzyme use has resulted in moderate increases in canola meal nutrient digestibility, especially in soluble NSP digestibility, but these improvements have not been accompanied by increased bird performance. Practically, the use of dietary enzymes is very common in poultry feeds, especially those containing barley and wheat. These same enzyme cocktails are almost certainly increasing the nutrient digestibility of canola meal when it is included in these feeds, although it is currently difficult to quantify the canola meal digestibility improvement and, therefore, adjust nutrient values appropriately.

Layers

Canola meal is a commonly used and economically effective feed ingredient in commercial layer diets. Various studies have looked at the effects of canola meal on egg production and associated parameters over the entire production cycle (Kiiskinen, 1989; Nasser et al., 1985; Robblee et al., 1986). The results from these studies were pooled and shown in Figure 1. Canola meal supports high levels of egg production and has no effect on the number of eggs produced. Feed intake and egg size also show no significant difference when canola meal is fed although there is a small numerical decrease in both when canola meal is added to the diet. A negative effect of canola meal on feed intake and egg size has been noted in short-term studies with young layers (Summers et al., 1988a, b). These researchers speculated that the decrease in egg size is due to a decrease in energy intake. The reason for the decreased feed intake is unknown but it is thought that the phytic acid in canola meal may reduce calcium availability and in turn decrease feed intake (Summers et al., 1988b).


FIGURE 1 Effect of including canola meal in layer diets on full cycle
egg production, egg weight and feed consumption per bird*



*Pooled results of Kiiskinen, 1989; Nasser et.al., 1985; Robblee et.al., 1986; expressed as percentage of control diet. Average canola meal inclusion level was 10%.

Some caution is indicated in using canola meal in layer diets. There is an association between a low level of liver hemorrhage mortality and feeding canola meal to egg layers. Butler et al. (1982) showed that the deaths are associated with hepatocyte degeneration, abnormalities in the biliary system and leakage of cellular enzymes into the plasma. The causative agent is unknown, but a lower incidence is found at lower levels of dietary glucosinolates. It is a difficult problem to study because it is coincident with fatty liver syndrome, which can be influenced by many factors. A study by Campbell and Slominski (1991) is interesting because they were able to effectively isolate the glucosinolate effect. They fed different cultivars of canola meal, varying in glucosinolate content, at a level of 25% in wheat and barley based diets. The results show a linear increase in liver hemorrhage mortality with increasing glucosinolates up to a plateau (Table 2). There was no effect on egg production or feed consumption. Thyroid weight increased with increasing glucosinolates as did liver glutathione content. The increase in glutathione activity may be due to an induction of liver detoxification mechanisms.

Tony :D

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 9:22 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Location: On the Monaro
Wow - thanks Tony.
:roll:
I'm not sure now - maybe I'll just feed it to our horses.
:wink:


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