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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:36 pm 
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Superior Bird
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The Barnevelder Fowl
Renowned for their deep brown eggs this breed originated in Holland. It now has many followers because not only is it a good layer, but it also possesses many attractive features.

Origins
The breed has its origins in the district of Barneveld in Holland where it was developed as a dual purpose bird that laid very dark brown eggs.

History
The demand created a breed. The Barnevelder was born from the urge to have birds which laid very dark, brown eggs. It started life as a farmyard fowl in the area of Barneveld about 160 years ago. These farmyard fowls were crossed with the new breed from the east, Cochins.
This first cross, letâs called it Barnevelder I (1885) was then crossed with the Croad Langshans. It is this cross that is believed to have produced the dark coloured egg. The eggs were also larger than those produced by the Langshans.
This second cross, Barnevelder II, was then crossed with the Buff Orpington to produce Barnevelder III (1906). It should be appreciated that the crosses were all intended to improve the size and colour of the egg and the colour patterns or other characteristics were irrelevant at this stage.
From 1910 onwards some attempt was made to standardize the shape, size and colour and in 1921 a Society of Barnevelder Breeders was formed in Holland.
** there has been some rumours that the Indian Game was crossed in there somewhere to get the double lacing, but the Dutch hotly dispute that train of thought. The Indian Game cross may have been used in the UK at a later date, but findings seem to report it was at the expense of type and egg colour.

Colours
Colours listed in the Australian Standard are Black, Double Laced, Partridge and Silver.

The double lacing shows on the female plumage and each feather on the breast, saddle, back and thighs should have a red-brown ground, clear of peppering and have a defined, glossy black outer lacing and inner defined lacing. Hackle should be black with beetle green sheen.
Image

Male double laced have neck and saddle hackle feathers to match for colour and definition and each feather to be black with a slight red-brown edging and red-brown centre quill finishing black to the tip. Breast should show some red-brown with black outer edging or lacing. Back and cape have red-brown feathers with very wide black lacing. Wing bow and bar, red-brown with broad lacing and the primaries have inner edge black with outer red-brown. Secondaries show inner edge black, outer edge red-brown finely laced with black, showing when closed as a red-brown wing bay. Tail all main feathers to be black. *Note that all black on birds should show beetle-green sheen.
Image

Partridge females are similar to double laced with the exception that instead of the inner lace, the feather should be evenly stippled with small black peppering clear of any inner lacing or penciling, each feather will still show the glossy black outer lacing. Partridge males show no lacing on the chest. Back, cape and wing bow to be red-brown with wide black tip.


Listed is not the complete standard, but a rough description to give you and idea about how the birds should appear.

There are also rumours of other colours being worked on in Australia.


Image

Eggs
Eggs should be a DARK brown colour. This is originally what the breed was breed for, but has been lost to a large extent. They were also noted for being a very good laying breed. In 1932 a hen owned by E W Spencer laid 266 eggs in 48 weeks of which 249 were super grade.
Image

Not only egg laying was at the top of the league, according to Captain A Kaufman, he was producing 4.5pound birds at 14 weeks of age, which made it a first class dual purpose breed. One problem that the breed has faced has been the choice to breed smaller birds because of the quality of their lacing, loosing some of the size the bird should have.

Weights listed in the Standard

Fowls
Cock 3.2-3.6kg
cockerel 2.7-3.2kg
Hen 2.7-3.2kg
Pullet 2.25-2.7kg

Bantams
Male 850-1075g
Female 680-910g

General Description as taken from "The Barnevelder Fowl" by Joseph Batty
The Barnevelder is said to be upright in carriage, but this should not be taken too literally because the carriage is semi-upright when compared with breeds such as Malays and Shamos. This is not to state that the breed is not attractive, because the positive lines and medium tight plumage show the shape of the body to perfection. The standard suggests the body appears compressed, emphasizing the moulding of the feathers around the body.
Image

The body should be deep and of reasonable length and as a result, the back should be fairly short. In some respects there are similarities to the RIR and New Hampshire, but the tail is higher than the RIR and the back with a positive U-curve, appears different.
Image

We cannot ignore the shape of the body because the Barnevelder is a dual purpose breed and therefore most comply with the laying and table requirements.
Alertness is a characteristic of a productive bird and naturally this aspect should be present. There is not place for slow moving birds because these are not generally productive, actively scratching for food and being on the move would be the normal expectation.

Image

The Barnevelder cannot be regarded as hard feathered, which is a term to describe game birds, however, it cannot be truly treated as a soft feathered which implies a profuse covering of feathers with fluff underneath. Medium feathering is more appropriate.
Legs and thighs should be of nedium lenght. There should be a reasonable bend at the hocks, which is quite visible on males, but only just with the female. They should be a good, clear yellow in colour.

Suitability
The Barnevelder is a great backyard fowl. They are good layers of dark, brown eggs. Medium sized, good foraging birds, which should dress well for the table. Unfortunately good quality birds are hard to find and often fall into utility (poorly marked, but dark eggs) or show quality (good lacing, but may have poor egg colour and laying). They are a lovely even tempered bird that can be a little unruly when young, but they grow out of it.

Image


Cost
I have seen poor quality pullets go for $25 at auction with better birds reaching well over $100. With this breed I think you do often get what you pay for.

A lot of my information has come from "The Barnevelder Fowl" by Joseph Batty and the Australian Poultry Standards First Edition.


*added more pictures


Last edited by coopslave on Wed Jun 24, 2009 11:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:00 pm 
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Wise One
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Well done coops.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:01 pm 
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Dapper Duck
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Thanks for that! But I have a newbie question ... what is "peppering"?


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 3:34 pm 
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Superior Bird
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MWR wrote:
Thanks for that! But I have a newbie question ... what is "peppering"?


My understanding is that peppering is a speckled kind of effect, like putting pepper on something. Would look something like this:
Image

See how there is just a black lace around the outside, but the inside is kind of speckled, no definate lines or lacing. I think that is what it means.
Hard to find a good picture of it, but I am visual and a picture always helps me understand better than just words.


Thanks Nick. :D


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:00 pm 
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Golden Phoenix
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A most well-written outline!! Thank you! Helps me understand the Barnie part of the chookies I've got, too :)


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:04 pm 
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Proud Rooster
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Thankyou, your effort with the production of this material is very much appreciated. We now have all the information in one place. Many thanks.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:22 am 
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Great summary, coopslave.
There is some additional info on wikipedia on breed history, recognized and unrecognized colours, and info from the Netherlands on why the double-laced pattern was initially chosen as the standard.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:27 am 
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Superior Bird
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Thanks chook. Good info and pics. Some of it seemed a bit americanized. Very disappointed with the egg colour they showed. I wouldn't breed from birds producing such light eggs myself.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:37 am 
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Wise One
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Thanks coopslave its great info! Very timely for me as I've just purchased some doubled laced barnie eggs and "fingers crossed" I will get at least a male and female out of it....which you may regret because then I willing be picking your brains hmmmm :oops:


Cheers,
Michelle

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 9:44 am 
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Superior Bird
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Good luck with your hatch, I think you will really like them. I have dabbled in a few other breeds, and they have come and gone, but there is just something about the barnies I really like.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 10:40 am 
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coopslave wrote:
Thanks chook. Good info and pics. Some of it seemed a bit americanized. Very disappointed with the egg colour they showed. I wouldn't breed from birds producing such light eggs myself.


It has become very hard to obtain good dark egg layers because of the emphasis on showing rather than utility and egg colour. If you weren't so far away I'd beg you for some hatching eggs :mrgreen:
I have Barnies from Germany, Britain and Ireland and none lay eggs quite as dark as the ones in your photo. The wiki photo of the eggs is not mine but perhaps we could use your photo instead?

Quote:
Some of it seemed a bit americanized
In what way?

chook-in-eire


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:02 am 
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Superior Bird
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Quote:
Some of it seemed a bit americanized
In what way?

chook-in-eire[/quote]

Hmmm, I suppose this is a good case of don't say something unless you can back it up! :lol: I have to admit it was more just the feel I got from some of it, but I do have a bit of sensitivity to the American thing originally coming from Canada. Living in the 'shadow' and all. I will have to retract my statement chook-in-eire and appologise. :roll:

You are incredibly lucky to have birds from Germany, Britain and Ireland. Their lacing must be amazing! I always envy the pictures I see from overseas. I would love to see some pics of your birds!

It is a struggle here to keep the dark eggs. I have been lucky and started with good colour and have been able to maintain it (mostly).

Where are you from?


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:33 am 
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Dapper Duck
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Great report, you have converted me. I'm looking now for some.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:26 pm 
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Clever Cockerel
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I really find these breed profiles very informative. I am now hoping to get at least one Barnevelder out of some mixed eggs I have coming.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 9:34 pm 
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coopslave wrote:
Quote:
I will have to retract my statement chook-in-eire and appologise. :roll:

Absolutely no need. :) I was just wondering. I wrote most of the entry and I'm a German lass living in Ireland. Hence my surprise.
Quote:
You are incredibly lucky to have birds from Germany, Britain and Ireland. Their lacing must be amazing! I always envy the pictures I see from overseas. I would love to see some pics of your birds!

The hen and cock in the wiki entry were mine. The hen was from Britain, she has unfortunately died since. She was the nicest laced bird I have had so far. The cock was bred from German X Irish birds. I sold him to a show breeder who has showed him with good success. I will post some other pics below.
Quote:
It is a struggle here to keep the dark eggs. I have been lucky and started with good colour and have been able to maintain it (mostly).
It is hard to get everything in the one bird. I got some superb-looking German birds but their eggs were pale, they laid poorly and fertility was less than mediocre. I don't show and am much more interesed in utility aspects (while maintaining external characteristics). However, I have been able to blend that blood into my other lines and select for darker eggs and now have some promising birds coming on. Another problem is productivity vs. egg colour. If you select for productivity, egg colour suffers. It's not easy :mrgreen:

Here are some pics.
Berta hen @ 16 months - sunbathing
Image

Baldwin @ 18 months - Irish X British lines, one of my breeders selected for egg colour, egg size and productivity. His dam laid a good number of large eggs with the Croad Langshan plum bloom.
Image

Zapphira (British) @ c. 3 years - she has unusual triple lacing; and Willem, another breeding cock
Image

Franca (German X Irish line), still a good layer in her 4th year with relatively dark eggs; her lacing is a bit heavy in the outer lace but she excels in utility aspects. I now have three daughters of hers with my British cock and their pullet eggs are quite dark.
Image

Prillan @ 2 years (Irish X British line), a great wee adventurous and productive hen, always jumping the fence and hiding her quite dark eggs under bushes and such :mrgreen:
Image

Maizie @ c. 8 months ([British X Irish] X British lines), unfortunately she is a bit wet in the photo (2008 has been the wettest year on record since records began at Shannon Airport in 1945; it just never stopped raining ...); her lacing is very nice and goes right up into the tail feathers, have yet to capture that in a photo :roll:
Image

So much for "Barnevelders do not go broody much". Berta raised 16 chicks last summer. About 50% of my hens go broody, regardless whether they were incubator or broody hatched.
Image

Egg colour of hatching eggs - as good as it gets at present. Wished I could get hold of some of yours, coopslave :cry:
Image

chook-in-eire


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