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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:07 am 
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Flock Master
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How can I worm my birds

How can I worm my birds & how do they work

It will all depend on what medications your store has for you to buy
Different brands come in varying strengths
Always follow the directions on the label

You can go about it in several way
Medication that is given in the drinking water or eating it
Medication that is given by drops on the back on the neck (skin)
Medication that is given by tablets
Medication that is given by injection

Water meds are:
Piperazine
Levamisole (tetramisole active ingredient)
Moxidectin
Ivermectin for beef and sheep (not FDA approved)
Wazine (same as piperazine)
Tramizo


Drops at back on neck (skin) not FDA approved

Ivermectin for beef and sheep
Cydectin for beef and sheep
Frontline plus for dogs

Tablets
Droncit for tapeworm
Prazivet for tapeworm

Injections
Ivermect (approved by FDA) can also be given orally ¼ cc or 7 drops for a bantam

Powder
Coumaphos (Meldane) goes into the feed
Flubenvet powder goes into the feed
Hygromycin B is a feed additive
Mebendazole (based on thiabendazole) feed additive
Meldane feed additive
Phenothiazineis is a powder
Thiabendazole feed additive

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
If you give tablets or water medication ... re do the birds 14 days after you give them the first dose... the larvae are not killed by the medication, you have to wait until they grow into adults to kill them, hence the second dose 14 days later

Before you administer worm medication if you think your bird has tapeworms or a really bad infestation of worms – this is what you should do
a. Withhold feed from the flock for 18 hours before worming
b. About an hour after worming, feed moist mash, which causes hungry chickens to eat slowly

Some people will say to use other preparations, so some will be for them others against them

It is up to you what you end up using on your birds... it is up to you to make up your own mind to what you want to do and how you want to do it

I suggest you look closely at all the medications and suggestions and figure out what would be best... ask the local store owner or manager what others use in your general area, and how they rate it

How often should I worm
You will also be given conflicting information on how many times you should worm your flock, this will all depend on how you manage them and if they are free range or caged birds, chickens on an open range will need worming more than the caged birds, birds in warm humid climates need worming more often than caged birds
Free range – 4 times a year
Caged birds – 2 times a year or when needed

Poultry can tolerate a small percentage of worms in their systems, you should never worm your birds just because you think it’s a good idea, and you should never worm them more than they really need to be wormed

What to look for – are your birds worm infested
2. They look scrawny and scruffy
3. They start to lose weight
4. They are laying fewer eggs
5. They start to affect the birds general health

After you have used one wormer for a time, parasites will become resistant to it, use one wormer for 2 years or eight to ten generations, then change over to another wormer, don’t alternate too quickly, or the parasites will become resistant to all the wormers

Wormers work in two ways
1. By interfering with the parasites feeding pattern (by starving it) or by
2. Paralysing it, so it is expelled live in the chickens body waste

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Last edited by Sandy on Tue Feb 19, 2008 7:33 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:11 am 
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General Information


Intestinal Parasites in Backyard Chicken Flocks

Gary D. Butcher, D.V.M., Ph.D. and Richard D. Miles, Ph.D.2

Intestinal parasites (worms) are very common in chickens in the backyard type poultry flocks. The presence of a few parasites do not usually cause a problem. However, large numbers can have a devastating effect on growth, egg production, and over-all health.

The concentration of parasite eggs in the chickens environment is one factor which plays a major role in determining the severity of the infection. The chickens pick up the parasite eggs directly by ingesting contaminated feed, water, or litter or by eating snails, earthworms, or other insects (intermediate hosts) which can carry the eggs.

Clinical signs of parasitism are unthriftyness, poor growth and feed conversion, decreased egg production, and even death in severe infections. Furthermore, parasites can make the flock less resistant to diseases and exacerbate existing disease conditions.

Of all the intestinal worms, large roundworms (Ascaridia galli) probably inflict the most damage. Young birds are affected more severely. A mild infection is often not noticed. Large numbers of worms, however, interfere with feed absorption causing poor growth and production. In severe infections there can be actual intestinal blockage by the worms, causing death.

Affected birds are unthrifty and more susceptible to other diseases. Roundworms are passed from bird to bird by directly ingesting the parasite egg in fecal contaminated feed, water, or litter, or by eating grasshoppers or earthworms carrying the parasite.

Another worm commonly found in chickens is the cecal worm (Heterakis gallinarum). While it rarely causes problems in chickens, its chief economic importance lies in its role as a carrier of the organism

Histomonas melegridis, which causes a deadly disease in turkeys known as blackhead. Earthworms ingest the cecal worm egg containing the histomonad organism from the chicken litter.

When the earthworms are ingested by the turkeys, they become infected. The cecal worm egg containing the histomonad organism may also be directly ingested by turkeys. Thus, one should never house chickens and turkeys together or allow turkeys on range which chickens have previously occupied.

Other intestinal parasites that cause problems are the small roundworms (Capillaria sp.). These parasites infect the intestines causing hemorrhage and thickening of the intestinal walls, leading to poor feed absorption and poor growth. Small roundworms are passed directly from bird to bird by ingestion of the parasite eggs or by ingestion of earthworms, insects, and other vectors carrying the parasite.

Tapeworms are also very common, but unlike other worms must be passed through an intermediate host, such as a snail, slug, earthworm, beetle or fly.

Prevention and control of worm infestations in backyard poultry flocks involves proper management of diet, sanitation, and treatment. Chickens need a proper diet, especially an adequate supply of vitamins A and the B complex. A deficiency in these has been shown to increase the susceptibility to parasitism.

Sanitation procedures include:
Thorough removal of litter between flocks of chickens.
Keep litter as dry as possible.
Avoid overcrowding.
Keep wild birds, pigeons and other birds away from chickens. They may be infected and shedding the worm eggs.
Provide adequate drainage of ranges and move shelters frequently to decrease accumulation of droppings.
Keep birds off freshly plowed ground where ingestion of earthworms and other insects is more likely.

Use insecticides to control insect populations.

The treatment of chickens to control intestinal parasites can benefit the grower by decreasing parasite levels in heavily infected birds. This will result in a decrease in the build-up of parasite eggs in the environment. Specific worm infections require specific medications.

A determination of which worms are affecting your chickens should be made by your veterinarian prior to treatment. Proper use of medication in combination with sound management and sanitation practices should limit production losses from intestinal worms.

Footnotes
1. This document was published January 1992 as Fact Sheet VM-76, a series of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Reviewed November 1995.
2. Gary D. Butcher, D.V.M., Ph.D., Poultry Veterinarian, and Richard D. Miles, Ph.D. Poultry Nutritionist, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity - Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office.

Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry R. Arrington, Interim Dean


Copyright Information
This document is copyrighted by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) for the people of the State of Florida. UF/IFAS retains all rights under all conventions, but permits free reproduction by all agents and offices of the Cooperative Extension Service and the people of the State of Florida. Permission is granted to others to use these materials in part or in full for educational purposes, provided that full credit is given to the UF/IFAS, citing the publication, its source, and date of publication.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:18 am 
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Flock Master
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Types of Worms in Chooks

There are three classes of gut parasites
Roundworms
Tapeworms
Flukes

Worms
Worms can sometimes be found in the intestines of chickens. When chickens are kept on a litter floor, the worms will have direct cycle through their droppings. Worm eggs are discharged in the droppings; after the worm eggs incubate in the litter for about 10 days they will contain larvae, and other chickens will pick up these embryonating worm eggs and become infected with worms.

A severe infestation can also cause an intestinal obstruction and result in death. Sometimes a bird will contract both an ascarid and a cocci infection at the same time, and because of the synergistic relationship between the two, will succumb more readily than if they were only stricken with one infection or the other. In rare but documented cases, an ascarid can actually find its way into a hen’s egg, which can be quite unappealing to an unsuspecting fresh egg customer. The worm can be detected by candling.


Two major kinds of worm exist:

1. Roundworms (Ascaridia galli)
These are large worms up to 3 inches long that can live in the intestine, use the chicken's nutrients while the larvae damage the intestinal wall. Piperazine, a common harmless wormer, will eliminate roundworms, but reinfection of the chickens can occur through the litter. Piperazine should be given in the drinking water twice, with a 3-week interval.
Roundworms can cause drops in egg production, but normally do not harm the birds severely. However, intestinal absorption of nutrients will be interfered with.

2. Hairworms (Capillaria).
These worms are much smaller than roundworms, approximately 1/2-inch in length and very thin threadlike. Therefore they are difficult to find in the intestinal contents. Capillaria have a direct litter bird cycle or an indirect cycle via earthworms, the latter being a factor in chickens that range outdoors. Capillaria cause considerable damage to the intestinal wall and can deprive the chicken of nutrients and vitamins.
Platinum yolks can be found in eggs from infected hens as well as paleness of the birds themselves.
Treatment with piperazine does not eliminate capillaria, and other wormers will have to be used. The feed is often supplemented with extra vitamin A in capillaria-infected chickens.
In addition to these two commonly occurring worms in chickens, we can find other kinds that are of lesser importance:

3. Cecal worms (Heterakis)
These are worms that inhabit the ceca (blind sacs in intestine), but do not appear to cause sickness in chickens.

4. Tapeworms
Tapeworms are occasionally found in chickens. They require special treatment, but usually do not constitute a hazard to the chicken's health, unless large numbers are present.

5. Gapeworms
Gapeworms occupy the trachea of pheasants primarily, but may be found in chickens, too. Cause gasping in pheasants and young chickens. Special wormer is required for gapeworms. Gapeworms cycle through earthworms, so chickens will get infected only outdoors or on dirt floors.

In an average chicken flock with floor operation, good management practices and periodical piperazine or other worm treatment when roundworms or hairworms are present will keep the flock healthy. If severe worm problems exist, a good worming program should be instituted, for which advice can be obtained from the Extension Service. Wire floors eliminate the worm cycle and keep chickens free of intestinal worms.

Birds with gapeworm infestation show signs of respiratory distress due to both the damage to the lungs and to the trachea that is caused by the worms. Young birds and bantams are especially vulnerable due to their relatively small trachea. Symptoms include depression, gasping for breath, and head shaking in an attempt to remove the worms from the trachea. Tracheal rales (a gurgling sound made during breathing that accompanies tracheal irritation) can be heard in many cases, and can sometimes be mistaken for an upper respiratory infection of some other cause.

The most commonly known worm ‘hosts’ (carriers) are the earthworm, cockroach, beetle, sowbug, grasshopper, and earwig. The earthworm is known specifically to carry the gapeworm.

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Last edited by Sandy on Tue Feb 19, 2008 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:40 pm 
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Gallant Game
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I have never wormed my birds... they are all in good condition ( only have 3) one who is broody seems to have lice near her head? will put a post on that next.

question is this ... if my hens are well do I worm them? we have alot of starlings,spoggys.maggies etc coming to eat where my chooks free range.

cheers Lisa

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:45 pm 
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Great Game
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Chookaloo wrote:
I have never wormed my birds... they are all in good condition ( only have 3) one who is broody seems to have lice near her head? will put a post on that next.

question is this ... if my hens are well do I worm them? we have alot of starlings,spoggys.maggies etc coming to eat where my chooks free range.

cheers Lisa


... yes, it is highly recommended that you do :)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 7:30 pm 
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Gallant Game
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is the frontline for dogs good for both worms and lice etc?

just thought it would be good idea to traet chooks at same time as dog and cat gets a bout !

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 7:37 pm 
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Great Game
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Or you could use a treatment for dogs, “Frontline”, once again you use 3 to 4 drops per large bird and 1 to 2 drops for bantams, at the base of the neck, it kills all external parasites including the stick fast flea, scaly leg mite, and mites and such, from what I have been told there is no withholding period when you use this product (be very careful how you use this too much can be dangerous to the bird)


As far as i know (Sandy will correct me if i am wrong :oops: ) 'Frontline Plus' can be used on chickens and will treat worms too... but as it says above, you need to be very careful about not giving the bird too much..


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 7:46 pm 
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Gallant Game
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thanks mate, I will start at one drop as I have bantam light sussex

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 2:13 pm 
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is frontline plus for dogs a wormer or a flea treatment?
I have looked online it seemed to me to be for fleas etc

maybe Im not looking at the right product ? :oops:

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 5:09 pm 
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Flock Master
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Two products...

Frontline

and

Frontline Plus

Frontline Plus for cats is a topical 'spot-on' application for the treatment and prevention of flea infestation and biting lice on cats and kittens. Frontline Plus has a rapid onset of action and kills re-infestations with newly acquired adult fleas for at least one month. Frontline Plus also prevents the development of flea eggs, larvae and pupae produced by any adult fleas acquired for up to 6 weeks after treatment. Frontline Plus treats and controls Flea Allergy Dermatitis in cats. It can be used on kittens from 8 weeks of age and is safe to use on breeding, pregnant or lactating animals. Frontline Plus is waterfast from 24 hours after application.

FRONTLINE Plus offers the long-lasting, most complete flea and tick control available, killing up to 100% of fleas on your pet within 18 hours and up to 100% of ticks on your pet within 48 hours. Best of all, research confirms that FRONTLINE products work for an entire month to help keep your pet flea-free.

So by this ... it only affects lice and mites and ticks... not worms..

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 7:30 pm 
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yeah thanks mate thats what I thought when I was reading it but on the worming page above it mentions frontline plus so I thought I was going nuts :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 7:52 am 
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Does anybody know if I can use fenbendazole as a wormer for the chooks. I have Cydectin but I alos have Panacur which is fenbendazole that I use for my sheep. The panacur is one I give the sheep orally so I was wondering if it's okay to use as the cydectin has to be done on individuals..and I have a LOT of individuals.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 9:39 pm 
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FENBENDAZOLE Panacur
AVIAN DRUGS & DOSAGES
ANTHELMINTICS




Dosage/Interval/Duration:
10-50 mg/kg Once then repeat in 10 days

Notes & References:.
Not to be used during molt (may stunt feathers), or while nesting.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 1:01 pm 
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Hi,
I have not yet wormed my hens, i have 2 that I've had since they hatched, 3 bantams that i bought recently, and another 2 hens that I also bought recently and the guy I picked them up from indicated they were due for a worming.
SO
They are all housed together. I would prefer to use something I can put in their water. I have ivermectin here that i use on the guinea pigs - it has been diluted enough to make it safe to give directly to them.
Is it OK to add that straight to the chickens water?

Thanks,
Ali


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 4:47 pm 
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Cydectin for beef and sheep ,why carnt this be used in water as a wormer,for chooks ???


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